#1
I'm not talking about the new min-etune series from Gibson i mean the old robot series from 2008 I believe it was.

What ever happened to those guitars I never heard much about them did they wind up having a lot of problems or something
#2
I think that the min-etune setup just made them obsolete. As far as I know there were no fundamental problems, but having all the electronics for the self-tuning system attached to the back of the headstock is a far more economical way of doing the same thing, so they have absolutely no reason to continue manufacturing the "robot" models.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#3
Well the robots also helped you get your intonation right too by telling how many turns to adjust the bridge I don't think the min-etune does that.
#4
I didn't think that was a big selling point for the robots, it didn't work very well and intonation isn't exactly rocket science in the first place.

The robots sold poorly, they were discontinued long before the Min-e-tune came out. A few reasons for the slow sales were probably the added complexity and cost (real or perceived), the distrust of a major technological addition from a brand generally associated with vintage/traditional designs, and a not uncommon opinion that the technology just wasn't all that necessary. People were hesitant to spend any extra money on tuning. I remember a lot of comments along the lines of "tuning isn't hard, I don't need a machine to do it for me."

I think in a phrase, the market wasn't ready for them. It didn't help that the technology wasn't perfect. We'll probably go through a few more generations before it's refined enough to gain widespread acceptance.
#5
+I would stay away from Robots. Gibson did not make the electronics, they were sourced from another Vendor. If anyhting goes wrong God help you cause Gibson won't be able to fix it.
Moving on.....
#6
While we're on the subject, how exactly does one pronounce Min-eTune? Is it mini tune?
#7
^I would call it a mini tune. Not sure if it's right, but it seems like the most logical way to pronounce it.

Quote by KenG
+I would stay away from Robots. Gibson did not make the electronics, they were sourced from another Vendor. If anyhting goes wrong God help you cause Gibson won't be able to fix it.

The electronics for the Robots were made by Tronical, the same company that makes the min-etune. The difference with the min-etune is it's not a special product designed specifically for a limited run of guitars - Tronical has a range of different versions available, designed to fit just about any guitar. I guess that's who you'd contact if something were to go wrong.

I think Gibson just has a special deal with Tronical to use min-etunes on some of their models as a standard feature, because I think the Robots and subsequent other failed "hi-tech" models like the dark fire, dusk tiger, firebird X etc which featured similar self-tuning electronics served as a tool to help Tronical to develop the technology.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#8
If I do remember correctly, there was a big problem with the robots. The system that ran the tuning program would break down a lot. I remember a friend who actually went through 2 of them before getting a partial refund and a Standard LP when Long and Mcquade couldn't fix his.
Quote by JAustinMunn

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#9
Quote by KenG
+I would stay away from Robots. Gibson did not make the electronics, they were sourced from another Vendor. If anyhting goes wrong God help you cause Gibson won't be able to fix it.


The problem was that Gibson wasn't willing to fix it. They were so guarded with the Robot tuners (they'd secured an exclusive on them from Tronical) that they required you to send the entire guitar back to them to get it fixed; wouldn't send parts to repair shops, etc.

Beyond that, they changed versions so fast that they didn't STOCK parts for a while. Tronical wasn't the problem, Gibson was.

The current non-exclusive arrangement allows Tronical to sell the TronicaTune (same as the MinETune) to anyone who has $350 and a guitar that fits. Back before Gibson, when they introduced the PowerTune (the original name for the Robot design), they had other versions including an inline version for Fenders. That came off the table when Gibson came along, but now Tronical is able to sell versions for Fenders and other guitars that need inline tuners as well.
#10
Quote by utmbarto
If I do remember correctly, there was a big problem with the robots. The system that ran the tuning program would break down a lot. I remember a friend who actually went through 2 of them before getting a partial refund and a Standard LP when Long and Mcquade couldn't fix his.


The tuners broke.

One thing that most buyers don't pay attention to regarding these tuners is that if you attempt to use the alternate tunings, you get some strings that are so tight they're cheese slicers and some that are floppy. Worse, however, if you have too light a gauge for certain tunings, the strings will break, and if the strings are too heavy the tuners will break. You can also break the tuners in certain situations by maunally turning the tuning keys while the system is on.

The technology isn't new.

The idea of using motors to self tune dates back to at least 20 years ago when Gibson tried to use the TransPerformance bridge in some LPs. They even had Jimmy Page endorsing it (he famously did one song where he struck a chord and then had the gizmo change tuning while he kept holding the chord). The same problems existed then as now, except that the motors pulled from bridge end, and the whole contraption required a huge rout out of the back *and* the sides of the LP.

In those days the bridge hardware itself was $3500 (in 1994) and the installation was expensive as well. At least the current price is a tenth of that.
#11
Quote by Roc8995
We'll probably go through a few more generations before it's refined enough to gain widespread acceptance.


It's still bulky and a bit heavy; and it needs safeguards and lockouts to prevent you from using it absent-mindedly. I think it might be fun to use it to tune your Floyd-equipped guitar after a string change, but you'd definitely want to lock it out after you locked the nut <G> *sPrOiNg*
#12
Quote by dspellman
The tuners broke.

One thing that most buyers don't pay attention to regarding these tuners is that if you attempt to use the alternate tunings, you get some strings that are so tight they're cheese slicers and some that are floppy. Worse, however, if you have too light a gauge for certain tunings, the strings will break, and if the strings are too heavy the tuners will break. You can also break the tuners in certain situations by maunally turning the tuning keys while the system is on.


Yea that sounds familiar. I don't think he would tune down that far though. He usually plays in half a step and then maybe a drop C# from there.

I do like the min E tune a lot more as far as a design. Sure you're paying a little more for it up front but after trying it, it works a lot better and can be completely bypassed if you don't want to use it.
Quote by JAustinMunn

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Quote by jpnyc
I played this guitar once. It unleashed the ****ing fury and I got kicked out of Guitar Center.
#13
I remember GASSING bad for a "dark fire" with robot technology... not so much for the robot stuff but i thought they were gorgeous.
Quote by BlackVoid
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#14
Robot's were pretty cool design I always liked them; however almost all the guitar forms I post on I saw massive hate for them, people bitching about digital stuff in an electric guitar (same issue with the Firebird X) and I think this really hurt the sales for the guitar so it was just discontinued so it didn't become a financial burden for Gibson. As mentioned the Robot technology was made by the same company that now makes the mini tune system, which is essentially a stripped down robot guitar, I think Gibson opted this route as it isn't much of a price increase over a normal guitar. You can also buy the system stand alone and install it in non-Gibson guitars.
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#15
I find the idea of a robot tuner to be pretty cool, but isnt the true selling point of those things to be the fact that you can do many different types of tuning with one guitar, basically at the touch of a button? I saw what dspellman wrote about the different variables. I wonder if the technology has advanced enough to stop some or all of those things. Tension sensing would stop the string breakage or overtightening. I also suspect you would have to tell the robot what gauge strings you are using. It would be really cool if you could program different gauges for each peg as I understand not all musicians use all the same gauge strings or otherwise have a custom setup.