An amplification technology questionnaire to help my college project

#1
A questionnaire to discover how has guitar amplification evolved and been influenced through a fast advance of technology.


1.Do you play guitar with the use of amplification.


2.Briefly describe your feelings on tube or solid state amps, ideally on build quality and tone. Feel free to elaborate and use comparisons.


3.Please suggest a brand/brands of guitar amplification that you have been a supportive user of and elaborate on why and how it has been used. This may be the situation, or what is it about the characteristics of the amp ,sims or VST product that you like.


4.Do you prefer the use of digital amplification over traditional valve/solid state amps for instance, Amplitude, Vst amp rack (Cubase 7) Guitar rig or amp simulation units (Boss GT series) (Line 6 pod X3.)


If to the previous question you answer yes please answer the following question:
If no was your response please move on to question 6:


5. Why is this, can you comment further on it beneficial for you?


6.Would you prefer the use of digital/amp sims software for any particular situation (Home,live,recording.) If so which situations and why.


7.Would you say in your opinion that some forms of amplification become more useable due to the marketing and ease of access?


8.Can you explain your reasoning for the above answer.


Thank you!
Please post your responses with numbered answers.
#2
1. sometimes
2. no
3. no
4. maybe
5. no
6. maybe
7. I'm not saying anything, I'm typing this stuff.
8. no
My Soundcloud

My beginner rig:

Epiphone Goth G-400 SG
Line 6 Spider IV (Don't judge me, I was young and stupid)
Stagg SW203N
Yamaha APX500
#3
Because I am bored.

Quote by Kaydehillmusic
A questionnaire to discover how has guitar amplification evolved and been influenced through a fast advance of technology.


1.Yes. Have not even owned an acoustic in years.


2.Never played a tube amp myself actually but I know they are better. Though obviously require more maintenance and have to be taken care of better. But I have heard before that some professionals(mostly blues artists) prefer solid state.


3. Flameshield. Been playing on and off again since I was 15 and have only owned two amps(not counting my shit starter that came with my first guitar). A roland cube 60 and P.O.S spider. In my defense the only reason I got the spider was because I bought a used 7 on an impulse after not owning a guitar for three years and only had $100 to spend on an amp or be ampless until I found a job(this was when I moved out of state). GC sucks and didn't even carry roland products.


4.Have never used them but when I get my tax return I am buying a pod hd500x or a used pod pro. Most of the artists I listen to went digital so I know I'll like them. I would love to be able to own an engl and custom cab but I don't have 5k to just waste on a new setup. And I've been living in apartments for the last five years.


5/6. Again I live in an apartment so I can't play loud. I know I'll like the tones/effects I'll have all in one for under $1000. I'll be able to use headphones to play in the middle of the night and not have to sacrifice sound quality that much. And overall ease of use when it'll come to recording. I just won't ever need some huge tube amp anytime in the foreseeable future.


7/8. I don't get what marketing has to do with it but yes. Digital is just easier/more reliable all around. Even if you have some huge amp you love you could still get something like a kemper to get the same exact sound and save yourself a lot of hassle touring/playing live.

Last edited by Wormholes at Jan 29, 2014,
#5
You should use something like surveymonkey so you'd have your results sorted and stuff without having to run through pages and pages of stuff.

1. Mostly not.

2. Solid state amps are better quality amps under more or less every aspect.
When talking about guitar stuff though tube amps tend to be better in quality and to sound a lot better and to have more features and so on.

3. The only guitar amp I bought to use it myself was a Blackheart BH5 and I'm reeeally satisfied. The build quality's good, the sound's good, the price's amazing.
Aaaight I bought it because of the price, mostly, though for the price I have never been able to find a better product - all tube head, good sounding.

4. Depends on the application.
I prefer amp sims when I need to record or I want to get a particularly processed sound, say for djent, or to just play with funny fx chains.

5. Amp sims are a lot more convenient for that.
The quantity of fx I can got for $500 with my copy of logic is huge compared to the amps/dedicated processors I could have gotten with the same money.

6. Again, sims when I need particularly processed stuff.

7. Not at all.

8. I hate marketing in the sense in which is conceived today.
I spend a lot of time looking for guitar sounds and therefore, amplifiers for the most part.
The ease of access is important, but again people who like strange stuff put a lot of effort into accessing the stuff they want themselves.

Anyway you started talking about amplification and you ended up talking about amp sims.
Get your terminology right brother - you don't care about amplification, you care about guitar amps.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#6
Thanks for the contribution, good answers! i was looking to see peoples views on both sims and traditional amplification.
#7
1. Yes
2. I have a tube amp and I like how it sounds.
3. I use an Orange because I like how it sounds.
4. No, I prefer analog.

6. No
7. I don't see how ease of access to a product would increase the useability of the product itself, but I might be misunderstanding the question.
8. See above answer
You who build these altars now

To sacrifice these children
You must not do it anymore
#8
Quote by Kaydehillmusic
A questionnaire to discover how has guitar amplification evolved and been influenced through a fast advance of technology.


1.Do you play guitar with the use of amplification.

Yes, although I'll practice unplugged as well.

2.Briefly describe your feelings on tube or solid state amps, ideally on build quality and tone. Feel free to elaborate and use comparisons.

I prefer the tone and feel of tube amps. Modelling technology and hybrid amps have made some real strides in the past decade or so though.


3.Please suggest a brand/brands of guitar amplification that you have been a supportive user of and elaborate on why and how it has been used. This may be the situation, or what is it about the characteristics of the amp ,sims or VST product that you like.

I currently use a Jet City JCA 20 as my main amp. I like single channel amps, and the JCA is a no-frills rock machine that does what I need very well. It's been used live and in the studio.


4.Do you prefer the use of digital amplification over traditional valve/solid state amps for instance, Amplitude, Vst amp rack (Cubase 7) Guitar rig or amp simulation units (Boss GT series) (Line 6 pod X3.)

I don't have very much experience with amp sims, so I have no opinion on the matter.

I think there are some great modelling units out there, but there's also a decent amount of crappy ones as well. If you need a wide variety of tones and don't have the space, money, or ability to haul multiple amps around to gigs, then modelling units can be a great tool.

That being said, I think many modelling units sound best when ran through a tube power amp or into the power section of a tube head.


If to the previous question you answer yes please answer the following question:
If no was your response please move on to question 6:


6.Would you prefer the use of digital/amp sims software for any particular situation (Home,live,recording.) If so which situations and why.

The only time I'd likely chose a modeller/sim over a tube amp would be for recording demos at home. When it came to recording a proper album or playing live, I'd go tube.


7.Would you say in your opinion that some forms of amplification become more useable due to the marketing and ease of access?

Probably


Thank you!
Please post your responses with numbered answers.


Answers in bold
Quote by Zeppelin71
Umm. . .uh. . .your mom touched sjones' dick. YOUR MOM TOUCHED OUR GUITARISTS GENITALS IN A CAMPER AT A BIKER FESTIVAL! truth.
#9
1.Do you play guitar with the use of amplification.

I do! I generally play a lot more electric than acoustic.


2.Briefly describe your feelings on tube or solid state amps, ideally on build quality and tone. Feel free to elaborate and use comparisons.

For tone i always prefer Tube, it seems to feel and respond to playing better.
Though it's too load for home practice on it's own, so i have been using an Ipod app and headphones at home lately, with my amp left at the band practice location.

Also due to it's weight and relative fragility, i generally play though effect pedals and a digital amp modeller direct to the PA for live gigs. Being located in london, the only way to get to gigs is train, and i dont fancy taking my tube amp on the tube!



3.Please suggest a brand/brands of guitar amplification that you have been a supportive user of and elaborate on why and how it has been used. This may be the situation, or what is it about the characteristics of the amp ,sims or VST product that you like.

My main amp is a Cornell Romany, handwired 10W combo. perfect for small jamming and recording session, with power scaling to allow anything from relatively load cleans, to quiet but heavy blues overdrive.
Live i have been using a crappy little digitech RP80 to model amps, and in combination with my separate effects (delay, reverb and a tubescreamer) i can get a pretty useable tone. It's just more practical for me for portability. Plus i have a setting to use the foot controller for volume on a cleaner setting for when i switch to mandolin, so i can balance out the volume whilst playing (or cut it out completely when unplugging)


4.Do you prefer the use of digital amplification over traditional valve/solid state amps for instance, Amplitude, Vst amp rack (Cubase 7) Guitar rig or amp simulation units (Boss GT series) (Line 6 pod X3.)

I would prefer to use traditional valve amps, but generally use digital modelling live as mentions above.


If to the previous question you answer yes please answer the following question:
If no was your response please move on to question 6:


5. Why is this, can you comment further on it beneficial for you?

Lighter/ore portable, and wont break as easily. But i don't really need the whole range of vst's + modelling, all i use it for is a simple amp modeller.


6.Would you prefer the use of digital/amp sims software for any particular situation (Home,live,recording.) If so which situations and why.

Home - so i can practice as much as i want without being to "to shut the fVck up" every 10 seconds)
Live - as mentioned above, safer/easier than carrying my tube amp on a train!



7.Would you say in your opinion that some forms of amplification become more useable due to the marketing and ease of access?

sorry i dont think i understand this question, but i'll try and answer anyway!
If you're talking about learning curves of certain products effecting thier useability and popularity i wouldn't say so.
Look at beginner modelling amps, they often have more dials and setting than a space ship, yet most people start with them. Then look at my amp, a 10W boutique combo with volume, treble, bass, reverb and power scaling - it's simple but it doesn't really attract more people.

Likewise, when you're a beginner, you have all these settings and options, but don't really know how to use them. Whilst a more experienced player can take this lower gear and make it sound better - though most of the time they just step up to better gear that doesn't need such time input!
And look at people with the POD Pro, or Axe FX, there is a steep learning curve, yet it doesn't put people off! I think there is always other factors that influence people ahead of the accessibility; be it cost, tone, portability.



8.Can you explain your reasoning for the above answer.
I think i just did haha
#10
1.Do you play guitar with the use of amplification.

Yes


2.Briefly describe your feelings on tube or solid state amps, ideally on build quality and tone. Feel free to elaborate and use comparisons.

Solid state is good for practice amps, but I would never want to gig with one. Tubes are superior in every way.


3.Please suggest a brand/brands of guitar amplification that you have been a supportive user of and elaborate on why and how it has been used. This may be the situation, or what is it about the characteristics of the amp ,sims or VST product that you like.

I do not support brands, I support quality products regardless of who made it. I also never use VSTs.


4.Do you prefer the use of digital amplification over traditional valve/solid state amps for instance, Amplitude, Vst amp rack (Cubase 7) Guitar rig or amp simulation units (Boss GT series) (Line 6 pod X3.)

No.

If to the previous question you answer yes please answer the following question:
If no was your response please move on to question 6:

5. Why is this, can you comment further on it beneficial for you?
N/A


6.Would you prefer the use of digital/amp sims software for any particular situation (Home,live,recording.) If so which situations and why.

No. I have the sound I want from my amp so there is no reason to attempt to simulate that sound digitally.
Amp simulation is only good for the (extremely rare) times I need to practice through headphones.


7.Would you say in your opinion that some forms of amplification become more useable due to the marketing and ease of access?

No. Real amps (i.e. tube) are no easier to use now than they were in the past. Marketing has no impact on this.
For people who use amp simulation, marketing has no impact on their usability.


8.Can you explain your reasoning for the above answer.

Usability is about how easy/hard something is to use and the quality of the product.
Marketing is about selling a product. 100 watt Marshall MGs sell because of good marketing, it doesn't make them useable.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
Last edited by GaryBillington at Jan 29, 2014,
#11
1.Do you play guitar with the use of amplification?
Yes

2.Briefly describe your feelings on tube or solid state amps, ideally on build quality and tone. Feel free to elaborate and use comparisons.
Solid state and digital amps have come a long way, but they aren't quite there yet. What they lack in tone, they make up for in convenience. Although all the best sounding amps I've ever played were tube amps, I think in some situations a digital amp is the better choice. If there were solid state amps that sounded as good as tube amps for a fraction of the cost, I'd gladly use those instead.

3.Please suggest a brand/brands of guitar amplification that you have been a supportive user of and elaborate on why and how it has been used. This may be the situation, or what is it about the characteristics of the amp ,sims or VST product that you like.
I like many amps. Fender, Marshall, Orange, Jet City, Mesa Boogie. I like them because they sound good to me.

4.Do you prefer the use of digital amplification over traditional valve/solid state amps for instance, Amplitude, Vst amp rack (Cubase 7) Guitar rig or amp simulation units (Boss GT series) (Line 6 pod X3.)
I don't prefer it but they can be a convenient alternative. However, given the choice, I'd prefer to use a real amp.

6.Would you prefer the use of digital/amp sims software for any particular situation (Home,live,recording.) If so which situations and why.
Digital amps/sims are more versatile and more portable. You can get more sounds out of something like an AXE-FX than out of a amp stack with a ton of pedals. Also, for beginners, I'd recommend a modelling amp like a Cube or a Vypyr over a cheap tube amp like a Valve Jr. It's better value for money. You get a wide range of tones instead of being stuck with one that you might not like.

7.Would you say in your opinion that some forms of amplification become more useable due to the marketing and ease of access?
Yes, to an extent.

8.Can you explain your reasoning for the above answer.
I think a lot of guitarists are biased against new technology, including myself. I don't know why, though. Marketing might help with that. There needs to be a balance between new and familiar features. If something is too "futuristic" it often alienates buyers.
I think word-of-mouth is more important than marketing. If something works well and sounds good, people will be drawn to it. If something is shit, it'll be revealed pretty quickly.
#12
1. I don't play guitar, but I play pedal steel and synth and those use an amp.


2. For my instruments, practically all amps are solid state.


3. I like Peavey amps, which are the industry standard for steel.


4. No.


6. Keyboard amps are more or less just PAs and nobody use sims for steel.


7. I don't see how marketing effects the ease of use for an amp.

Quote by sashki
Solid state and digital amps have come a long way, but they aren't quite there yet. What they lack in tone, they make up for in convenience. Although all the best sounding amps I've ever played were tube amps, I think in some situations a digital amp is the better choice. If there were solid state amps that sounded as good as tube amps for a fraction of the cost, I'd gladly use those instead.


There are tons of great clean amps, such as the Roland JC and Peavey Nashville, as well as great distorted amps like the Crate GX and Ampeg VH series.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Jan 29, 2014,
#13
Quote by theogonia777

There are tons of great clean amps, such as the Roland JC and Peavey Nashville, as well as great distorted amps like the Crate GX and Ampeg VH series.

Never played an Ampeg, but I really did not like the Crate GX. Around here a JC120 costs about £900. If I had that much to spend on an amp, I would not buy the JC120.
There's an amp called the Retro Wreck which I think sounds really good (at least in demos) but it's hard to find and quite expensive.

A lot of it is subjective. All the djent folk use Axe-FX stuff, and I think it suits their style of music very well. I couldn't imagine them playing through old Marshalls.

If it sounds good, then I don't care what technology it uses. However, of all the amps I've tried, I've had the best results with tubes. Just my opinion.
#14
1.Do you play guitar with the use of amplification.
>Yes.

2.Briefly describe your feelings on tube or solid state amps, ideally on build quality and tone. Feel free to elaborate and use comparisons.
>I guess im more of a tube fan, simply because they sound better when turned up loud, have better cleans. Also, louder at the same wattage.

3.Please suggest a brand/brands of guitar amplification that you have been a supportive user of and elaborate on why and how it has been used. This may be the situation, or what is it about the characteristics of the amp ,sims or VST product that you like.
>I use peavy amps. Pretty much all of them had been peavy, simply because those were being sold second hand when i was buying. I mainly play metal. I also use Amplitube 3 for recording. It sounds decent, but it cant beat a real amp. Yet.


4.Do you prefer the use of digital amplification over traditional valve/solid state amps for instance, Amplitude, Vst amp rack (Cubase 7) Guitar rig or amp simulation units (Boss GT series) (Line 6 pod X3.)
>For recording, yes, because its way more handy than luging around a giant amp and micing that shit up yo.

5. Why is this, can you comment further on it beneficial for you?
>like i said, its simpler.

6.Would you prefer the use of digital/amp sims software for any particular situation (Home,live,recording.) If so which situations and why.
>I use it just for recording, because its simpler and takes less time. For home playing and live shows i use actual amps, because they sound better.

7.Would you say in your opinion that some forms of amplification become more useable due to the marketing and ease of access?
>It's great i guess.

8.Can you explain your reasoning for the above answer.
>Not really. Just seems like a cool thing.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#15
1.Do you play guitar with the use of amplification.

Yes.


2.Briefly describe your feelings on tube or solid state amps, ideally on build quality and tone. Feel free to elaborate and use comparisons.

I prefer the sound of tube amps but it isn't a huge deal to me. I prefer amps with high build quality, as I imagine most do. I prefer the head-cab setup, 2x12 or more. I like amps with a warm tone, and by that I mean not the harshness and fizziness of a lot of solid-states.


3.Please suggest a brand/brands of guitar amplification that you have been a supportive user of and elaborate on why and how it has been used. This may be the situation, or what is it about the characteristics of the amp ,sims or VST product that you like.

I've used Peavey in the past, currently ENGL. Peavey has great all-round amps, especially metal though, for a very good price. While ENGL isn't very good on the price aspect, the tone and quality more than makes up for it, and ENGL makes amp very consistent with the kind of tone I like.

As far as amp sims, I'm fairly impartial, but I mainly use POD Farm for casual playing, and Poulin as well as TSE for recording.


4.Do you prefer the use of digital amplification over traditional valve/solid state amps for instance, Amplitude, Vst amp rack (Cubase 7) Guitar rig or amp simulation units (Boss GT series) (Line 6 pod X3.)


No, I prefer real amps.

If to the previous question you answer yes please answer the following question:
If no was your response please move on to question 6:


5. Why is this, can you comment further on it beneficial for you?


6.Would you prefer the use of digital/amp sims software for any particular situation (Home,live,recording.) If so which situations and why.

I like amp sims for recording and home playing due to their ease of use and volume level. But live, always an amp, personally speaking.


7.Would you say in your opinion that some forms of amplification become more useable due to the marketing and ease of access?

Definitely.


8.Can you explain your reasoning for the above answer.

There's a very large boom in amp companies, and the decrease in price allows easier access to them.
#16
1. All the time

2. Solid State amps are good for beginners because they're cheap, maintenance free and usually offer lots of different kinds of sounds. But tube amps nearly always sound better and the production of a guitars sound through a medium that is very traditional by technological standards is appealing to me.

3. Peavey. Mainly because they sound great. I use it for high gain stuff.
I also like Roland for their JC120. Amazing cleans.

4. I prefer tube-driven amps, and the pedals I use are all analog. but some of the better VST packages such as Overloud TH2 are really tempting because they sound great and are extremely versatile.

5. See above.

6. They're good at some things; they're easier to set up and they don't require maintenance.

7. Yes.

8. Mainly because of cost and practicality.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#17
1. Yes.

2. I prefer the sound of tube amps, especially for medium levels of distortion, but I'm not against solid states, especially for cleans. As far as quality, it depends, although SS amps don't have tubes that can blow; they either work or they don't and don't require maintenance.

3. For amps, I have owned Peavey, Fender, and Mesa/Boogie. I prefer Fender for their cleans and I like the variety of sounds that my Mesa/Boogie is capable of (I own a Mark IV widebody combo). The flexibility of many Mesa/Boogie amps in terms of tone shaping, whether it be through EQ options, number of channels, or options for pre- and power amp tubes is what draws me to their brand. Peavey was just my first amp and I have no love for them.

4.No.

6. Prefer it? Only if I was going after a very particular sound and didn't have access to that particular type of amp; otherwise, I prefer the real thing.

7. No.

8. I don't think with analog amplification that ease of use has any correlation with marketing. As for digital amplification, I don't have any experience, but generally speaking people will want more bang for their buck, which usually means more options.
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at Jan 29, 2014,
#18
>Yes, acoustics is for grandpas (I really don't care about acoustics, I'll probably never get one)
>I prefer a tube amp, but some solid states are okay I guess
>I like my Fender Excelsior but the Laney and Orange heads I've tried are awesome.
>Nah dawg, nah
>no
>yes
>no
banned