#1
So i just realized that if I practice a part/solo that im stuck on too much that my fingers actually become stiff and the part actually sounds less accurate and fluid, any suggestions on how to lessen this effect, granted i am learning the second solo to master of puppets its nojoke
#4
Just make sure your technique is right and that you're not tensing up. Only practice at a tempo where you feel 100% comfortable. If that means practicing dead slow, so be it. Give it some time.
baab
#5
though alot of people dont like to admit it, there is such a thing as practicing too much. after about 2 hours, fatigue starts settling in. when you start feeling a little bit tired, its good to take a 30 minute break and stretch your hands before continuing. also as people have said, its never a good idea to practice something over your limits. Tendonitis aint fun at a young age.
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#6
There is a very interesting thread on "classicalguitardelcamp.com" Regarding learning motor skills.

It's interesting that you only need 2 - 3 minutes a day on a given technique to improve.


"There are about 50 movement forms for the right hand, from simple thumb strokes to more complex arpeggios, tremolo, and various scale fingerings. Many of them can be very effectively improved with as little as 2-3 minutes daily on each"

http://www.classicalguitardelcamp.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=75850&start=15
#8
Quote by se012101
^ Thanks for posting that link. That was really interesting stuff.


Yeah I found it fascinating, did you read the author of the thread?

She was a dance instructor using these practice methods for "motor learning". Then as a beginner Classical Guitarist she is asking if anyone applies these to guitar. Seems people do.


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#9
Quote by wiggedy
Yeah I found it fascinating, did you read the author of the thread?

She was a dance instructor using these practice methods for "motor learning". Then as a beginner Classical Guitarist she is asking if anyone applies these to guitar. Seems people do.


.


Yeah, I read the whole thread. It was really good stuff, and I was eating it up. I've actually incorporated one of her theories about randomization into my practice. I will normally work on each thing for about 10 minutes. I'll work on 3 things for 10 mins each, before taking a 5-10 minute break. So I tried taking 3 different parts I was working on learning, work on each for 5 minutes, then loop back around and work them again for 5 mins each. Too early to really tell how it's working, but I think I might be seeing some early hints that it could be a keeper.

In general, that is a great forum. I've been reading quite a bit of it since you posted that link, and I've been getting all kinds of insights. Thanks again.