#1
Hi I'm wanting some Active speakers for my band we play alternative rock, 2x guitars, bass,drums and 3x vocals, we play in local pubs and venues with around 50-100 people and I've seen ALOT of speakers, mackie, JBL, wharfdale ect but for the price how do these speakers fair (Not heard of the make and not many reviews) and will they do the job until we can afford to get a top of the range pa setup?

Ekho PL15A http://www.electromarket.co.uk/ssa0609

Ekho RS15A http://www.electromarket.co.uk/ssa2148
#2
i really can't tell anything other than an aesthetic difference between the two, the descriptions are identical. the PL15A looks like it can be used with speaker poles. the RS15 looks like it is more designed to be a 'wedge' that lays on the ground for monitoring.

you could use the PL for mains and the RS for monitors.

the speakers are 400 watts a piece, and it looks like both packages come with two of them. i'd say it'd get you by. i can't really speak on the quality, it already uses some disreputable tactics of advertising 'peak' power over RMS and it also combines the two cabinets power handling as well. so normally this setup would be advertised as a 2x400 watt system, but they advertise it as a 1600 watt system.

it should get you by for a while as long as it holds up.
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#3
Judging by the price, I'd say they'll not sound good but they'll do the job.
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#4
Quote by NotNowHalifax
Hi I'm wanting some Active speakers for my band we play alternative rock, 2x guitars, bass,drums and 3x vocals, we play in local pubs and venues with around 50-100 people and I've seen ALOT of speakers, mackie, JBL, wharfdale ect but for the price how do these speakers fair (Not heard of the make and not many reviews) and will they do the job until we can afford to get a top of the range pa setup?

Ekho PL15A http://www.electromarket.co.uk/ssa0609

Ekho RS15A http://www.electromarket.co.uk/ssa2148


No way to know anything about if or how well these will do the job; it's not a brand I've seen before.

If you were here in the US, I'd probably tell you to budget at least $1000 for a PA for that size venue before you'd get something reasonably decent. That would include a small, cheap multi-input mixer and a decent pair of active speakers. Here in the US I'd direct you to Carvin, which has a pair of PM15A's with cables for $599 that would function as a very good core. You'd have to add horn stands, of course, and you want those speakers well above the heads of the crowd and as close in to the sides of the band as you can go without feedback.

We just set up a pair of these, a mixer and a small stereo power amp for a beginner band in just such a situation. We quickly ran into an issue where they couldn't hear themselves and the folks right in front of the stage couldn't hear vocals (though the rest of the room was covered), but we found an ancient Shure Vocalmaster (two tall columns of small speakers) dirt cheap and we laid one column down in front of the band, tilted back facing the audience, and the other one laying down behind IT facing the band (monitor!). With the small stereo power amp we could control both the front fill and the monitor volume. That's about the cheapest I've ever set up a reasonably competent PA. If you've only got 50-100 people, you're going to have the most problem with keeping the drummer under control -- his volume level affects everything else. It's even worth setting up plexi panels around him and keeping the mikes away from the drums; if you find yourself with a lot of drums leaking into the PA, the whole thing goes sideways fast.
Last edited by dspellman at Jan 29, 2014,
#5
Quote by gumbilicious
i really can't tell anything other than an aesthetic difference between the two, the descriptions are identical. the PL15A looks like it can be used with speaker poles. the RS15 looks like it is more designed to be a 'wedge' that lays on the ground for monitoring.

you could use the PL for mains and the RS for monitors.

the speakers are 400 watts a piece, and it looks like both packages come with two of them. i'd say it'd get you by. i can't really speak on the quality, it already uses some disreputable tactics of advertising 'peak' power over RMS and it also combines the two cabinets power handling as well. so normally this setup would be advertised as a 2x400 watt system, but they advertise it as a 1600 watt system.

it should get you by for a while as long as it holds up.



The only difference I can see between the 2 is the PL15A has 125db and the RS15 has 126db (which I've read is more important than wattage) they both have holes for stands but the PL15A has a way to tighten them so they are more sturdy, yeah most places I've seen are advertised with the max wattage they can produce but unless they are 4ohms (which I read somewhere they are) they won't reach the max wattage
#6
Quote by dspellman
No way to know anything about if or how well these will do the job; it's not a brand I've seen before.

If you were here in the US, I'd probably tell you to budget at least $1000 for a PA for that size venue before you'd get something reasonably decent. That would include a small, cheap multi-input mixer and a decent pair of active speakers. Here in the US I'd direct you to Carvin, which has a pair of PM15A's with cables for $599 that would function as a very good core. You'd have to add horn stands, of course, and you want those speakers well above the heads of the crowd and as close in to the sides of the band as you can go without feedback.

We just set up a pair of these, a mixer and a small stereo power amp for a beginner band in just such a situation. We quickly ran into an issue where they couldn't hear themselves and the folks right in front of the stage couldn't hear vocals (though the rest of the room was covered), but we found an ancient Shure Vocalmaster (two tall columns of small speakers) dirt cheap and we laid one column down in front of the band, tilted back facing the audience, and the other one laying down behind IT facing the band (monitor!). With the small stereo power amp we could control both the front fill and the monitor volume. That's about the cheapest I've ever set up a reasonably competent PA. If you've only got 50-100 people, you're going to have the most problem with keeping the drummer under control -- his volume level affects everything else. It's even worth setting up plexi panels around him and keeping the mikes away from the drums; if you find yourself with a lot of drums leaking into the PA, the whole thing goes sideways fast.

I've looked into more expensive setups but at the moment its not an option this will sort of be a quick fix and when we do geta better setup the speakers I linked have side stands to be used as monitors so all would not be lost, before one of our speakers went we had 2 400watt passive speakers and they seemed to do the job at the venues we played even getting us compliments, on paper the Ekho ones look even better and being active will save us on car space and setting up time, but thank you for the advice bang on about the drummer without him we could probably shout over the guitars haha
#7
Your best bet is to be patient and watch the used market. PA gear often sells quite cheaply used. I've never heard of that brand, sorry.
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#8
Quote by NotNowHalifax
bang on about the drummer without him we could probably shout over the guitars haha


At one point we had everyone running direct in, including the drummer (who was forced, kicking and screaming, to use electronic drums) -- keys, drums, bass, guitars. Each of us had a modeler or preamp (except the keys) that we ran into the mixer. A girlfriend of mine came over one evening while we were playing and was a little freaked out -- all she heard was a quiet *tink**click**tappity-tappity* and then people shouting (singing) into mikes. We handed her a set of headphones and her eyes bugged out. Our sound guy had everything dialed into Full Arena Mode and it sounded huge through the cans.

The drummer eventually came to love the electronics, and even when he went to his Monster Onstage Set, he set them up with electronic pads so that he could switch to some of the cooler presets he'd worked up.
#9
Quote by NotNowHalifax
The only difference I can see between the 2 is the PL15A has 125db and the RS15 has 126db (which I've read is more important than wattage)

What this means is that the speakers in the RS are slightly more efficient, and therefore will be just a bit louder. With that small of a difference, I'm not really sure how noticeable it would be.

For small club setups, Behringer is a good brand to look into. While I find their guitar equipment to be hit or miss, the Behringer PA gear for the most part, sounds pretty decent and is reliable. Plus, it's very affordable.

I play in two different bands. One being my original band that's my main focus, and a cover band I do on the side for fun, money, and good practice. I'm fortunate that in my main band we rarely have to haul around a PA because we're either playing an opening slot for a touring act, at a venue with house sound, or I'm able to work out a deal with the venue to book sound. However, with the cover band, we do have to set up a PA in most places, and two of the mains we use (15's) are Behringer, and I believe the board is too.

In my experience playing in smalls bars you're not as much "running sound" as you are doing "damage control". So many of them are not built with live music in mind, and you kind of have to live with "well, it sounds pretty good, that's the best it's going to get". That being said, I'd make reliability/durability one of your top factors in purchasing PA equipment for your needs.

In many smaller places, it's not necessary to have everything mic'ed up. Vocals, obviously, but in terms of drums it's generally ok to just have the kick and snare mic'd in such a situation. Your guitars and bass, as long as everyone can hear passably on stage, don't necessarily need to be mic'd in most small venues, especially if it's a lively room. You can probably get by with a powered mixer, two 15's for mains, and enough monitors so everyone who needs to hear vocals can do so.

Also, look used! It's fairly easy to find a steal of a deal on used PA gear.
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