#1
Howdy, so for a while now (like 10 years), I've been wanting to get a Gibson Les Paul, and I figured that I would get a Gibson LP Studio, but then I noticed the Epiphone LP Standard Plus Pro, and from what I've seen so far, it really has no downsides other than it's Asian-made, it sounds very similar, it looks great, and the materials aren't that different, but still, I'm a bit sceptical.
Can anyone who might have a Gibson LP (studio, preferably) and/or a Epiphone LP Standard say how different they are, or at least how does it Epiphone perform, does it stay in tune, does it really sound as good as a Gibson? Thanks in advance for the help!
#2
I had a studio for 6 years, it was a solid guitar and it played very nice. Epiphone guitars can be really nice also. I have a G-400 and it is a great guitar and it cost $299 new. But no matter how nice the Epi Is to me, I still want the real deal
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
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#3
You either get a Gibson, or regret not getting one.
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#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
You either get a Gibson, or regret not getting one.



Boom.
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#6
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
You either get a Gibson, or regret not getting one.


I have personally regretted buying my studio and not a high-end Epiphone many times. The greatness of Gibson guitars is mostly marketing hype, and you can do just as well for a lot less money by buying something else.
#7
Quote by jpnyc
The greatness of Gibson guitars is mostly marketing hype, and you can do just as well for a lot less money by buying something else.


I disagree. I've got 3 Les Pauls, 2 Epiphones and a Gibson Trad Pro. All three guitars are great axes... But in my opinion Comparing an Epi, even a high end one, is like comparing a Ford Focus to a Lincoln Town Car... Yea.. they'll both get you there, but one makes you enjoy the ride a little more. My Gibson plays better, sounds better and just feels better in my hands...

As Always.. JMHO
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#8
I also faced the same question, to go with the cheaper Epiphone or shell out more money for the Studio.

I went with the Studio.

Mainly because I know I would've regretted it later on, and would've hated the Epiphone logo and the different headstock.

It just isn't the same. Not atleast to me. No matter how identical they may sound.

My studio:

#9
Quote by jpnyc
I have personally regretted buying my studio and not a high-end Epiphone many times. The greatness of Gibson guitars is mostly marketing hype, and you can do just as well for a lot less money by buying something else.



Stop that.
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#10
My Gibson LP Studio has taught me a lot of things that my Epiphone LP Standard Plus Top didn't. Of course I had the Epiphone for shorter time and I wasn't much of a guitar player back then, although I still played it 3 hours a day. Back to the point, Gibson has taught me what I want out of a guitar and what I don't. I went away from Ibanez RG505, 24 frets and FR-style trem. Gibson taught me I don't really need either, I can do a lot of neat stuff. 22 fret guitars SOUND better to me, especially on the neck pup.
I've had a very pleasant time with my LP. I don't regret buying it, I never will. Great value for the money and plays like a real one. I could have gone for a Traditional at the time I bought mine. I didn't, cause this one didn't weigh as much and I have back problems. Still it sounds damn nice. If you like how it plays, how it sounds and how it feels, go for it. Those are the 3 reasons I went for it and as said, I have never regretted it to this day and even when I part with it, I won't regret it.

TL;DR Great guitar, buy it if you like it.
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#11
I'm in agreement with T00DEEPBLUE. You said yourself you've wanted a Gibson Les Paul for a decade. If you have a Gibson sized hole in your heart an Epiphone won't fill it. Even if it was unaccountably the greatest guitar ever.
#12
I've wanted a Gibson V ever since I was a 7 year old boy. When I finally made enough money to actually get one, as much as I liked the guitars I was trying, I just had to get a Gibson V when I had the cash, because I knew I would kick myself if I didn't.
Quote by jpnyc
I have personally regretted buying my studio and not a high-end Epiphone many times. The greatness of Gibson guitars is mostly marketing hype, and you can do just as well for a lot less money by buying something else.

Then you didn't use your common sense when it comes to buying Gibsons and that is to always try before you buy them. Epiphones are designed fundamentally to not be as good as Gibsons, so even if you come across a Gibson that doesn't play that great at the store, there is always the possibility that there will be a Gibson that plays perfectly and it'll be fundamentally superior to the equivalent Epiphone. Since there's no price for being patient, (unless you just want a Les Paul for instant gratification) I don't see what sense it makes to get an Epiphone when you can afford the real thing with a bit of searching and money saving.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 26, 2014,
#13
Epiphone Elitists: The Godwin's law of the Epi/Gibson squabble.

They were good guitars for a good price. They never sold well and their prices are inflated now because of internet hype. They were a great deal if you got one used 10 years ago.
#14
Thanks guys for all of your responses, though now I'm even more conflicted on which guitar do I want to get more. I'd probably will end up getting a Gibson LP studio, but the only problem is that I'm from a Ex-Soviet country called Lithuania, and a 1000Euro is whole ton, and I'm not too sure how badly will it empty out my pockets...
#15
If you've always wanted a Gibson, buying an Epiphone will not satisfy your desires.
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#16
Quote by LunaticVikingQu
Thanks guys for all of your responses, though now I'm even more conflicted on which guitar do I want to get more. I'd probably will end up getting a Gibson LP studio, but the only problem is that I'm from a Ex-Soviet country called Lithuania, and a 1000Euro is whole ton, and I'm not too sure how badly will it empty out my pockets...


Went through the same exact thing. My Studio was the first 'expensive' guitar I bought. Also a thousand euros, while my first guitars were 300€ at most.

Worth every cent.
#17
I was lucky. I worked in a music store when I first got interested in guitar (I was already a keyboard player), so my first half-dozen guitars were all Gibsons (still have all but one). Over the years I've gotten into other guitars, but I've always been a Gibson fan.

Asian-built guitars have long been considered second rate by Gibson purists...until the Japanese brands began to surpass Gibson's quality (Ibanez AR-300, Yamaha SG-2000 in the late '70s, early '80s). Gibson came close to going belly up and the LP was nearly discontinued yet again, but Slash and AFD saved both shortly after Henry J bought the company. Since then, Gibson has ridden the wave of Baby Boomer nostalgia hard. Gibson has been selling a lot of guitars at high prices, but their quality has been inconsistent of late, while first Korean guitars and now Chinese and Indonesian guitars began to produce very high quality guitars at prices that reflected the actual costs of the wood and components that went in them.

At this point, Gibson has great brand name recognition and is associated with expensive guitars and rock stars. Years ago they bought out long-time high-end rival Epiphone (at one point Epiphone was actually producing guitars that were better than Gibson's best) when bad management ruined it, and they've gloated ever since by making it their "cheap" guitar. Several times the Epiphone folks produced guitars that really rivaled their corporate owners -- once in Japan, again in Korea. Each time Gibson moved the plant and lowered the quality. Now produced largely in China and Indonesia, Epiphone's quality (at their high end) has crept back up.

Meanwhile, Gibson has realized that it has little or NO brand loyalty at the entry level; it's spent so much time with Boomer money (and they're retiring) that it's ignored the newbs. So it's begun to cheapen up its guitars as much as it can, and the result is a guitar like the LPJ, which would be laughed at by most if there weren't a Gibson logo on it. In the under $1000 market and at comparative prices, Gibson is outclassed badly by Asian imports.

If you buy carefully, you can end up with a far better guitar than anything that Gibson makes, penny for penny. The only way you can really maximize your dollar on a Gibson in that range is to keep a wicked eye on the used market.
#18
^ that's why I'm a PRS guy, best production guitars money can buy.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#19
I've had an LP Studio for 10 years. Most of which it was my only electric guitar so it's been played to death. It's a wonderful guitar with great attention to detail. The neck isn't bound but you don't need it as the frets are filed very nicely at the edges with no sprouts whatsoever. Frets were very level when new (after 10 years of almost daily playing it needs a fret level). The 498t-490r combo is a good very versatile set and the new ones have coil taps taking it even further. Oh and it has sustain for days, haven't played another guitar that can match in that regard yet.

My only warning is if you get one don't put it in a rubber lined stand, it will eat through the nitro finish on a new guitar. (Yes I know this from experience).

I've never played an Epi but I've bought a couple Asian made guitars over the last couple years (not LP style though) and not been satisfied.
#20
I picked up a Gibson LP Studio Deluxe a few years back.... great guitar. Sounded and plays like you would expect a Gibson to do so. I always wanted one since I had a Bradley LP Custom (Matsumoku made copy from the 70s).

Then I picked up a used PRS CE22. This was the low end of the PRS USA made guitar lines a few years ago. The quality of PRS is spectacular. Since I got it, the Gibson has become a closet queen... literally. Even my MiM Tele gets more play time.

Does it mean my Gibby is crap? Hell no. It means my tastes have changed somewhat.

And if your going to look at Asian made, consider the PRS SE line. Great guitars, low cash needed.

Happy hunting.
--- Joe ---
77 Bradley LPC || 07 PRS CE22 || 11 PRS MC58 Artist || 95/02 Fender Strat || 99 Gibson LP DC Std Lite
06 Ovation Elite-T || 12 Martin GPCPA4
Boss GT100 || Peavey Stereo Chorus 400 || Peavey Bandit 75 || Roland JC77
#21
Do yourself a favor and play a LTD EC 1000....
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