#1
I wanted to make a program to list all the chords that fit in a given key, and I have it find all the chords starting with a note in the scale. So far I have
-The major/minor chords (using the 1st,3rd,and 5th note of whatever scale is relative to the key)
-7th chords
-6th chords
-Sustained chords
-9th chords

Are there any chords I'm missing besides inversions?
#3
Diminished and augmented triads are a notable absence.

But yeah, making a list of all the chords would be incredibly time-consuming.
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#4
No such thing as 'sustained' chords. The term is suspended and there are two types; suspended 4ths (sus) and suspended 2nd (sus2) It's where the 3rd of a triad (the note that makes it major or minor) MOVES to the next degree higher or lower.

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#7
Quote by zack7521
I wanted to make a program to list all the chords that fit in a given key, and I have it find all the chords starting with a note in the scale. So far I have
-The major/minor chords (using the 1st,3rd,and 5th note of whatever scale is relative to the key)
-7th chords
-6th chords
-Sustained chords
-9th chords

Are there any chords I'm missing besides inversions?

  • Triads
  • Suspended Chords
  • Add chords
  • Seventh Chords
  • Extended Chords
  • Altered Chords
  • Slash chords (and inversions)
  • Polychords


It's not an exhaustive list, I'm sure there are a bunch of chord types I've never even heard of, but that about covers the general categories of "types" of chords, under each category you will have a set of specific chords. For example under Triads you would have four chords - Major, minor, augmented, diminished and even more chords that would fall into the "seventh chords" category.
Si
#8
Although a little bit specific, you're actually talking about chords "diatonic to a key" rather than "in a key". You can play whatever chord you want and still stay in a key.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
well, there's dominants, major #11s, major natural 11s, major b5, major 13 (no 5), major #11 13, minor 11, minor b9, minor #7...

I'd spend my time learning these on the instrument before trying to come with a way to avoid learning how to find and name them.
#10
I'd focus more on learning how tones function in a key and how chords are built as opposed to learning how to name all of the chords. Doing this will allow you to build these chords on the fly instead of trying to memorize everything, and give you much more functional tools to work with.
#11
Every chord is allowed in a key.

If you only go by diatonic, then you wouldn't even be able to play a 12 bar blues

Not to mention you'd be writing of almost every classical and jazz piece in existence.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 22, 2014,
#12
Classical and Jazz music are about as far from diatonic as it gets. Open a RealBook and see if you can find a song that spends more than 8 bars in a single key.

But to your point, not even Top 40 radio has very much diatonic music. It's extremely unusual for a song not to contain any accidentals as chord tones.
#13
check chord chemistry. by ted greene..he has a line in it .."..its better to know a few chords and know how to use them than knowing a thousand chords and not know how to use them.."

a study of diatonic harmony and theory would be a good start..if you learn the inversions of all the 3 and 4 note chords in all keys .. and then learn how to alter each chord .. (this will take some time) then study some voice leading and melodic applications - chord melodies...that should keep you busy for several years at least...

on top of all the above .. you will learn that many chords may have several names and have several qualities all depending on context of use...(DMA7b5 = E13 / Ami7 = C6)

a list of chords alone could well extend into hundreds and many will have more questions than answers on where and when to use them..

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Jan 25, 2014,