#1
Whats up guys.

So I wanted to ask you an opinion,

I play well the guitar, and every song on the setlist of every concert my band has, i always play each one 98% or up. but the thing is whenever I'm on stage I start to like get anxiety for the parts that if I fail, everyone will notice, I play in a Heavy metal band, and sometimes we have to play clean, and that's when i get nervous. If I was 100% relaxed, I wouldn't fail, but the fact that people are looking a watching makes me fail a lot in cleans.

what can I do to overcome this?

Any tips from someone who had this condition?
#2
I think that most of the people don't even realize if you fail, and those who do are musicians and know they've been through it as well....

Also, as long as people are having fun, they don't care much about instrumental mistakes (I mean, like if you play one wrong note in the arpeggio) as long as you don't stop playing or make something like that.
Also, if you keep playing as if nothing happened, they probably won't even realize you did something wrong.

It's not meant to be an excuse to not work on those parts that give you problems (I think everyone should work to play everything as it is supposed to be), but I mean, there's no need to get stage fright for this.

Just my opinion based on my very little experience!
#3
Quote by Michele_R
I think that most of the people don't even realize if you fail, and those who do are musicians and know they've been through it as well....

Also, as long as people are having fun, they don't care much about instrumental mistakes (I mean, like if you play one wrong note in the arpeggio) as long as you don't stop playing or make something like that.
Also, if you keep playing as if nothing happened, they probably won't even realize you did something wrong.


That's a good way to look at it, but yeah i'll just keep training and training till i'm 100/100.. thanks man
#4
Its easy to let this get out of hand. Spend a bit of time thinking about the worst that could happen.. your fingers land wrong or tangle inethe strings and it goes 'gronk!' like in rockband. Now, how fast can you recover? Can you missa note or beat and get back into it after a secord or two? If so, who is going to notice or care? It's over as quickly as you get back into it.

Have you ever seen a musician make a mistake? Did you ever care?

The more you really look at it, and ttink about your reactions to others mistakes, the less and less important it gets. I'm much more worried about vomiting (didn't hurt biebers career any) or falling off the stage (good #or a few chuckles on youtube).
Last edited by innovine at Jan 26, 2014,
#5
My acting class teacher. Which was the same person that taught me speech.
Basically I had to get up in front of the class room.

She said to just look over people's head or see them as naked.
In her own way she was saying to think people as ******ed.lol

Then again I also had to play clean when I was in my HS jazz band.
So I couldn't cover a lot of my mistakes.
Plus being on stage at an early age. You just get used to it after a while.
After a while it's just a matter of getting the tones you want.
It was just all in my head because I didn't have enough sustain.
I got too caught up in being too clean. I simply needed to add more drive to
my guitar. I was still young and didn't have a delay. I compensate with
reverb as much I can...probably too much.

Do you listen to Eric Johnson? He has a clean tone...but there's drive to his
tone. Maybe try messing with a delay to get more sustain. Not too much delay,
enough to make it feel comfortable or the strings still feel they're soft.
Last edited by smc818 at Jan 26, 2014,
#6
I keep remembering the guy (was it a forum member here) who was playing in his school band and when his turn came to do his four bar solo, he stood up to play and because he was standing on the guitar cable it popped out and he missed the whole thing.
This makes me happy.
#7
Quote by innovine
I keep remembering the guy (was it a forum member here) who was playing in his school band and when his turn came to do his four bar solo, he stood up to play and because he was standing on the guitar cable it popped out and he missed the whole thing.
This makes me happy.


AHAH xD
#8
Quote by innovine
Its easy to let this get out of hand. Spend a bit of time thinking about the worst that could happen.. your fingers land wrong or tangle inethe strings and it goes 'gronk!' like in rockband. Now, how fast can you recover? Can you missa note or beat and get back into it after a secord or two? If so, who is going to notice or care? It's over as quickly as you get back into it.

Have you ever seen a musician make a mistake? Did you ever care?

The more you really look at it, and ttink about your reactions to others mistakes, the less and less important it gets. I'm much more worried about vomiting (didn't hurt biebers career any) or falling off the stage (good #or a few chuckles on youtube).



Yeah, basically the trick is not thinking too much about failing, just going with it.. I'll have to get used to that, since I'm a perfectionist, lol but thats good advice..
#9
As already stated, the fact is, most non-musicians won't recognize that you've hit the wrong note. As long as the entire solo or riff isn't flubbed, you'll be fine - just keep practicing. I play lead/solo in a trio and I've made the occasional mistake in front of the audience. Good advice given earlier - keep playing and don't let your body language indicate that you've made a mistake. What else? Repeat the same mistake in the next verse or chorus! Seriously! I've done that before and it works. Your band mates may catch the flub and intentional repeat, but the audience will never know it. And if that section of the song is really causing you issues, then practice the snot out of it. Practice it until you can play it with your eyes closed.

And don't be so nervous up there! The audience isn't there to watch you make a mistake, they're there to enjoy the fruits of your practice and lessons.
#10
I don't feel any anxiety when I can play the songs without making any mistakes, even when i would play the harder parts like 20 times in a row. If you know you mastered the songs it will only be fun to play.
#11
I can't help but smile whenever myself or someone I'm playing with makes a mistake onstage. I kind of learned to laugh at mistakes, and make a note to work out the kinks for next time. But as far as getting over actually feeling stage fright, just play in front of people more, you'll feel more confidence every time.
Israel is a terrorist state.
#12
You just have to be so in the moment of that song, and that expression of playing that song to an audience that even you don't notice the mistakes.
Caution:
This post contains my opinion and/or inaccurate information


Quote by vayne92
I'm genuinely beginning to think you're the best troll of all time


"Emocore is like, when you cry when you break a guitar string"
- Thurston Moore
#13
The easiest way to do it is:
1) Learn your songs by heart. You should be able to play them perfect, even if you're blitzed out of your mind on acid and cocaine at the same time. (This doesn't mean you'll never make mistakes, just that you'll be less likely to do so.)
2) Keep performing. As you perform more, it becomes more familiar to you and the fear lessens.
#14
Quote by innovine
I'm much more worried about vomiting (didn't hurt biebers career any)

I didn't know this. Potentially the best thing I've heard since Fergie pissed her pants. Off to youtube I go.
#15
It's quite funny when one of you makes a small mistake, plus 99% of the time the crowd doesn't really notice.
#16
If you screw up on the cleans, practice them more.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#17
If you have mastered the stuff then it really is a mental problem. Sometimes people create a stage persona, If you are like me and quite anxious and lack a little confidence then this can work. Imagine being someone who is better than everyone, that they should be privileged to be watching you play, that you are the master and if you do make a mistake it is hilarious to you and the people around you or that it was done as you are bored of perfection. You kind of have to believe it too, like method acting… May work
#18
Quote by innovine
I keep remembering the guy (was it a forum member here) who was playing in his school band and when his turn came to do his four bar solo, he stood up to play and because he was standing on the guitar cable it popped out and he missed the whole thing.
This makes me happy.


When I played my high school talent show for my bands 'first gig' I only had like an 8 ft cable and the stage was huge. I was moving around and managed to unplug the cable 3 times in front of like 150 people. I was hammered though so I didn't really care.
#19
This is what are motto is in my band..."Its not the failing that counts, its how we clean up the mess".....takes the edge off and seeing the band as a whole really helps when performing live.....if someone f#cks up everyone tries to cover up and make the best of the situation.....and then laugh about it afterwards!

Another good thing to do is videotape your live performance....we did this in the beginning and when watching afterwards its amazing how even the parts you really think you blundered on are hardly even noticeable! Remember the audience will be more satisfied with the lead guitarist that smiles and jumps around stage like a madman and plays 86% correct rather than the ball of sweaty nerves playing 98%.....
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#20
Most people never notice unless you either stop playing or look guilty. I think everyone has a little stage fright under the right conditions especially when you first start to play live gigs. It’s natural and you’ll get over it as you gain time and experience playing. I think what causes our stage fright is the thought of something happening that we don’t anticipate and that doesn’t have to be just your mistake, it may be someone else’s mistake. Your fellow musicians may be the one’s making mistakes. Will you follow, lead or stop playing. You need the confidence of knowing that whatever curve you are thrown on stage you can handle it. It’s good to practice stuff you already know so you learn it inside and out but I also suggest that you practice with stuff you don’t normally play or even like. For example if you play metal, practice playing along to blues tracks or easy listening jazz tracks (YouTube is a great source for backing tracks.). If you play blues all the time, play some metal or reggae or anything you don’t normally play. Take yourself out of the style you do most and just try jamming through other stuff. You’ll get to be a better player all round and gain more confidence in your ability which will translate to confidence on stage.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 30, 2014,