Page 1 of 3
#1
Hi guys,

I have had this problem fro a while, now since i first started playing. AI have been told by a few others that, that when i play my strumming is stiff. And only recently,m i have noticed that my right hand biceps are beginning to hurt when i strum. I have heard something about strumming with the wrists but i can't seem to get around that. Any tips, guys?

Much appreciated!
#2
Just move your wrist instead of your elbow, or else you'll get tired fast and it won't sound very good. You need to be relaxed when playing, you can't feel tension on your arms (tension is kinda hard to control, so you must pay attention to that). Of course, when strumming you'll probably use your arm a bit, but the main movement must come from the wrist or it'll sound stiff and you'll probably look really tense to anyone watching
#3
Take it slow. Like, really slow. The wrist movement is the most important part, obviously. Some movement will come from the arm and elbow, but you have to keep those parts relaxed.
Join the 7 String Legion!

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#4
Ah, i see.. So just make sure all the strumming movement is coming from the wrist and not the elbow. Yeah, when i first started, i didn't really take much notice about the strumming too much. I was just focused on learning songs but now i am really beginning to see the consequences of not paying too much attention to strumming, when i first started lol
#5
Thats why some lessons are a good idea, the teacher will notice things like that immediately
#6
Quote by cloud360
Ah, i see.. So just make sure all the strumming movement is coming from the wrist and not the elbow. Yeah, when i first started, i didn't really take much notice about the strumming too much. I was just focused on learning songs but now i am really beginning to see the consequences of not paying too much attention to strumming, when i first started lol



If you want a good exercise I can post a link here it'll develop your strumming technique.

Watch this video!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCJFWdJd5yk


Note it's very important you use a metronome when working on your strumming technique. Take a strumming pattern you're working on, and put the metronome to a speed where you can play the strumming pattern at a perfect pace. It's great honestly doing these exercises helped me to build my rhythm chops up.

I just took a bunch of strumming patterns that I learned, and practiced them 5 minutes a day for each individual strumming pattern slowly, and as soon as I could play it perfectly I'd put the metronome up 5 BPM.

I'd highly recommend the off beat up strum exercises that he talks about in the video it will really improve your strumming technique as of what I know a lot of people have a hard time with up strums. Also do not become tense when strumming you have to be relaxed don't think too much just do it. When strumming you have to flick your wrist it's hard to explain, but if I find a video I'll post it up.

Also I noticed this with a lot of beginners (including my self) we tend to strum very hard, and not really take notice. This has also helped me out a lot I don't know if you're having this same problem but if you are this will solve it. Think of the pick as a brush strum softly, and loosely while holding the pick with a firm, but loose grip, and just let it brush across the strings. I hope this will solve your problems that you were having just remember to really relax while strumming because you have to be loose.

Also I forgot to make another suggestion don't try to rush you're training your hands to do a specific movement so be careful, and focused perfect practice makes perfect these things don't happen over night so you have to do it on a consistent basis!

EDIT:

I forgot to put another useful exercise that would benefit you if you're having problems with up strums. This one is very useful one I also love this pattern with 16th note strumming it's really good to use if you like dynamics, and want to spice up your rhythm playing. 1,a,2,a,3,a,4,a
U,D,U,D,U,D,U,D

It really improves your up strums I hope you found this post useful.
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 22, 2014,
#7
Quote by Black_devils
If you want a good exercise I can post a link here it'll develop your strumming technique.

Watch this video!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCJFWdJd5yk


Note it's very important you use a metronome when working on your strumming technique. Take a strumming pattern you're working on, and put the metronome to a speed where you can play the strumming pattern at a perfect pace. It's great honestly doing these exercises helped me to build my rhythm chops up.

I just took a bunch of strumming patterns that I learned, and practiced them 5 minutes a day for each individual strumming pattern slowly, and as soon as I could play it perfectly I'd put the metronome up 5 BPM.

I'd highly recommend the off beat up strum exercises that he talks about in the video it will really improve your strumming technique as of what I know a lot of people have a hard time with up strums. Also do not become tense when strumming you have to be relaxed don't think too much just do it. When strumming you have to flick your wrist it's hard to explain, but if I find a video I'll post it up.

Also I noticed this with a lot of beginners (including my self) we tend to strum very hard, and not really take notice. This has also helped me out a lot I don't know if you're having this same problem but if you are this will solve it. Think of the pick as a brush strum softly, and loosely while holding the pick with a firm, but loose grip, and just let it brush across the strings. I hope this will solve your problems that you were having just remember to really relax while strumming because you have to be loose.

Also I forgot to make another suggestion don't try to rush you're training your hands to do a specific movement so be careful, and focused perfect practice makes perfect these things don't happen over night so you have to do it on a consistent basis!

EDIT:

I forgot to put another useful exercise that would benefit you if you're having problems with up strums. This one is very useful one I also love this pattern with 16th note strumming it's really good to use if you like dynamics, and want to spice up your rhythm playing. 1,a,2,a,3,a,4,a
U,D,U,D,U,D,U,D

It really improves your up strums I hope you found this post useful.



Hey dude! Thanks for the link! Really loving the vid! However, i have come across one problem. In the video, he suggest that i should try just doing downstrums and then upstrums. However, when i try to do just the down strums, i end up kinda bringing my hand up to the the top of the fret as if i am doing a down/up/down/upmotion. The same thing happens to when i do just a up stroke. Is that normal? Not sure, if i managed to explain myself, properly. It's weird, because i can do the down/up/down/up strumming motion perfectly but when it comes to the single just down strumming or just up strumming, it's a bit different lol.

The metronome idea sounds great! Gonna try it out in a bit!
Last edited by cloud360 at Jan 26, 2014,
#8
Buy a strat....The set screws on the string's saddle will scrap the living hell out of your palm
if you strum up and down too hard or not using your wrist.

Practice palm muting. You can rest your hand on the bridge or string.
You get use to it after a while. Your hand is slightly above the strings when you don't
palm mute.

It's almost like a necessity at first if you have a floating whammy bar because if
you rest your hand to hard on it, It'll put pressure on the strings and make the guitar
sounds like it's out of tune. I compensate by resting my ring and pinky below the high
E string to give my hand an anchor point but still allow me to strum with my wrist.

Depending on the guitar. Sometimes I still have a habit of hooking my pinky
around one of the knobs to anchor my hand.
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 26, 2014,
#9
Quote by cloud360
Hey dude! Thanks for the link! Really loving the vid! However, i have come across one problem. In the video, he suggest that i should try just doing downstrums and then upstrums. However, when i try to do just the down strums, i end up kinda bringing my hand up to the the top of the fret as if i am doing a down/up/down/upmotion. The same thing happens to when i do just a up stroke. Is that normal? Not sure, if i managed to explain myself, properly. It's weird, because i can do the down/up/down/up strumming motion perfectly but when it comes to the single just down strumming or just up strumming, it's a bit different lol.

The metronome idea sounds great! Gonna try it out in a bit!



Yeah you kind of need to explain your self better I can't really get a visual of what you're saying in my head I'll post a link of how your strumming should look. Maybe that would end up helping you, and definitely use a metronome a lot of people that don't really practice with a metronome end up having shitty timing.

Plus it's useful when trying to practice correctly it gives you a guide on where your techniques at too. It can help you to play faster overall it will help to build a cleaner technique. Just remember you have to practice things slowly and perfectly in order to build really good chops so a metronome is good for that.

Here's a video that i'm pretty sure will solve your problem with how your wrist is suppose to be with strumming. Just remember to take your time there's no rush when it comes to things like this.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPkxzf7kDkE
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 26, 2014,
#10
Quote by Black_devils
Yeah you kind of need to explain your self better I can't really get a visual of what you're saying in my head I'll post a link of how your strumming should look. Maybe that would end up helping you, and definitely use a metronome a lot of people that don't really practice with a metronome end up having shitty timing.

Plus it's useful when trying to practice correctly it gives you a guide on where your techniques at too. It can help you to play faster overall it will help to build a cleaner technique. Just remember you have to practice things slowly and perfectly in order to build really good chops so a metronome is good for that.

Here's a video that i'm pretty sure will solve your problem with how your wrist is suppose to be with strumming. Just remember to take your time there's no rush when it comes to things like this.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPkxzf7kDkE


Ah, i thought as much. Basically, in the first link vid, the guy suggest a 1&2&3&4& (just down) pattern around 3.25 and then he suggest a 1&2&3&4& (just up) around 3.40.

The just down bit
When i try to strum just down like he does at 3.40, my strumming hand goes back up just as i am about to go and do my next down strum..
#11
Quote by cloud360
Ah, i thought as much. Basically, in the first link vid, the guy suggest a 1&2&3&4& (just down) pattern around 3.25 and then he suggest a 1&2&3&4& (just up) around 3.40.

The just down bit
When i try to strum just down like he does at 3.40, my strumming hand goes back up just as i am about to go and do my next down strum..



So when you're doing the all down strum exercise. (4 down strums to a bar) your hand just goes up again after the down strum? If so that's completely normal unless your hitting the strings in the processes of your hands going up.

Usually when doing down strums I just keep my hand down after doing a down strum until the next beat comes i'll quickly raise my hand for the next down strum. Honestly I don't see any harm in doing that unless your hitting the strings in the process like I've stated above. ^^^
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 26, 2014,
#12
Quote by Black_devils
So when you're doing the all down strum exercise. (4 down strums to a bar) your hand just goes up again after the down strum? If so that's completely normal unless your hitting the strings in the processes of your hands going up.

Usually when doing down strums I just keep my hand down after doing a down strum until the next beat comes i'll quickly raise my hand for the next down strum. Honestly I don't see any harm in doing that unless your hitting the strings in the process like I've stated above. ^^^


Yeah, my hand kinda goes up and sometimes it hits the strings in the process as my hand is going up...

I can't seem to avoid hitting the strings as i bring my hand up for the next down strum
Last edited by cloud360 at Jan 26, 2014,
#13
Quote by cloud360
Yeah, my hand kinda goes up and sometimes it hits the strings in the process as my hand is going up...



Mhmm then that's a huge problem that you need to work on ASAP. What i'd recommend you to do is to really focus on avoiding to hit the strings when you raise your hand up to return to the down strum. It's all muscle memory you have to retrain your hand not to do that like I said getting a metronome, and playing along with it would solve this problem.

You could just put it on 60 Bmp or whatever speed you can do the exercise perfectly, and comfortably on. If you don't have one I Insist on you getting one this way you can retrain your hand to not hit the strings, but for now just practice the 4 down strums to a bar exercise slowly, and carefully while making sure to avoid hitting the strings while your hand raises up.


Just make sure to be focused on not hitting the strings!
#14
Quote by Black_devils
Mhmm then that's a huge problem that you need to work on ASAP. What i'd recommend you to do is to really focus on avoiding to hit the strings when you raise your hand up to return to the down strum. It's all muscle memory you have to retrain your hand not to do that like I said getting a metronome, and playing along with it would solve this problem.

You could just put it on 60 Bmp or whatever speed you can do the exercise perfectly, and comfortably on. If you don't have one I Insist on you getting one this way you can retrain your hand to not hit the strings, but for now just practice the 4 down strums to a bar exercise slowly, and carefully while making sure to avoid hitting the strings while your hand raises up.


Just make sure to be focused on not hitting the strings!


Ah, i always thought there was something off with when my had would do that. Thanks for that. Yeah, i have got a metonome. Might just try it out now
#15
Quote by cloud360
Ah, i always thought there was something off with when my had would do that. Thanks for that. Yeah, i have got a metonome. Might just try it out now


Playing with a metronome is very beneficial practice everything with it, and you'll begin to see instant improvement in your playing I can't stress how important it is..
#16
Hi guys,

This is something that has been bugging me for some time, now. Whenever i try to strum with a pick, the sound of the pick hitting the strings, echoes. I have tried holding the pick in all sort of different ways but nothing works. Someone once told me that, over time i will be able to strum with a pick without the pick making a noise as it hits the string but i haven't seen no sign of reduction of noise from the pick hitting the strings. Any help, guys?
#17
Cloud,

it doesn't sound like you're fluid, man. To some degree, the pick will always make some sort of noise, that's just how it is.

Sometimes a thinner pick will help, < 0.8 mm, but I'd rather you work on technique. When you pick is it getting stuck between the strings briefly as you go down/up?

Does it sound worse on the down stroke or the up stroke?

When you're picking, do you have a lot of tension in your hand and arms? Or are you loose and letting the pick fall?


A video would help, so would a sound clip. It's kind of hard to pinpoint these things via internet.


edit: I'd like to add that you don't HAVE to use a pick. When I strum, I use just my hand. That's a stylistic choice and if I want to strum with a pick, it sounds perfectly normal. So, master the pick strum, then explore different styles if it simply isn't for you.
Last edited by johnturner9 at Feb 1, 2014,
#18
Quote by johnturner9
Cloud,

it doesn't sound like you're fluid, man. To some degree, the pick will always make some sort of noise, that's just how it is.

Sometimes a thinner pick will help, < 0.8 mm, but I'd rather you work on technique. When you pick is it getting stuck between the strings briefly as you go down/up?

Does it sound worse on the down stroke or the up stroke?

When you're picking, do you have a lot of tension in your hand and arms? Or are you loose and letting the pick fall?


A video would help, so would a sound clip. It's kind of hard to pinpoint these things via internet.


edit: I'd like to add that you don't HAVE to use a pick. When I strum, I use just my hand. That's a stylistic choice and if I want to strum with a pick, it sounds perfectly normal. So, master the pick strum, then explore different styles if it simply isn't for you.



Yeah, i am using a thin pick Dunlop .38 mm ) pick. It sounds just the same going up and down. Yeah, i think it gets between each string briefly as i go down. Well, i think i am now moving the strumming with my wrist. It doesn't feel like it's coming from my elbow, anymore. Yeah, i would like to eventually strum without a pick but i have heard that i need to get this basic motion down before i can try and experiment
#19
I hate to say this but i feel like giving up tbh. I have spent hours and hours looking for a youtube vid that answers my problem.
#20
Quote by cloud360
I hate to say this but i feel like giving up tbh. I have spent hours and hours looking for a youtube vid that answers my problem.



I think your problem is that you strum too hard.. By the way do you even practice with a metronome? Not to mention if your pick is getting caught up in the strings too much then it's most likely your technique. I used to have that problem with up strums, but now I angle my pick so it just goes through the strings like butter.

Your pick is most likely getting caught in between the strings because of the resistance in not angling it. Just try, and angle your pick when strumming that might help you out.. It could be a lot of things I mean if your tense when strumming and not relaxed then that could be your problem like the guy up there said.

^^^ We can't know your real problem unless you record your playing sadly. There's just way to many possibilities you know? I mean it could be how hard or loosely your holding the pick. Usually when I strum I hold the pick loosely, but with a firm grip think of strumming like painting with a brush you do it relaxed, but gently..
I can see why people would want to quit right away just because of the fact that if you don't learn the right way then it's a major bitch! But in the end we all just find things that work for us it's more of a trial, and error process so don't just give up just because of the fact that you can't get it right away.
Last edited by Black_devils at Feb 1, 2014,
#21
Quote by Black_devils
I think your problem is that you strum too hard.. By the way do you even practice with a metronome? Not to mention if your pick is getting caught up in the strings too much then it's most likely your technique. I used to have that problem with up strums, but now I angle my pick so it just goes through the strings like butter.

Your pick is most likely getting caught in between the strings because of the resistance in not angling it. Just try, and angle your pick when strumming that might help you out.. It could be a lot of things I mean if your tense when strumming and not relaxed then that could be your problem like the guy up there said.

^^^ We can't know your real problem unless you record your playing sadly. There's just way to many possibilities you know? I mean it could be how hard or loosely your holding the pick. Usually when I strum I hold the pick loosely, but with a firm grip think of strumming like painting with a brush you do it relaxed, but gently..
I can see why people would want to quit right away just because of the fact that if you don't learn the right way then it's a major bitch! But in the end we all just find things that work for us it's more of a trial, and error process so don't just give up just because of the fact that you can't get it right away.



Yeah, i have tried the metornome idea. My only problem is the quality of the strumming. It's really annoying. I think your right - it does feel like the pick gets caught in between the strings before it hits the next string (when i am strumming chords). You mentioned something about an angle..How/what exact angle should i place it at/; I know these things are hard to explain over text ha

It's really frustrating because it's something sooo small hah. Unfortunately, my video camera function isn';t working but i managed to record a snippet of what exactly is going on. Forgive me inn advance, i wasn't concentrating on finger placement for the chord. Was too busy focusing on the strumming.

https://soundcloud.com/bs9000/new-recording-76
#22
I'm not sure if this has been mentioned at all, but don't raise the BPM on the metronome until you can play it at 'x' speed perfectly. If you allow yourself to be sloppy or cut corners, your playing will suffer for it.

From the recording, it sounds like you're rushing the offbeats more than anything. It almost feels like you're trying to get your pick back to the low E to prepare the next downstroke.

Most importantly, don't stress out about it. If you start stressing about not being able to do something, just stop practicing altogether for a while. The human mind rather dislikes monotonous exercises and such, and it will try to resist what it doesn't like that much. What you need to do is to find a reward that you can condition yourself to when you do accomplish a goal, such as playing your favorite song or hugging a stuffed animal or whatever. It will make it so that you start looking forward to practicing, and you will have less resistance when it comes to the more intense stuff.
Join the 7 String Legion!

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.

Messiaen is Magical


Official Approval
This message has been approved by:

Mister A.J.
Head of the Department of Redundancy Department
Mister A.J.
Last edited by Mister A.J. at Feb 1, 2014,
#23
Quote by cloud360
Yeah, i have tried the metornome idea. My only problem is the quality of the strumming. It's really annoying. I think your right - it does feel like the pick gets caught in between the strings before it hits the next string (when i am strumming chords). You mentioned something about an angle..How/what exact angle should i place it at/; I know these things are hard to explain over text ha

It's really frustrating because it's something sooo small hah. Unfortunately, my video camera function isn';t working but i managed to record a snippet of what exactly is going on. Forgive me inn advance, i wasn't concentrating on finger placement for the chord. Was too busy focusing on the strumming.

https://soundcloud.com/bs9000/new-recording-76



How long have you been playing? I can probably help you with your problem.. What kind of guitar do you have? (Post a link with your response) I think your guitar might be your problem most beginners end up buying a shitty guitar when they first start out not knowing anything.. But most importantly how long have you been playing for if you answer that one question I can most likely solve your problem right here, and right now.
#24
Quote by Black_devils
How long have you been playing? I can probably help you with your problem.. What kind of guitar do you have? (Post a link with your response) I think your guitar might be your problem most beginners end up buying a shitty guitar when they first start out not knowing anything.. But most importantly how long have you been playing for if you answer that one question I can most likely solve your problem right here, and right now.


Well, I have been playing since like june, last year. I will try and find a pic of the guitar google, later. It's a classical guitar tho. I was given it as a present. Hoping to but a real acoustic guitar later once, I am
Comfortable playing.
#26
Quote by cloud360
Well, I have been playing since like june, last year. I will try and find a pic of the guitar google, later. It's a classical guitar tho. I was given it as a present. Hoping to but a real acoustic guitar later once, I am
Comfortable playing.



Are you using any specific course to learn or what? Or are you just learning by clicking on random videos on youtube? If so I'd highly advise you to work through this beginners course. Justin is a great teacher, and his course is one of the best on the net it's very structured. From listening to your recording you play out of time..

You pause, and don't keep a steady rhythm this is why you need to use a metronome dude. Rhythm guitar is all about keeping a tight sound. I really would advise you to take this course, and go through it stage by stage slowly!

http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-000-BeginnersCourse.php


Get a strong understanding of the basics man because with out that you can't really turn into a good player. You should also join the forum. there's been folks on there that have been playing for years. They give great advice they've really helped me with my playing when I first started out. In fact that's where I've gathered all my great tips, and exercises from..

Also look into getting a better guitar maybe a steel stringed acoustic. If you want I could recommend if so here's a link it's a really great guitar

http://www.amazon.com/Yamaha-FG700S-Acoustic-Guitar/dp/B000FIZISQ

It comes with low action straight out the box if you can't afford a setup.
Last edited by Black_devils at Feb 2, 2014,
#27
As has been said many many times... get a metronome.

Practice your timing. Put your guitar down to start with. Turn on your metronome, not too fast but not too slow either somewhere around 60-80 bpm should be okay click click click. listen to the click and count them one two three four one two three four. Tap your foot, rock your body, nod your head, and use your hand to tap out the count on your thigh. One two three four. Don't try too hard just listen to the pulse, relax, and feel it in your entire body.

Do this for a few minutes then pick up your guitar. The video posted on the first page is good. Deaden the strings with your frethand and just strum the strings to the click one two three four each stroke going downward. Just deaden the strings so you can only work on the right hand. Don't over think it though and don't tense up, relax and just feel the pulse. Nod your head to the count keep the body rocking and just worry about strumming the first count ONE two three four ONE two three four. Then after a minute add a strum on the third beat. ONE two THREE four One two THREE four. Then add a strum on every beat ONE TWO THREE FOUR.

It should just be a relaxed easy motion, don't over think it and don't try too hard or you will tense up, just let the pulse of the click click click click take over your body and completely consume your mind. Don't worry about your technique or if you miss a beat or get of time just stop strumming for a moment to listen to the click click click and then in a relaxed easy way start strumming again.

Remember with the left hand just hold the guitar gently and rest your fingers over the strings to deaden them. It's all about your right hand and feeling a steady rhythm through your whole body.
Si
#28
Quote by Black_devils
Are you using any specific course to learn or what? Or are you just learning by clicking on random videos on youtube? If so I'd highly advise you to work through this beginners course. Justin is a great teacher, and his course is one of the best on the net it's very structured. From listening to your recording you play out of time..

You pause, and don't keep a steady rhythm this is why you need to use a metronome dude. Rhythm guitar is all about keeping a tight sound. I really would advise you to take this course, and go through it stage by stage slowly!

http://justinguitar.com/en/BC-000-BeginnersCourse.php


Get a strong understanding of the basics man because with out that you can't really turn into a good player. You should also join the forum. there's been folks on there that have been playing for years. They give great advice they've really helped me with my playing when I first started out. In fact that's where I've gathered all my great tips, and exercises from..

Also look into getting a better guitar maybe a steel stringed acoustic. If you want I could recommend if so here's a link it's a really great guitar

http://www.amazon.com/Yamaha-FG700S-Acoustic-Guitar/dp/B000FIZISQ

It comes with low action straight out the box if you can't afford a setup.


Well, untill just about last month, i wasn't following any course. I was just trying to practice along to songs. I just started jusin guitar's course on youtube. I have learnt some chords off it, so far. I can form the chords but i just can't seem to even strum one chord smoothly. But to start learning rhythm guitar, don't i need to know how to strum properly? Not sure, if you could hear in my recordings but i can't even strum properly (e.g. just one down strum), as my strumming just sounds shit. I have tried angling the plectrum at differnet angels, tried holding it softly/gently etc, but nothing has worked...
#29
EDDDIIIT: woah. Ok, just tried to practice with a metronome and i think...and i think....my sturmming sounded a bit like normal strumming

Here is my strumming downwards with 60BPM (E chord) (metronome)..Something still sounds odd..the sound of the plectrum hitting the strings is too loud..i think...I can hear the plectrum hitting the strings but not the strings ringing...

https://soundcloud.com/bs9000/new-recording-78-1

Here is my strumming downwards with 60BPM with my palm covering the frets

https://soundcloud.com/bs9000/new-recording-76-1
#30
Quote by cloud360
EDDDIIIT: woah. Ok, just tried to practice with a metronome and i think...and i think....my sturmming sounded a bit like normal strumming

Here is my strumming downwards with 60BPM (E chord) (metronome)..Something still sounds odd..the sound of the plectrum hitting the strings is too loud..i think...I can hear the plectrum hitting the strings but not the strings ringing...

https://soundcloud.com/bs9000/new-recording-78-1

Here is my strumming downwards with 60BPM with my palm covering the frets

https://soundcloud.com/bs9000/new-recording-76-1



Yeah dude you might just be strumming hard is the problem. Just take it slow with the metronome when practicing. Other then that 20Tigers gave some pretty clean advice about this. I just don't know how anyone can explain it easier then what has already been posted.

Like I said in my previous post just follow the course don't skip around do it each stage slowly until you understand, and can play songs off stage he's posted in his song book. I also think that your guitar might be the problem the E chord you're playing doesn't even sound like an E chord you might need to buy an new guitar ASAP.
#31
Quote by Black_devils
Yeah dude you might just be strumming hard is the problem. Just take it slow with the metronome when practicing. Other then that 20Tigers gave some pretty clean advice about this. I just don't know how anyone can explain it easier then what has already been posted.

Like I said in my previous post just follow the course don't skip around do it each stage slowly until you understand, and can play songs off stage he's posted in his song book. I also think that your guitar might be the problem the E chord you're playing doesn't even sound like an E chord you might need to buy an new guitar ASAP.



Yeah, i really like 20tigers advice about letting the rhythm flow through the body. So that hard sound of the plectrum against the strings (like in the first recording link) will go away after i have practiced strumming with the metronome for a while? And will i be able to strum smoothly without it sounding choppy/and without the plectrum getting caught up between the strings like it does in the previous recordings through the use of practicing with a metronome?

Yeah, i am planning to go through his whole course. hah, i know, right? I need to buy a new guitar asap, defo.
#32
Your guitar might be okay - are you using an electronic tuner to tune each string? Use it before every session. And wipe down your strings after every session with a clean dry rag.

What kind of pick are you using? If it is too hard then it can make strumming tricky because you have to have some give in your fingers. For strumming try a lighter pick that has more flexibility until you get the hang of it.

Keep practicing the strumming for at least 10 mins or so everyday. You'll get there. Just be regular about your practice.
Si
#33
Quote by 20Tigers
Your guitar might be okay - are you using an electronic tuner to tune each string? Use it before every session. And wipe down your strings after every session with a clean dry rag.

What kind of pick are you using? If it is too hard then it can make strumming tricky because you have to have some give in your fingers. For strumming try a lighter pick that has more flexibility until you get the hang of it.

Keep practicing the strumming for at least 10 mins or so everyday. You'll get there. Just be regular about your practice.


I know my guitar was tuned by a friend like a year ago but i think that's about it...I am using a Dunlop 0.38 pick...Yeah, hopefully..
#34
Your guitar is very out of tune by the sound of those clips, use a tuner to tune it daily. That's an important part for maintaining an instrument, to keep an even tension on the neck.

It seems like you're getting the hang of it, but what's the angle of your pick look like relative to the strings?

Perpendicular? Or a slight angle?

It sounds like you might be pinching the pick with your thumb and first finger too hard. See if relaxing the tension helps. Also, picks respond differently to nylon strings than they do steel, but I don't think that's the issue here.
#35
Yeah you almost definitely do not have to buy a new guitar.

You do have to get yourself a digital tuner and use it every time you sit down to play.

Get a couple sets of D'addario classical strings while you're at it.

a headstock tuner is great. It's small and you can clip it on to the end of your guitar headstock and just leave it there. You don't have to worry about losing it or hunting around for it. Just turn it on tune the guitar turn it off then practice. Easy.

Until you get a digital tuner you can also download an app that will let you tune your guitar using your smartphone. UG sell one I think and there are also free ones out there too.

If you want to make any progress it is very important you keep your guitar in tune. It allows you to be encouraged by your progress and you will hear your mistakes more clearly. It is essential. I can not stress this enough.
Si
#36
Quote by johnturner9
Your guitar is very out of tune by the sound of those clips, use a tuner to tune it daily. That's an important part for maintaining an instrument, to keep an even tension on the neck.

It seems like you're getting the hang of it, but what's the angle of your pick look like relative to the strings?

Perpendicular? Or a slight angle?

It sounds like you might be pinching the pick with your thumb and first finger too hard. See if relaxing the tension helps. Also, picks respond differently to nylon strings than they do steel, but I don't think that's the issue here.


I will defo look into purchasing a tuner. I dunno..in the recent recording (the one where i used a metronome), i was holding the pick straight towards the strings..Shall i be holding it at a different angle? So after perhaps a month or two of just strumming to a metromone, i take it my hand will be as relaxed as hell, in order to strum smoothly?
#37
Get a guitar teacher?

It sounds you have quite the bad habits, and for a relatively begining guitar player, you can't have a loose unstable base, cause things can only get worse.

Most of the things can be fixed within 2 months if someone can monitor what you do.

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#38
You mentioned your wrist hurting. The way you strum the guitar can actually hurt the wrist. It's know as an Extensor Carpi Ulnaris and Tendon Subluxation. This basically is overuse of the wrist, and strumming it the wrong way will lead to this injury, a friend of mine had it, and could not play guitar for 6 months and had to have surgery. Best to get rid of that habit. Best of luck.
#39
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Get a guitar teacher?

It sounds you have quite the bad habits, and for a relatively begining guitar player, you can't have a loose unstable base, cause things can only get worse.

Most of the things can be fixed within 2 months if someone can monitor what you do.



I agree and i am hoping to do so, when i have enough money to start taking lessons
#40
Hey man, is it getting easier for you?


The best way I can describe picking angle is to have the side of your palm that's connected with your pinky closer to the strings than your thumb.

Look at this picture:

http://www.chordbuddy.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/strumming.png

See how his palm is turned relative to the guitar and how this alters the pick's mode of travel? It creates more "give" and less resistance, which should diminish that "click" you hear from the plectrum's material hitting the string. Do not dig into the strings as you strum, keep it fluid and maintain the angle - most of all, practice.

Don't over-do it or you might cause forearm fatigue, just play with different ranges and find the sound you like. Remember to be loose, you should be able to completely relax your hand. Comfort/looseness is not only important for playing pain-free but is also the basis for many techniques.

Keep us updated. Hope I helped.
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