#1
Played for 6 years as mainly a rhythm player and am gifted in that sort,mainly technical stuff.
But, I am not very good at lead,and am trying to improve but could use some help in where I should start off with maybe an exercise or something?Mainly I would like to get better at legato,and be able to shred like some of the people I listen to
I guess I'm not very big in theory as well,I Somewhat understand modes,Learning the 5 major scale shaped over again.
Basically I want to continue to grow.I really have become somewhat frustrated as of late.
Any help would very much be appreciated.
Guitars:
Esp Ec-1000 VB with Emg 81/60
Esp ec-1000 Snow White with SD Jb/Jazz
Esp ltd f-50
Amp:
Randall rd-20h
Randall rd112-v30
Pedals:
Digitech rp-1000
#2
Haha u alright

There's not really and special technique
The best thing to do is get a metronome and set it to a comfterble speed that you can play a short lead trill within 4 beats and then when your good with that speed make it faster

The key is to be clean no noise but the notes your hitting
#3
Try learning a song that is completely out of your comfort zone in terms of style: if you love metal, learn a jazz song, for example. The variety can help break this kind of rut, and having to play a different way can make the parts and techniques you are used to trying seem easier.
Last edited by Human371 at Jan 27, 2014,
#5
Quote by tybacca60
Played for 6 years as mainly a rhythm player and am gifted in that sort,mainly technical stuff.
But, I am not very good at lead,and am trying to improve but could use some help in where I should start off with maybe an exercise or something?Mainly I would like to get better at legato,and be able to shred like some of the people I listen to
I guess I'm not very big in theory as well,I Somewhat understand modes,Learning the 5 major scale shaped over again.
Basically I want to continue to grow.I really have become somewhat frustrated as of late.
Any help would very much be appreciated.


This:

Quote by My Last Words
What kind of leads do you want to play? Start from there..


is the most important question anyone has asked you so far.

You say you want to get better at legato... why? It's all very well and good to have this kind of aim but legato, and indeed all technique, is a means to an end... so what is your end?

If you have an actual aim, then you can start working towards it but if you don't have any idea where you want to end up how will you know which direction to go?

Also: you don't understand modes. If you're learning basic major scales as shapes then there's no way in hell you understand modes. What's more, you don't need to either. I can say that with a lot of confidence, no matter what your aim is.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
Quote by My Last Words
What kind of leads do you want to play? Start from there..

It's kind of an bad example,but I'd love just to sit down and shred somewhat like rob chappers(best example that everyone knows).To be able to pull a awesome lick out of nowhere.Leads that go from blues to rock and metal.

I guess right now my problem is that I'm not building speed.I have been working on a legato exercise on the high e that goes somewhat like 7-9-10 and trying to build speed but I'm not seeing any results after a week or so.
Guitars:
Esp Ec-1000 VB with Emg 81/60
Esp ec-1000 Snow White with SD Jb/Jazz
Esp ltd f-50
Amp:
Randall rd-20h
Randall rd112-v30
Pedals:
Digitech rp-1000
#7
Quote by tybacca60
I guess right now my problem is that I'm not building speed.I have been working on a legato exercise on the high e that goes somewhat like 7-9-10 and trying to build speed but I'm not seeing any results after a week or so.

Don't worry about speed. Worry about having clean and relaxed technique. Speed will come in time.

Also, ignore exercises. The best exercise is a challenging passage from a song you want to learn. Contextualize the techniques you want to practice. It'll give you motivation and much more visible results.
#8
1 Learn a six string pentatonic scale
2 Learn a six string major scale
3 Learn a six string minor scale

Stay away from the nut to start.

If the song sounds bluesy then use the notes in 1
If the song sounds happy then use the notes in 2
If the songs sounds sad then use the notes in

Find a few patterns which sound nice ... Go from there.
#9
Well, if you want to look over the evolution of my thinking in this thread, it may be useful:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1631923

I went from trying to get a better understanding of learning partial chords throughout the neck, to changing the way I visualize the whole fretboard. My conclusion per my last post in that thread is that learning boxed / vertical scale shapes is a bad way to progress to feeling comfortable moving around the fretboard playing lead or solos. I decided it is much faster and more beneficial to look at the major scale notes/patterns as a series of square, four-note "islands" that each have 2-note "wings" two frets away on either side. And they repeat, moving two strings up/down every two frets. Well, it would if not for the unusual interval between G and B, which requires you to adjust your thinking one fret where this pattern crosses from G to B, or vice versa. I think if you make a map yourself of the fretboard with these islands and side-wings, and then jam around the fretboard with that in mind, you may find that you become more comfortable finding all the notes in a key/scale up and down the fretboard and moving both horizontally and vertically.

I mean, I think you could throw in playing some of the traditional boxes, too, as another approach and see how that feels (CAGED boxes or the minor pentatonic boxes, or major scale boxes) which all are geared to minimizing horizontal movement. However, I think those ultimately become blinders and limit your seeing the larger simplicity of the fretboard layout.

I also recommend you imagine a guitar with, like, 20 strings on it, and imagine all the strings are tuned 5 semitones apart (like all strings on regular guitar except G to B) and then you fill out the major scale notes and color them in on THAT diagram. You'll get a really good picture of just how simple the pattern would be BUT FOR that G to B variation. But knowing what the pattern would look like without that variation, you can then focus on seeing that simple pattern, and just sliding that pattern down one fret where go from G to B, and I think it's the easiest way to wrap your head around the fretboard pattern.

Ken
Bernie Sanders for President!