#1
I've been playing now for about 2 months. I've been pretty avid on it, around 2-3 hours a day, its actually starting to annoy my fiancé lol. Rhythm is my biggest culprit and it continues to elude me. The foot tapping just isn't clicking like everything else has. I actually took a break from the guitar for a week or so and practiced pure rhythm with a metronome, but anytime I pick up the guitar, I can never quite stay on beat.

Its the only thing I struggle with, everything else I'm great on.. Music theory, chord changes, guitar theory, finger strength, even getting down bar chords.. Staying on beat is my issue..

Any helpful links or tips on rhythm guitar?
#2
Practice.

That's seriously all there is to it. You've been playing for 2 months, man. It's not all going to come to you in that short amount of time.
ayy lmao
#3
Well, I'm an almost exclusively pure rhythm guitarist. I rarely stray away from anything outside of that.

First let me ask what kind of music are you play?

The thing about rhythm guitar and guitar in general is that getting down that right hand technique is really important. Whether you're like me playing in a prog band, so you're trying to deal with a ton of different weird chord shapes, or you are playing straight metal. The right hand is key to guitar. Know how to play rhythms on the right hand and you'll start to do better. I also tend to tap rhythms on my legs a lot, and when I find one that I like, I will take out the guitar pick I always carry on my person, and strum or pick along to the rhythm.

The left hand will figure itself out, and one you get the patterns down, it's muscle memory. The right hand is where you specifically should focus your attention on.

Play along to song that you like and it'll help you improve as well.

Good luck man.
#4
Quote by tonello
Well, I'm an almost exclusively pure rhythm guitarist. I rarely stray away from anything outside of that.


This is basically me (except I'm newish to the guitar world, around 12 months or so) I just love playing the deep crunchy back tones of metal. It's all about practice, I'm no where near perfect myself but I have gotten a lot better. It will all come in time, the only real thing with guitar is that it takes patience. Good luck!
#5
Don't sweat it. At the early stages, so much of your mind has to go into the mechanics of it, that it hard to "feel" the timing. Kind of like dancing and giving a presentation about quantum physics at the same time! Just keep practicing, don't ignore the timing, keep trying but don't worry if isn't quite right, and as your overall skills come up it will get easier.
Good luck!
#6
Thanks guys, that's what I figured it was.. Im playing a Ibanez AEF30 acoustic, and I'm loving Jazz and Blues, thats why its bothering me so much with the rhythm lol.
#7
As Tonello said, the right hand is everything. Practice is critical. I tell everyone to get a metronome or a drum machine to practice to. I use FL Studio free version. I make a simple kick/snare beat and play to that every day. Practice it slowly to get the rhythm down, and then build up the speed.
#8
Quote by kyhoward1989
Thanks guys, that's what I figured it was.. Im playing a Ibanez AEF30 acoustic, and I'm loving Jazz and Blues, thats why its bothering me so much with the rhythm lol.


You just need to keep working on your right hand technique. Just find the rhythms that you like to play and keep working them. Then find new rhythms that you like.

Mastering guitar isn't about being able to understand every technique, it's about understanding a few techniques well.

The cool thing about jazz and blues to me is that rhythms get repeated over and over a lot, so that's easy. When I played in high school it always seemed that some instrument was using that same main rhythm or line.

Good luck with it.
#9
If I may give you my 5¢, here is what I have been doing since I decided to get better with rhythm.

1. Get a simple chord progression. Maybe a 12 bar blues, to start.

2. Take a metronome that always sound the same. I'd tell you to avoid drum machines or anything that tells you what beat is playing.

3. Start slow, 60-65 bpm or so.

4. Without playing, count 1, 2, 3, 4 and tapping your feet with the beat. After 4, you get back to 1 with a single strum on your chord. Keep counting and tapping your feet. Play each bar, only with one strum when you count 1 ad let the chord ring to the end of the bar. Practice until you feel comfortable. It won't take long.

5. Now you can add extra strum patterns to your playing. You can strum on 1 and 3, strum on every beat, etc. In the beginning, it may be a bit boring, but I'm sure this won't take long.

6. Soon enough you'll be able to strum between beats and get more creative. Don't be afraid to try.

7. When practicing, never (I said NEVER) leave the metronome. Getting used to tapping your feet, also helps.

I hope this helps!
#10
Some good advice here. It's essential to go REALLY slowly, probably slower than you might think is slow, in order to get your hands and foot-tapp coordinated. As the last poster said, take something very simple - maybe even just one chord or note and start with that. The more complicated something is the less you can focus exclusively on timing.
#11
Foottapping is in my opinion bad.


Just listen to yourself playing, hear the drums in your head.


Look at some bassists stuff.

Play along a metronome if everything else fails.