Page 1 of 2
#1
Hey guys,

So, recently I've been really focusing on soloing and improv especially, but whenever I sit down, turn on the backtrack, right from the first bend to the last root note, all I want to do is smash my guitar, crawl into a tiny whole and stay there till Christmas. My phrases sound like shit, all I get is pissed off. Any tips? Articles? Ideas? Anything? I really want to keep at it, and I WANT to get better, but I just am in a rut, or moving at slow pace or w/e.

TL;DR I'm ****ing frustrated man.

btw: self-taught, know very little theory
#2
Learn some theory. Pentatonic scale would be a good start.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#3
Quote by gorkyporky
Learn some theory. Pentatonic scale would be a good start.


Yea man, been there done that. I suppose I should'a mentioned that.
#5
initially, you will suck and be conscious about it. then, you will suck and think you're "not bad." eventually you will sound okay but you will think you still suck.
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#6
I'm not sure if you've learned any solos from other songs or anything, but that can be a good place to start for inspiration. Note the phrasing and styles of various guitar players you admire as you learn the solos and imitate it in your own playing. As you become more comfortable your own ideas will develop and you'll start to have more fun. From a theory standpoint, learn the chord progressions of the songs or tracks you are improvising too and learn about harmony and intervals so you can know which notes sound good on top of certain chords and why and what sounds different types of harmonies make. Something that really helped me improvise when starting out was just soloing over actual songs, not backing tracks. I'd burn CDs of my favorites, crank em up, and just jam out to them.

So in short, learn phrasing by listening to the styles of those you admire and might wish to emulate and learn enough theory so you can learn what notes sound good on top of certain chords and why.
#7
Quote by Soccerguy
Well what scales do you know. Do you know about target notes and the like?

Basic a minor pentatonic. Some major scale stuff. Target notes?
#8
Quote by Faux
I'm not sure if you've learned any solos from other songs or anything, but that can be a good place to start for inspiration. Note the phrasing and styles of various guitar players you admire as you learn the solos and imitate it in your own playing. As you become more comfortable your own ideas will develop and you'll start to have more fun. From a theory standpoint, learn the chord progressions of the songs or tracks you are improvising too and learn about harmony and intervals so you can know which notes sound good on top of certain chords and why and what sounds different types of harmonies make. Something that really helped me improvise when starting out was just soloing over actual songs, not backing tracks. I'd burn CDs of my favorites, crank em up, and just jam out to them.

So in short, learn phrasing by listening to the styles of those you admire and might wish to emulate and learn enough theory so you can learn what notes sound good on top of certain chords and why.


Thanks for the advice. I suppose I SHOULD suck it up and learn solos. I hate learning solos cause I'm terribly lazy when it comes to learning them.
#9
Well if you analyze the chord changes, let's say they're all triads, you can do things like landing on the root, 3rd, or 5th of a chord for a flavourful touch. Learning more scales and learning to use things like altered 5ths and 9ths and whatnot and using arpeggios and the list goes on. A good idea is to look at some transcriptions of your favourite solos and find bits that you like and analyze them.
#10
Quote by Soccerguy
Well if you analyze the chord changes, let's say they're all triads, you can do things like landing on the root, 3rd, or 5th of a chord for a flavourful touch. Learning more scales and learning to use things like altered 5ths and 9ths and whatnot and using arpeggios and the list goes on. A good idea is to look at some transcriptions of your favourite solos and find bits that you like and analyze them.


Sounds good man, lemme just google translate that real quick.

I honestly really have no clue what triads are or 3rd/5th chord is. Sorry man, I'm a relatively pathetic guitarist.
#11
Something else that greatly helped me improve my improvisation and have fun was also to just play with others. That is the fastest way to improve on an instrument in my opinion. As oppose to a backing track. Jam and write music with other people and you should achieve noticeable improvements relatively quickly. However, it is important to note, improvement tends to come in plateaus so don't get discouraged!
#12
That doesn't make you a pathetic guitarist. Looking up a little theory never hurts though.
To help a bit, a simple triad (Major or minor chord) is made up of a root note, a minor or major 3rd, and a 5th. So a G major chord for example, would be made up of a G (root), B (3rd), and D (5th). These are the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes in the G major scale.
#13
Quote by Faux
Something else that greatly helped me improve my improvisation and have fun was also to just play with others. That is the fastest way to improve on an instrument in my opinion. As oppose to a backing track. Jam and write music with other people and you should achieve noticeable improvements relatively quickly. However, it is important to note, improvement tends to come in plateaus so don't get discouraged!



Well, unfortunately, I lack others to play with. It's just me, bro!
#14
Quote by Soccerguy
That doesn't make you a pathetic guitarist. Looking up a little theory never hurts though.
To help a bit, a simple triad (Major or minor chord) is made up of a root note, a minor or major 3rd, and a 5th. So a G major chord for example, would be made up of a G (root), B (3rd), and D (5th). These are the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes in the G major scale.



I guess the pathetic guitarist was out of place, I'm just really down and frustrated right now

I suppose I should look up some theory, I guess. Thanks man, I really appreciate it.
#15
when you play, are you thinking? consciously thinking? or are you just playing "whatever the ****", for lack of a better word? if you're not consciously thinking about what you're doing, you're not learning anything, and, therefore, you're not improving.

definitely learn theory, definitely learn solos. think about what you're telling yourself to do if you're not. see, what theory and actual music does is teach you what other, generally successful, accomplished, or otherwise skilled people have done. by not studying theory or the music of other musicians, you're essentially making yourself "reinvent the wheel", so to speak. you're closing yourself off to the results of experimentation and study by centuries of musicians.

as you open your palette to other styles of music (i don't care who's a good guitarist, good songwriter, whatever, johann sebastian bach is still the goddamn god of music), as you learn it and apply the theory you've learned to properly and effectively analyze it to augment your own understanding of music, you'll find that you'll be able to create better phrases or better sounds more naturally than you would have had you declined to study your art seriously.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#16
Quote by AeolianWolf
when you play, are you thinking? consciously thinking? or are you just playing "whatever the ****", for lack of a better word? if you're not consciously thinking about what you're doing, you're not learning anything, and, therefore, you're not improving.

definitely learn theory, definitely learn solos. think about what you're telling yourself to do if you're not. see, what theory and actual music does is teach you what other, generally successful, accomplished, or otherwise skilled people have done. by not studying theory or the music of other musicians, you're essentially making yourself "reinvent the wheel", so to speak. you're closing yourself off to the results of experimentation and study by centuries of musicians.

as you open your palette to other styles of music (i don't care who's a good guitarist, good songwriter, whatever, johann sebastian bach is still the goddamn god of music), as you learn it and apply the theory you've learned to properly and effectively analyze it to augment your own understanding of music, you'll find that you'll be able to create better phrases or better sounds more naturally than you would have had you declined to study your art seriously.


Thanks man, I appreciate this.

Where to start, however?
#17
Quote by Biebsy
Thanks man, I appreciate this.

Where to start, however?

Start learning the vocabulary
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8n39SpPFPI
Learn blues by ear. It may seem like an impossible task at first to copy the licks, but you'll find its pretty easy after a little bit of practice. Just find some small phrases you like from T-Bone and try to copy them by ear
#18
Quote by Biebsy
Hey guys,

So, recently I've been really focusing on soloing and improv especially, but whenever I sit down, turn on the backtrack, right from the first bend to the last root note, all I want to do is smash my guitar, crawl into a tiny whole and stay there till Christmas. My phrases sound like shit, all I get is pissed off. Any tips? Articles? Ideas? Anything? I really want to keep at it, and I WANT to get better, but I just am in a rut, or moving at slow pace or w/e.

TL;DR I'm ****ing frustrated man.

btw: self-taught, know very little theory


Learn solos by ear.
#19
Try starting phrases differently, start on an off beat, start on the three, try some different stuff man! Learn theory, learn songs and solos by ear.

One thing my teacher had me do was, lets say if i was soloing over Dm Gmaj Cmaj, practice the scales that go with each chord in a certain part of the neck. For example, i was only aloud to use the open strings to the 5th fret. It was difficult at first but i got a lot out of it. Idk its something to try/think about
#20
I agree with the people who say learn the chords first. If you can't play the chords you have no reference for the notes you play. Too many people have gotten away from being good solid rhythm players so they have no direct reference to which notes would sound good given the chord structure of the song. It's like painting in the dark if you can't play the chords to the song. Don't learn to play just a couple scales and think they universally work over everything. A good solo often adds other notes to the chord structure beneath it and provide another level of tone and harmony. If you don't know the chords you are just playing scales with no reference to the actual song.

I also struggle with improvising because I get lazy mentally. I'll be halfway through a promising solo and then get distracted and start playing some scale that I fall into because it is the easy way out. It wasn't a bad solo to start with but after a nice start where I was actually challenging myself and doing something different, I fell right back into my comfort zone and just started wandering through some scale. I piss myself off doing that all the time. I'll do something like that and finish with some trick like some trills or pull offs and the audience thinks it was great. I know it was just the same old thing in another key.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 21, 2014,
#21
What you need is to train your ear. Memorize this:
http://www.guitar-guide-easy.com/images/stories/fretboard.jpg

Memorize all of these:
http://www.guitarbyte.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/chords-scales.jpg


Download and use this daily:
http://www.miles.be/software


Use this every day to work on distinguishing chords:
http://www.musictheory.net/exercises/ear-chord
Last edited by macashmack at Jan 21, 2014,
#23
I don't really relate to this much. I enjoyed improvising with minor pentatonic over backing tracks from day one, as soon as I had learned that scale and found backing tracks. And I had not at that point learned any solos, whether from tabs or by ear. I had read something about great blues artists knowing not to use too many notes, and letting silence be an important part of the soloing, so I generally would jam slowly, focusing on emotion. I had also read some basic stuff on starting / coming home to tonic, at start/end of phrases/measures, and that helped the stuff sound good regardless of what was played in middle. I had also read that generally you would stick with bending the note before the blue note, and not, say, bending the tonic or most other notes, and that also helps it sound good from the get-go.

Some of my note choices sucked, and so I learned to avoid those moves. But at the same time, I was finding some of the phrases very pleasing too my ear, and that made me enjoy the process. I mean, it's hard staying in the scale, and starting/ending on tonic not to sound good, if you are not racing, if your picking and fretting is reasonably clean, etc.

I do think it's probably important not to rush or try for too much speed. And it's probably best to start out going for a bluesy feel, as that is probably easiest to capture if you're using minor pentatonic (with blue note, aka blues scale), and does not require speed. You can literally limit yourself to just a couple notes you go back and forth between and make that sound good for a bluesy solo, so I can only guess if your soloing sounds like crap, that you are trying to do too much, too fast, and/or you don't know some basic rules for simple, good-sounding beginner blues soloing. I think there are articles and youtube instructions on that as well, if you search.

As you get comfortable with that simple jamming, you can then work on speed, work on string skipping, and also work on jams that emphasize a different "home" note other than the minor tonic, which is a good introduction into playing in other modes besides Aeolian (relative minor) or Ionian (major).

Ken
Bernie Sanders for President!
#24
Quote by krm27
I don't really relate to this much. I enjoyed improvising with minor pentatonic over backing tracks from day one, as soon as I had learned that scale and found backing tracks. And I had not at that point learned any solos, whether from tabs or by ear. I had read something about great blues artists knowing not to use too many notes, and letting silence be an important part of the soloing, so I generally would jam slowly, focusing on emotion. I had also read some basic stuff on starting / coming home to tonic, at start/end of phrases/measures, and that helped the stuff sound good regardless of what was played in middle. I had also read that generally you would stick with bending the note before the blue note, and not, say, bending the tonic or most other notes, and that also helps it sound good from the get-go.

Some of my note choices sucked, and so I learned to avoid those moves. But at the same time, I was finding some of the phrases very pleasing too my ear, and that made me enjoy the process. I mean, it's hard staying in the scale, and starting/ending on tonic not to sound good, if you are not racing, if your picking and fretting is reasonably clean, etc.

I do think it's probably important not to rush or try for too much speed. And it's probably best to start out going for a bluesy feel, as that is probably easiest to capture if you're using minor pentatonic (with blue note, aka blues scale), and does not require speed. You can literally limit yourself to just a couple notes you go back and forth between and make that sound good for a bluesy solo, so I can only guess if your soloing sounds like crap, that you are trying to do too much, too fast, and/or you don't know some basic rules for simple, good-sounding beginner blues soloing. I think there are articles and youtube instructions on that as well, if you search.

As you get comfortable with that simple jamming, you can then work on speed, work on string skipping, and also work on jams that emphasize a different "home" note other than the minor tonic, which is a good introduction into playing in other modes besides Aeolian (relative minor) or Ionian (major).

Ken



I appreciate the advice, man, really!
#25
Quote by macashmack
What you need is to train your ear. Memorize this:
http://www.guitar-guide-easy.com/images/stories/fretboard.jpg

Memorize all of these:
http://www.guitarbyte.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/chords-scales.jpg


Download and use this daily:
http://www.miles.be/software


Use this every day to work on distinguishing chords:
http://www.musictheory.net/exercises/ear-chord



Thanks man. I was literally going to ask all the other people who replied with something like: "Learn solos by ear" with "How?" And you answered my question before I asked.
#26
I think it's important to learn how to play with precision and good tone. Speed is not a factor unless you just want to impress people for about 30 seconds. Nobody walks around humming a shred solo but a lot of people can sing the notes to guitar solo on "Hotel California".
#27
Quote by Biebsy
Thanks man, I appreciate this.

Where to start, however?


I was where you are. I got the Guitar Scales Method software and put in a lot of time. After a couple of months, I was only maybe 1/3 through the course, but I just took off. I understood enough to start improvising. Seriously, that is the best software for guitarists wanting to get into improvising and understanding the theory behind scales, arpeggios, chord construction and progressions. It's play along and has an excellent grading system. You'll develop your ear and your timing and learn your fretboard as by-products.

I'm not claiming that I was great at improvisation after using the software. It just gave me the confidence and know-how to start experimenting and stop shaming myself.
Last edited by Sabicas at Jan 22, 2014,
#28
Quote by Biebsy
Sounds good man, lemme just google translate that real quick.

I honestly really have no clue what triads are or 3rd/5th chord is. Sorry man, I'm a relatively pathetic guitarist.

Then, isn't it clear what you need to do here? Get to work
#29
I know that feel man, I guess we all were there when we first started doing improvising. A less vague explanation on how to get better at improvising than "learn more theory" would be something like this; yeah, first off, learn the solos.

However, "learning" solos doesn't just stop when you can play it fluently. You have to dissect it, solos are made up of a lot of parts/licks that make it what it is. Take every lick, and put it into a scale. If you're playing blues, which I assume you are, get to know all the pentatonic scales that blues guitarists like to use. Most of the licks you learn will fit into these. Once you've done this, it should help you get your head around the "essence" of improvising, so to speak. Knowing the scales and all the licks associated with them is really important.

Next, you'll want to be able to identify which key your song is in. Ear training, yeah? There are lots of tips on identifying the key of a song, I'm sure there are lots of them on this site and other forums on the internet. Knowing the chords of scales helps, but you can also just play a scale and see if it works. When I started out, I just played the major scale over a song over and over until I found the key it was in. Pentatonic scales can work as well, although the extra notes in the major scale make it easier to identify the key imo.

Now, after this, you just put it together. If you have backing track that is, say, in A minor, then start playing all your Minor Pentatonic licks over it, in the A Minor position. At first, it may seem like a huge, incoherent mess, but just keep at it. Eventually, you'll be switching between the licks much more fluently. As you get better, you'll start adding sections to your solos instead of just randomly playing, consciously thinking "Yeah, I'm gonna start off with a nice, slow little bend here, to get things started. Maybe play that cool lick I learned yesterday. Okay, time for a melody to make my solo more memorable. A long slide here would give it some character. Aaaaand I guess I'll end it off with a fast passage for some added grit". After you get this down, start expanding your knowledge of the fretboard, don't wanna get stuck in one position. Learn other scales, and where they are in relation to each other on the fretboard. To other people, the fretboard may be a vast, unexplored land of mystery. But to you, it should be your patio. This will allow you to play your solos up and down the neck with as much freedom and variety as you please. Just remember though, baby steps. Make sure you can comfortably improvise in one scale before you start memorizing dozens of them and get lost and demotivated when you can't apply everything you want to.

Last, but not least, don't beat yourself up if you think your solos suck. It's always healthy to acknowledge your shortcomings, because it allows you room to improve, but if you think your solos suck, ask yourself "why?" It's better to look at your solo and say "Okay, this tapping thing I tried doing here sounded pretty sh*t. I should try something else" than to just think to yourself that you suck, period.

About the issue of you playing alone, if you really can't find fellow muso's to jam with, you might wanna buy yourself an audio interface and record your own backtracks. That's what I do, and trust me, it's really fun doing it. It will help your improvising a LOT, plus you can write solos to your own songs, instead of jamming along to the many generic backtracks out there. Just saying, maybe the recording forum can give you some pointers if you're interested. I hope this helps you!
#30
what you need to do is learn different scales.

different stuff like this...

1, 1,3, 1,4, 1,-5, 1,-5, 1,-5, 5, -7, 5....8, -7, 5,-5, 4,-3,1

or this

1,-2,3 -2,3,4, 3,4,5 4,5-6, 5,-6,-7 -6,-7, 8, -9,8... then artificial harmonic and make it scream
7,8,7,-6,5,4,-3,2,1....then bend the whammy bar down.lol

It'll help train your ears to distinguish the intervals between the notes.
semi tone, whole tone and 1 1/2 ...when you're traveling up and down the scale
or playing off of an arpeggio or arpeggios.

Get a cry baby...you can pump it or just let it sit to alter the tone of your guitar.
I also have a pitch bender. I use to couple it with the cry baby. It's wickage.
I can also set it to play 3 semi tone up as sort of delay. Different sounds to play with.
It makes the guitar screams easier.....
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 24, 2014,
#31
what is this i don't even...

honestly, you're making no sense whatsoever. I appreciate this may be some bespoke system you've come up with to help you organise this information, but the problem it's utterly meaningless to anyone else. If you want to explain things to people you're going to have to use some more conventional terminology.
Actually called Mark!

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#32
Quote by smc818
what you need to do is learn different scales.

different stuff like this...

1, 1,3, 1,4, 1,-5, 1,-5, 1,-5, 5, -7, 5....8, -7, 5,-5, 4,-3,1

or this

1,-2,3 -2,3,4, 3,4,5 4,5-6, 5,-6,-7 -6,-7, 8, -9,8... then artificial harmonic and make it scream
7,8,7,-6,5,4,-3,2,1....then bend the whammy bar down.lol

It'll help train your ears to distinguish the intervals between the notes.
semi tone, whole tone and 1 1/2 ...when you're traveling up and down the scale
or playing off of an arpeggio or arpeggios.

Get a cry baby...you can pump it or just let it sit to alter the tone of your guitar.
I also have a pitch bender. I use to couple it with the cry baby. It's wickage.
I can also set it to play 3 semi tone up as sort of delay. Different sounds to play with.
It makes the guitar screams easier.....

#33
Quote by Biebsy
Hey guys,

So, recently I've been really focusing on soloing and improv especially, but whenever I sit down, turn on the backtrack, right from the first bend to the last root note, all I want to do is smash my guitar, crawl into a tiny whole and stay there till Christmas. My phrases sound like shit, all I get is pissed off. Any tips? Articles? Ideas? Anything? I really want to keep at it, and I WANT to get better, but I just am in a rut, or moving at slow pace or w/e.

TL;DR I'm ****ing frustrated man.

btw: self-taught, know very little theory


I suggest that you forget the backing tracks, and instead play along with real bands. Learn the solos note for note, phrase for phrase. Capture the feel. Enjoy the experience… soak up the inspiration.

IME experience backing tracks mostly benefits the person that sold it to you. They are a product… a way for unknown musicians to make some money. They do sound cool sometimes, but they are generally a person sequencing and looping, which is not the same as a band playing together and interacting. That interaction is what you feed off of as a soloist. Likewise the band interacts with the soloist. You just don't get that with backing tracks, so you're forced to think and judge your way through it….. "ok now I'm gonna do this arpeggio lick I learned about"…… "now Im gonna string skip"…. "that really sucked, I guess Im no good". It's not natural to play that way, and IMO it's very unsatisfying.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 25, 2014,
#34
Quote by randomsaguy
I know that feel man, I guess we all were there when we first started doing improvising. A less vague explanation on how to get better at improvising than "learn more theory" would be something like this; yeah, first off, learn the solos.

However, "learning" solos doesn't just stop when you can play it fluently. You have to dissect it, solos are made up of a lot of parts/licks that make it what it is. Take every lick, and put it into a scale. If you're playing blues, which I assume you are, get to know all the pentatonic scales that blues guitarists like to use. Most of the licks you learn will fit into these. Once you've done this, it should help you get your head around the "essence" of improvising, so to speak. Knowing the scales and all the licks associated with them is really important.

Next, you'll want to be able to identify which key your song is in. Ear training, yeah? There are lots of tips on identifying the key of a song, I'm sure there are lots of them on this site and other forums on the internet. Knowing the chords of scales helps, but you can also just play a scale and see if it works. When I started out, I just played the major scale over a song over and over until I found the key it was in. Pentatonic scales can work as well, although the extra notes in the major scale make it easier to identify the key imo.

Now, after this, you just put it together. If you have backing track that is, say, in A minor, then start playing all your Minor Pentatonic licks over it, in the A Minor position. At first, it may seem like a huge, incoherent mess, but just keep at it. Eventually, you'll be switching between the licks much more fluently. As you get better, you'll start adding sections to your solos instead of just randomly playing, consciously thinking "Yeah, I'm gonna start off with a nice, slow little bend here, to get things started. Maybe play that cool lick I learned yesterday. Okay, time for a melody to make my solo more memorable. A long slide here would give it some character. Aaaaand I guess I'll end it off with a fast passage for some added grit". After you get this down, start expanding your knowledge of the fretboard, don't wanna get stuck in one position. Learn other scales, and where they are in relation to each other on the fretboard. To other people, the fretboard may be a vast, unexplored land of mystery. But to you, it should be your patio. This will allow you to play your solos up and down the neck with as much freedom and variety as you please. Just remember though, baby steps. Make sure you can comfortably improvise in one scale before you start memorizing dozens of them and get lost and demotivated when you can't apply everything you want to.

Last, but not least, don't beat yourself up if you think your solos suck. It's always healthy to acknowledge your shortcomings, because it allows you room to improve, but if you think your solos suck, ask yourself "why?" It's better to look at your solo and say "Okay, this tapping thing I tried doing here sounded pretty sh*t. I should try something else" than to just think to yourself that you suck, period.

About the issue of you playing alone, if you really can't find fellow muso's to jam with, you might wanna buy yourself an audio interface and record your own backtracks. That's what I do, and trust me, it's really fun doing it. It will help your improvising a LOT, plus you can write solos to your own songs, instead of jamming along to the many generic backtracks out there. Just saying, maybe the recording forum can give you some pointers if you're interested. I hope this helps you!


Thanks man! I appreciate this!

Yea, I want to record some of my own stuff. I got some cool riffs I'd like to record and such.
#35
Quote by GuitarMunky
I suggest that you forget the backing tracks, and instead play along with real bands. Learn the solos note for note, phrase for phrase. Capture the feel. Enjoy the experience… soak up the inspiration.

IME experience backing tracks mostly benefits the person that sold it to you. They are a product… a way for unknown musicians to make some money. They do sound cool sometimes, but they are generally a person sequencing and looping, which is not the same as a band playing together and interacting. That interaction is what you feed off of as a soloist. Likewise the band interacts with the soloist. You just don't get that with backing tracks, so you're forced to think and judge your way through it….. "ok now I'm gonna do this arpeggio lick I learned about"…… "now Im gonna string skip"…. "that really sucked, I guess Im no good". It's not natural to play that way, and IMO it's very unsatisfying.


I would just get my backing tracks off YouTube. I don't think I'd go as far as paying for one, anyways. Thanks for the advice though!
#36
Quote by Sabicas
I was where you are. I got the Guitar Scales Method software and put in a lot of time. After a couple of months, I was only maybe 1/3 through the course, but I just took off. I understood enough to start improvising. Seriously, that is the best software for guitarists wanting to get into improvising and understanding the theory behind scales, arpeggios, chord construction and progressions. It's play along and has an excellent grading system. You'll develop your ear and your timing and learn your fretboard as by-products.

I'm not claiming that I was great at improvisation after using the software. It just gave me the confidence and know-how to start experimenting and stop shaming myself.


Thanks man,

I'll definitely check it out!
#37
it's just the blues scale variation 4. Don't be silly....

The bottom scale is probably one of the auxiliery scale...I Cant remember exactly.
Who cares...I don't get bored and I don't know all the scales

The dominant pentatonic scale might harmonize over the V chord better, if you extend the chord. It has a maj3rd and a flat 7
If you wish play the -7 instead of a natural 6 in the major pentatonic.

The last I checked the V chord is a major chord.....That's why it's hit and miss for newbies
when they just play the minor pentatonic over that chord.
The pentatonic scale is not the blues scale.
It's one of those general misconception.

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?scchnam=Hungarian+Minor&get2=Get&t=0&choice=1
#38
^^^ We haven't talked about any chord progressions in this thread so I'm not sure what you are talking about.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#39
well if you're going to wing it over a chord and sound good. It's a good idea
to know what the arpeggios of the chord your playing over ..no?

If you actually click on the link instead of just shooting from the hips.
You'll know it has a list of grips of scale aside from the diatonic.
Someone from this site linked that in for me years ago......
I was done with doing things the old fashion way of explaining music.
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 26, 2014,
#40
Quote by smc818
I was done with doing things the old fashion way of explaining music.


Well that's definitely clear.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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