#1
Will practicing lead runs on acoustic help you become better on electric? is it kind of like using a practice donut on a baseball bat? Or will it be a detriment because of the varied tension, action, etc? Just something I've always been curious about and you guys are the geniuses on all things guitar. Thanks
#2
The extra tension does actually make playing lead on an acoustic a very good exercise, and if you can play it well on acoustic, it should be even easier on electric. The only downside is that you don't really get practice with palm muting/playing clean with distortion, so I'd recommend practicing on both instruments for the best results.
#3
^ Yeah.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#4
The clarity of the notes could also be a huge help. This is a good idea.
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#5
I recommend it. I often practice on my acoustic and the if it's something that is supposed to be played with distortion i start on the acoustic and then move onto the electric.

Getting the notes to pop out properly is much harder on an acoustic than on a electric guitar, and you can often get some very good benefits from the acoustic aswell. After practicing gypsy jazz on acoustic my electric playing was better than ever, atleast in picking and articulations.
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#6
the other thing is you can practise on the electric unplugged. that way you can do the things which you'd struggle with on acoustic and get the "proper" response of the electric without having the bit associated with electric guitar which can con you into thinking you're better than you are (compression etc.).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
Quote by Dave_Mc
the other thing is you can practise on the electric unplugged. that way you can do the things which you'd struggle with on acoustic and get the "proper" response of the electric without having the bit associated with electric guitar which can con you into thinking you're better than you are (compression etc.).


I went for quite a stretch playing mostly unplugged on an electric. It was when my kids were real young, and I had to be careful not to wake them up when I played in the evenings (which was 99% of my practice time).

I'd say there are some pros and cons. You have to work harder to get the notes to flow, and you general pick a bit harder, and pay more attention to dynamics. All good things. The downside is that it's easier to not notice muting related problems. When I went back to playing mostly plugged in, I found that I was either muting too much or not enough. It took about a month to get my muting caught up with the rest of my playing. Also, you develop a tendency to play hammer ons with more force than necessary.

I think the perfect scenario is to play plugged in, but just with a nice moderate crunch from the amp. No distortion pedal. Like playing unplugged, you have to really have your articulation down to get things to flow, but you do notice muting problems. That, and it's a lot more fun.
#8
Quote by se012101
The downside is that it's easier to not notice muting related problems.


Absolutely. I have periods of time where I mainly play unplugged and never get round to plugging into an amp (say I'm short of time or tired and can't be bothered turning on the amps, and I figure 10 mins here or there unplugged is better than nothing). When I finally do get round to plugging in, for the first few minutes of playing my muting is all over the place

I think the best thing is really practising both plugged in and not, because as you said there are pros and cons with each- each will help a lot as long as you don't ignore the other. And if you have an acoustic practising on it will help in other ways, too (but again, there are cons with it as well).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
As mentioned, it's physically more demanding playing acoustic so switching to electric will seem easier when you make the change. But why not just go straight to electric?

The thicker strings of an acoustic will make bending strings very tough so if you can't go electric straight away I suggest getting lighter gauge strings to make this easier.
#10
I don't think it would be beneficial. It's sort of the equivalent of practicing to drive a sports car around a racing track in a honda civic.
#11
You possibly could make that argument, too. I'm never much a fan when people say, "Want to do A better? Then you should do B!" because even if B helps, it's debatable if it will help as much as just doing A more.

That being said sometimes there are things which give you a different perspective or help in slightly different ways etc. so
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#12
Quote by Dave_Mc
.

That being said sometimes there are things which give you a different perspective or help in slightly different ways etc. so


This is why i recommend to practice with an acoustic sometimes. In my particular case i've had problems that were solved by practicing them on acoustic and then moving back to electric with them afterwards.

An example of this is that a while back i had the problem that i could pick stuff well, but accenting was a problem. I was after that snappier sound that you would hear from gypsy guys like Jimmy Rosenberg or Bireli Lagrene, and since they play gypsy on acoustic guitars i thought i'd give that a try. Moving back to electric everything became much smoother and easier to execute.

Electric and acoustic guitars have advantages and disadvantages for learning different things. Acoustic guitars is great for hearing how accurate your playing is, in my opinion it is much harder to play a line distinctly on acoustic than on electric. On the other hand, you need electric to practice proper muting.


Sometimes silly stuff helps, sometimes it doesn't.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Last edited by Sickz at Feb 1, 2014,
#13
Learning barre on acoustic a couple years ago made barring on electric a complete non-issue.
#14
Quote by Sickz
This is why i recommend to practice with an acoustic sometimes. In my particular case i've had problems that were solved by practicing them on acoustic and then moving back to electric with them afterwards.

An example of this is that a while back i had the problem that i could pick stuff well, but accenting was a problem. I was after that snappier sound that you would hear from gypsy guys like Jimmy Rosenberg or Bireli Lagrene, and since they play gypsy on acoustic guitars i thought i'd give that a try. Moving back to electric everything became much smoother and easier to execute.

Electric and acoustic guitars have advantages and disadvantages for learning different things. Acoustic guitars is great for hearing how accurate your playing is, in my opinion it is much harder to play a line distinctly on acoustic than on electric. On the other hand, you need electric to practice proper muting.


Sometimes silly stuff helps, sometimes it doesn't.


Yeah, exactly. I think your last sentence hit the nail on the head- it just depends (and it may well depend on the individual, too, what works for me might not work for you etc. etc.). Try it and see if it helps, basically.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?