#1
Hi,
I've been coming here for years, but finally decided to register.
I hope this is the right place to post this, if not I'm sorry and would like to ask the moderator to move it.

Due to the lovely weather we have here (where I live) I finally fell on the ice (almost broke my own neck) and the outcome of it is this:


This is the only photo I have at the moment. It broke asymmetrically at the tuning peg's axis and right were the screw holding it in place is.
Basically the question is fixable without replacing the entire headstock? Will gluing it with stuff like Titebond do the trick?

Thanks for any help in advance.
Last edited by tsc86 at Jan 28, 2014,
#5
Quote by -MintSauce-
I had money on this being a Gibson or Epiphone.


Yeah, probably should have added "not a Gibson/Epiphone" to the title.

Quote by von Layzonfon
That is completely fixable with Titebond, yes.


How would you go about doing that so it's done the right way? (Of course, besides gluing and tight clamping.) Do you think I should glue it together and plug the tuning peg hole with hard maple and then drill a new one? Or maybe I should drill some holes to the side of the headstock and fill them with hard maple plugs to strengthen it?
Or maybe just glue it together, clamp it, wait for the glue to set and it's good to go?

I'm asking 'cause I use some pretty thick strings and I would like to fix it once and not worry about it breaking again just because of string tension.
#6
The glue alone should be ample, as long as you do go for Titebond I. Once it's set it'll be stronger than the wood itself. Besides, you have a locking nut which will take most of the strain once you're tuned up.

And get a hard case.
#7
Quote by von Layzonfon
And get a hard case.


It's kind of funny actually... I do own a hard for it and it was the first time I ever took it out of the house in a gig bag. Just because I wanted to be a nice guy and save some space in the car... We had to take a smaller car to a gig as the usual one was in the shop and we had to hold some of the gear on our laps.

Quote by von Layzonfon
The glue alone should be ample, as long as you do go for Titebond I. Once it's set it'll be stronger than the wood itself. Besides, you have a locking nut which will take most of the strain once you're tuned up.


Thanks for your help, von Layzonfon.
By the way, Titebond I is Titebond Original, right?
#9
Quote by von Layzonfon
Yes. I've seen people advise against Titebond II & III for guitar applications for reasons which currently escape me.


Thanks again for the info.
According to their interweb the only difference between Titebond Original and II & III is that the later to is designed to be used for outdoor furniture and woodwork and is waterproof. So maybe it has some adverse or corrosive effect to stuff like finish, binding and other non-wooden element of guitars...
Anyways thanks again for your help
#11
It looks like Titebond II is just fancy PVA. Titebond III is apparently stronger, but it's more viscous and has a higher solid content - maybe Titebond Original penetrates the wood better and gives a cleaner join, leaving less residue. It also dries fairly clear.
#12
I think the Titebond II and III have a higher creep factor. Also, if it was not a clean break and you are missing large splinter, I would consider using an epoxy due it its better gap filling properties.
#13
Quote by Rusty_Chisel
I think the Titebond II and III have a higher creep factor. Also, if it was not a clean break and you are missing large splinter, I would consider using an epoxy due it its better gap filling properties.


To me it looks like it is just being pried open, not missing a chunk. But epoxy is also an alternative, and dries quicker.