#1
For the six years that ive been playing guitar, getting tones that i really like has always been a big challenge for me; and to be honest, im not terribly picky about tone.. Just ive always felt mine has fallen short.

Anyways, i made a key revelation most recently that has opened my eyes and made me realize what it is im missing in my tone. I THINK it is what people describe as your tone being "articulate". Im hoping thats the correct term. The best way I can describe it is if you close your eyes and then you pluck the low e-string for example, the tone actually sounds and feels like a fat string oscillating and you can picture it in your head. I would describe the tone being not articulate if you turned your bass knob way up, and it no longer sounds like a string; just a big bassy noise without the definition of a string vibrating. Im mostly refering to clean to low gain tone; not so much heavy dist. (And no, i dont crank the bass way up. Its usually less than midnight)

Anyways- i bought a zoom g3x and despite it being a modeller multifx pedal (and an incredibly affordable one at that), it sounds absolutely amazing when i play it through headphones. And that string definition and articulation is there. I havent yet played it through speakers.

But I notice that my tube heads with my cab just dont have that articulate quality. Ive used Bugera, Fender, Egnater, and Engl through a Carvin Legacy 4x12 (v30s). Could this be a result of the cabinet, the room that i play in (a small laundry room), volume (will articulation increase with volume?) or any other factors? If i can just capture that definition, i know i will be 100x more satisfied with my tone.

Sorry for the long winded description. Thanks and best!
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#2
Quote by Watterboy
Could this be a result of the cabinet, the room that i play in (a small laundry room), volume (will articulation increase with volume?) or any other factors? If i can just capture that definition, i know i will be 100x more satisfied with my tone.


yes, it could be all those reasons. amps sound pretty crappy in my apartment.

playing directly through a multi-effects (MFX) and into headphones is quite a bit different than playing through an amp and cab. you probably like the cabinet emulation of the g3x, using it with headphones limits the environmental effects and presents a quite optimal listening environment.

also your tastes may change over time. i used to like the sound of my mfx units, but eventually i got away from using them.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
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#4
Quote by gumbilicious
yes, it could be all those reasons. amps sound pretty crappy in my apartment.

playing directly through a multi-effects (MFX) and into headphones is quite a bit different than playing through an amp and cab. you probably like the cabinet emulation of the g3x, using it with headphones limits the environmental effects and presents a quite optimal listening environment.

also your tastes may change over time. i used to like the sound of my mfx units, but eventually i got away from using them.


Thank you man- appreciate the response. That makes a lot of sense. And yea- the multifx do sound really good in my opinion; but they are definitely missing something that my tube amps have, despite sounding much more defined through the phones out in any situation.
Quote by suckmahnuts
Watterboy, I love you.

Quote by davrossss
You are now my favourite person on UG.....You write cool shit.

Quote by wannabestoner69


#5
If you're looking for the best of both worlds, try sticking a mic on one of your tube amps, running it through an interface and into headphones. I do it all the time with my Mesa Mark IV, a Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 and an SM57 and sounds great.
#6
Your headphones are a full-range reproduction device, probably something on the order of 20Hz - 20Khz, give or take. Your guitar speaker cabinets are mostly 110Hz to maybe 4000Hz, far less hospitable to a modeler. This is why most folks are using their modelers through PA type speakers, or recording monitors or something similar. Notice that the new amp from Line 6 has a single 12" speaker in a closed-back ported cabinet (for greater/lower bass response) along with a pair of midrange drivers and a pair of tweeters. The closer you can come to full-range cabinets, the closer your sound will be to what you hear in your headphones.
#7
Quote by dspellman
Your guitar speaker cabinets are mostly 110Hz to maybe 4000Hz, far less hospitable to a modeler.


wouldn't the modeler model this response anyway? so how would that make it 'far less hospitable' for a modeler?
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#8
the answer has more to do with how your hearing works. don't remember the specifics but headphones don't react the same with your ears as an open environment. when recording I use headphones but the burned disc played on a stereo often sounds different than I remember through the headphones. have t keep that in mind when mixing.
#9
Quote by gumbilicious
wouldn't the modeler model this response anyway? so how would that make it 'far less hospitable' for a modeler?


Depends on what it's modeling, of course.

Most folks with modelers report their best results with full range flat response speakers. Running them through a guitar cabinet adds the guitar cabinet's characteristics to whatever's being modeled.

There's also this: a small laundry room is going to produce a lot of phase interaction issues that are going to produce less than optimal sound. We used to practice in an underground boiler room that was large enough, but that had so much reflected sound that it produced sonic mulch. We hung big old thick packing blankets from the beams and padded the floors with them until we got something closer to articulate sound.