#1
I started playing guitar a few months ago, am a bass player by heart, and I now am pretty decent in playing the non-barre chords and switching between them.
Now I'm trying to advance towards barre chords and power chords, but I'm doing a horrible job and I just can't figure out how to practice and advance playing these.

First off, what do I do first, power chords or barre chords?
My positioning with the power chords is still very inaccurate and slow, and my finger strength isn't quite what it should be to be able to play barre chords.

Then, once I have figured out how to play a certain power chord, my switching to an other power chord just doesn't seem to cut it. I miss the chord nearly all the time.
It's like I do not have the control I need over my fingers, especially my pinkie.

These problems all cause me to just go back to the basic chords. While I can play a decent amount of songs using them, I can never do anything advanced and I'm just stuck in my same rythm.

How do I advance in learning to play guitar?
Does anybody know any solutions or is anybody able to give me tips?
Would be much appreciated, thank you!
#2
The most efficient way is to do barre chords, after all a power chord is simply part of a full barre chord - the bottom 2 or 3 notes.

That means if you learn to play a particular barre chord you've automatically learned how to play the powerchord equivalent, you just don't play all the notes. It will take a bit of time but everything on the guitar takes time, sadly most things won't simply click overnight especially early on.
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#3
Yes definitely learn barre chords first, powerchords will be much easier to transition to than the other way around. Barre chords are just extremely useful, with them you'll be able to play basically anything you want without having to worry about capos or open strings. My advice would be don't beat yourself up if you can't get a great F or B/A# at first, those are the hardest ones, rather try getting good barres at frets 5-9 first then move down as you're stronger and have the technique down. Good barre chords can take a lot of time to develop - for most at least a couple of weeks (took me months)
#4
Yeah, I am pretty tough on myself when it doesn't work out the way I want to, and I demotivate myself that way. I should learn not to do that. So barre chords it is. Thank you!
#5
Also, it helps to break things down into stages, where one aspect of what you've got to learn is introduced in each stage. For example, you could do this:
1) Start with just A major played on all six strings at the 5th fret. Just strum that sucker. Do some muting by relaxing the fingers on your fretting hand. Try out different strumming patterns, and have fun with it. That will get you used to making the shape, and getting used to making the barre.
2) Add the G major with the same shape at the 3rd fret. Practice going back and forth between the A and the G. Keep a strum going and tap your foot, and try to change on a tap. If the change isn't quite clean yet, don't sweat it too much, just keep going. Now your practicing one more aspect - moving a chord from position to position.
3) Instead of A major try A minor. Do what you did in 2) except with the Am instead of the major - ie.going back and forth between A minor and G major. Now you've introduced one more aspect: changing shapes as well as positions.
4) Then maybe you could try E minor (played at the 7th fret, with just the highest 5 strings - the 5 closest to the ground) with the A minor from 3). Now you're changing shapes, positions, and which strings you are hitting.

And so on... Introducing things one step at a time helps you build things up gradually without it ever being overwhelming.

Good luck! And can the perfectionism for now and just have fun with it! There will be plenty of time for being a perfectionist later on when you've got more practice under your belt.
#6
Thank you, I'll definitely try it If anybody has more tips, you're more than welcome to enlighten me