#1
I've had a guitar for over a year but have actually started seriously learning to play only the last month or two. I use Rocksmith 2014 and a few books (rocksmith does not not cover music theory). I know every musician needs to know at least basic music theory but I don't know really where to go now. I started with scales and so far I have learned the C, G, A Major scales, the Pentatonic A minor scale, the blues scale and the natural minor scale. I know scales are essential but I'm just not sure how they are used in the structure of chords/music. I also know the basic open, bar/power chords. I love to listen and play metalcore/post-hardcore music like We Came As Romans, blessthefall, Bullet For My Valentine etc. What scales, techniques do I need to be fluent in to play that genre of music? Lol sorry if its a little confusing I'm just getting lost in all the stuff I need to learn. Thank you for any advice

(Just to make it clear to people that think im looking for a shortcut to be playing like a pro in a few days, im just asking what things I need to focus on to play that genre, not a "magical" solution.)
#2
The best way to be proficient at a style is to learn it, preferably by ear. Now, as you have only been playing for about a month or two learning by ear can be extremely difficult. It is probably the steepest learning curve you'll face in music but if you start early it will benefit you very much. Many players wait several years and rely on tablature, which in many cases have errors in them and it doesn't train your ear. So i would suggest you start with learning simple melodies you know by ear, such as happy birthday and maybe some christmas songs, something to get you going.

Now that i've preached ear training i am going to answer your original question. As said, learning the material you wish to play is probably the best idea, although i would never recommend a player to jump that fast into metal and such cause i firmly believe that a good grasp of your chords is necessary firstly.

But if you have to in order to stay motivated, search for the highest rated tabs of Bullet For my Valentine here on UG, cause they are the simplest band of those you mentioned. And then look at their easiest songs. Just remember to start at a tempo where you can actually play the stuff, even if it's one note a minute. Break the song into parts and practice each part separately. Make sure you are as relaxed as possible, that you are playing the stuff properly (Even if you play slow you have to play 100% right, don't miss any notes and aim for consistency) and cleanly (Meaning, if you are using distortion make sure you are muting the other strings properly so only the ones you mean to play ring out).

I hope that was helpful to you.
Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
Oh no i'm not trying to rush anything, I know learning an instrument just like many other things take years to get proficient at. I know how to read tab and most of the time you have to listen to the song to learn the strumming pattern, but do you have any further advice on ear training? I have noticed over the few years I have gotten into metalcore I have gotten better at pointing out the rhythms and beats of each instrument. At first It just sounded like a bunch of noise with singing but then as it started to grow on me I could separate the rhythm guitar from the lead, and the sometimes bass (kind of hard to hear that at times). I can play simple songs like "Now"by Paramore (Only three chords and single notes) and Blitzkrieg Bop by the Ramones (Only 4 chords). I learned those from rocksmith and they seem obvious now when I listen to them. But I'm confused as how people learn to identify the chords used in a song just by listening to it.
#4
Well at a start i think nursery rhymes and such are good. When you start ear training you want to do it with something you are very familiar with, stuff you've heard since you were a child preferably.

Then you can move on to well known pop/rock songs, you don't necessarily have to like them but it helps if you do. Whenever i sit turn on the radio there are often songs that are played several times a day, for example nowadays songs like "What does the fox say?", "Thrift Shop" etc. I don't listen to that stuff on my free time but since i've heard it it's stuck in my head and you might aswell use that to your advantage and try to learn it by ear.

Then you can get a program to slow down songs and loop sections you can learn some music that you enjoy. I recommend programs like Anytune, Amazing Slow Downer and Transcribe. They allow you to loop section, slow the tempo down and change the pitch of songs (so if a song is played in a down tuned tuning you can "tune" the song up to your guitar).

Other than that i recommend just doing it a lot. As said, it's a very steep learning curve, but it is also one of those things you will notice most that you are getting better at and it affects your playing as a whole.

Also, sing everything you play is a good advice. You want to make the connection between the sound you hear with your ears and where you place your fingers on the fretboard as strong as possible. And singing the lines you play will help immensely with this.

Hope that was helpful to you.
Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#6
If you want to learn to play metal then your best bet is to play metal..
You'll suck at it sure, but we all suck when we start.