#1
Does anyone know any good and in depth websites or reading material focused around counterpoint harmony? Any help is much appreciated.
#2
If you can stomach it, then The Study of Counterpoint by Fux is good.
Bach liked it, Haydn learned from it and Beethoven quoted it.
It requires you to do a lot of work and there isn't always a correct answer.
Some people don't like the writing style (It seems run on sentences were well liked in 1725) but it does give you a solid foundation in 2, 3 and 4 voice writing. Some of the other guys could probably give you a better recommendation for a beginner counterpoint book, but I've only ever used this one so I can't compare it with any of the modern ones.
At the end of the day though counterpoint's counterpoint and you going to have to do a bunch of exercises either way.


I got The Craft of Tonal Counterpoint by Thomas Benjamin for Christmas and it's pretty good.
It only uses examples by Bach and focuses more on practical applications than strict exercises.
I'm not sure I'd get this unless you're already familiar with some basic counterpoint, it might be a bit daunting otherwise.
It's good for helping you learn to actually do things with counterpoint after you did all those exercises.
#3
Thank you. I am gong through Fux's book and I've noticed something; the first exercise with a cantus firmus and counterpoint are listed as the staves being in alto-clef and soprano-clef, but when I read the paragraph that explains what Joseph does, it does not match up with those clefs. Is this an error in the book or am I simply lacking some knowledge of staves?
#4
Are there treble or bass clefs written after the alto and soprano clefs? In certain translations of old texts they use the clefs which the examples were originally written in followed by clefs which modern students are more familiar with, and the examples are written on the stave with the latter in mind.

Jeppesen's Counterpoint is way better than Fux by the way. It has material on free writing without a cantus firmus, imitative counterpoint canon and fugue. Fux is just species exercise after species exercise (At least the extract of the Gradus from 'Study of Counterpoint' is).
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Last edited by Nietsche at Jan 23, 2014,
#5
Quote by Nietsche
Are there treble or bass clefs written after the alto and soprano clefs? In certain translations of old texts they use the clefs which the examples were originally written in followed by clefs which modern students are more familiar with, and the examples are written on the stave with the latter in mind.

Jeppesen's Counterpoint is way better than Fux by the way.


Yes, there are the original clefs, as described in the passage, and then a line followed by treble clefs on both lines.

So, you're saying I should read that one? >.>
#6
Quote by Morphogenesis26
So, you're saying I should read that one? >.>


Well I think it's better but I suck at counterpoint so you probably should ignore me.
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#7
Quote by Nietsche
Well I think it's better but I suck at counterpoint so you probably should ignore me.


Then I shall read them both!
#8
Quote by Duaneclapdrix
Bach liked it,


Not enough to use it in his actual teaching though.

According to his autobiography, Wagner learned counterpoint by instruction in Fugue writing from one of his teachers. At first he was a bit lazy, but he promised his teacher sincerely that he would put everything he had into it, so one morning his teacher sent for him, sat him down and made him write out a Fugue from the start while looking over his shoulder and commenting all the while. After that episode he had no further difficulties
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#9
The Well-Tempered Clavier I & II are all you need :>
You might could use some double modals.