#2
Yes, it can. It would need to be very loud though. What mic were you using, where was it, and what amp were you using?
#3
It isn't clipping digitally?
You sure?

Well it must be clipping analogically then.
A mic could clip but it's unlikely, they tent to be able to stand a lot of volume.

Could your guitar amp be clipping your signal?
Could your pre be clipping your signal?
How can you tell it's not clipping digitally?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
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Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
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#4
Quote by tim_mop
Yes, it can. It would need to be very loud though. What mic were you using, where was it, and what amp were you using?


It was an shure SM57, just recorded in my room with the mic placed very close to the speaker using a combo JCM900 single speaker. I was on the 'clean channel' with a bit of gain to get a crunchy sound and it was indeed pretty loud.
#5
Quote by Spambot_2
It isn't clipping digitally?
You sure?

Well it must be clipping analogically then.
A mic could clip but it's unlikely, they tent to be able to stand a lot of volume.

Could your guitar amp be clipping your signal?
Could your pre be clipping your signal?
How can you tell it's not clipping digitally?


Maybe I'm not really sure about it, but all meters on the audio interface never went red and also the signal doesn't go over the top visually.
#6
It didn't sound like digital clipping. The test would be to pull the 57 further away. I think the 57 clips at like 114dB so it's possible to clip it. It could also be speaker cone distortion or power amp distortion.
#7
Quote by tim_mop
It didn't sound like digital clipping. The test would be to pull the 57 further away. I think the 57 clips at like 114dB so it's possible to clip it. It could also be speaker cone distortion or power amp distortion.


So what's the best method to record, lower volume en keep iet close or lots of volume but further away? And I mean 'best method' in your opnion, their probably isn't one right method.
#8
Quote by tim_mop
It didn't sound like digital clipping. The test would be to pull the 57 further away. I think the 57 clips at like 114dB so it's possible to clip it. It could also be speaker cone distortion or power amp distortion.
That distortion most likely comes from the amp itself, and is accentuated by the near mic position.
Get your amp very clean at the same volume if it doesn't run into power tube distortion, and when you're sure it's 100% clean test the thing again.
It'll most likely sound clean in the recording, too, so the problem most likely is in the amp.
If it isn't, check either your pre or your ADC.

C'm on, my statement was an euphemism.
You would probably harm a dynamic mic by overloading but thing is, you'll harm yourself first:
dynamic mics have insanely high max SPL levels, but you don't see these ratings because they're made from calculations and not actual tests, and calculations require work, which require money.
Why don't they test it?
Well it's both dangerous and hard to produce an SPL higher than 150db.
Seriously, if you cranked your amp that loud your ears would still hurt.

Cheap dynamic microphone sound bad, but they don't have a low max SPL rating wither.
114db is a decent condenser/ribbon mic max SPL level, but it isn't even close to a dynamic mic's.

Ah yeah, last thing, SM58s are rated at 180db SPL.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#9
^ah my bad, I've been reading tech specs for a number of mics, think 114 was the u87! And I'm fairly sure I have distorted that with a bass amp before!

Given that, it's most likely the amp/speaker distorting. Do what Spambot said. Also listen to your amp from the position your mic is, that'll give you the best idea of the sound the mic will pick up!
#10
I mean, i use a 57 to mic my 6505+ head into a marshall 4x12 at some pretty intense volumes. it doesn't take much pre amp gain at all to get a good signal.

I record at around 12 oclock on the peavey head, with 1 or two mics right on the grille cloth. Clipping only occurs when i crank my pre amp which is unnecessary.
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#11
^^ I miced a bass amp once with an SM57 and another time with a condenser, and both times while not really clipping, there was a nasty big lower region hump, which forced the entire recording to the background.

I EQued it out, but it was not noticeable at all from hearing it from the amp itself.

I read up on it a bit, and it seems micing bass amps apparently is not the easiest of things.

I now usually DI bass, so haven't have much experience with micing them, since I don't seem to be able to hear this pre-recording

Anyways next week I'm coincidentally trying it again with an orange bass amp.

The bass player really wants his sound, because he plays sludge kind of metal and his bass is big part of the sound.

So we will see this time how it goes

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jan 24, 2014,