#1
I send superior drummer out to audio tracks, and then record the midi to process them.

Is it better the adjust the faders on the mixer in superior to not clipping levels and have them mixed volume wise that way? Or turn down the master volume and leave them as is or adjusted to how you want your kit mixed.
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#2
Also, what volume do you guys typically have your drum tracks peaking at on the master fader?
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#4
Quote by player o slayer
I send superior drummer out to audio tracks, and then record the midi to process them.

Is it better the adjust the faders on the mixer in superior to not clipping levels and have them mixed volume wise that way? Or turn down the master volume and leave them as is or adjusted to how you want your kit mixed.

Keep it below clipping. Always.

Peak volume isn't important as long as the mix balance sounds good, and in fact, it depends on the volume of all the other instruments. Do what your ears tell you is right. Use master compression to get the whole mix to the appropriate volume.
#5
But i mean, you gotta start somewhere right? Recording directly out of superior i dont want the signal too hot, i also dont want it too quiet. How the hell do i guess what volume the other instruments around it are gonna be at? lol.

im interested in how most people approach this. you open a new file, plop in superior drummer, write out the midi/velocity, then set your volumes within superior? Do you do it with the superior mixer or master? do you lower the faders in your DAW? What volume is generally a good starting place?

Would you do a demo around the midi, mix it like that. Then export audio for mixing/editing?

How do i figure out what volume my drums should be at?

So many questions....lol. Thank you to anyone who has the patience to help me haha.
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#6
There is a golden spot at which pre-amps record and I can't remember what it is... I think it's like -12dbrms

So keep your drums in line with that.
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#7
So in theory, i would start with my drums, peaking around -12dbfs, record them to audio tracks. and then record my DI instruments/vocals around -12, and then mix it all down together so the master fader is around -12 to -18dbfs? Of course these numbers will vary but that sounds about right?

Im trying to learn how some of you guys actually figure this stuff out, as far as recording volumes go. not mixing mastering volume, recording volume.
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#8
Yeah. The replication is best at around -12 rms. There are others on the forum that know way more about it than me, hopefully they can add to what I've said.
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#10
It really won't make a difference. If your snare needs to be hitting at -3 to cut through a wall of guitars, FINE. As long as you don't hear clipping, which you WILL HEAR if it clips, you're fine.

What I do is, send the midi to Superior, drums in their own tracks set so that the master fader is still in the green. Bring in the other instruments, readjust drum levels. EQ. Readjust levels again. DO NOT try to pre-mix without the other instruments unless you're ridiculously good - guitars will kill vocals, bass will kill kick, etc.

I'm also a fan of mixing with compression/limiting on the entire time, as opposed to finishing the mix, bouncing, and then finding out that the limiter is eating my snare.

But to answer your question: You can start by setting each drum with the peaks hitting at around -12, an average of -18, but don't be rigid about it. If you end up having to crank that snare to -3, or +3, or whatever - as long as it sounds good, it's fine. You'll know if you're too hot. Although of course, EQ before drastic volume pushes, obviously.
#11
Cool, everyones offered insightful advice, thanks everyone.

Quote by KevinGoetz
But to answer your question: You can start by setting each drum with the peaks hitting at around -12, an average of -18, but don't be rigid about it.


Do you do this with the superior mixer with each drum individually? Or use the external daw mixer to control each drum. not for mixing, just recording.

Also, for those that said record the DIs around -12 also; When i plug my guitar directly into my interface with no preamp gain, it hits around -3. they're passive pickups and not too close to the strings. How would i rectify this, turn down the fader when recording?
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#12
OH wait, you were asking about DIs? I apologize, I thought you were asking about the level of your drums! With your guitar, set your interface so that it's about as high as you can get it without clipping (your DI should have a clip indicator, usually a red light) and just go. Assuming you're using amp sims, I mean. There's usually a deficit of gain in amp sims, so you want it to be a bit on the hot side coming in. Does that make sense?

Edit: It may depend on the routing method used, but I just use the DAW faders to control drum volume. I haven't actually noticed a difference in sound between the DAW faders and the Superior faders.