#1
How do you know what can go together do you just play over and over until you find something. Is there a basic guide to it. I was playing C G Em and Am in that order and sounds good to me but my friend said that will sound bad. Maybe im tone deaf or something but I think it sounds ok.

Any advice on how you put chords together would be appreciated.
#2
Learning basic music theory would help. I like the complete idiots guide to music theory, it's not guitar-specific but it starts from the basics without being patronising. There are probably free online resources too which will teach you stuff (or the musician talk forum here will help, too).

Your friend's a dumbass, don't listen to him/her. You can play non-diatonic (basically from outside the scale) chords and they can still sound good. That progression you've come up with mightn't be one of the more usual ones, but that doesn't mean it's wrong, either.

EDIT: I was going to type out a big thing for you but it quickly became apparent I'd be skimming it too much and maybe confusing you. I know the people in the musician talk forum frequently suggest checking out the www.musictheory.net website (free I think, I've never really checked it) so it might be worth a look. I had a very quick look and I think these lessons might help with what you're asking:

http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/40

http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/43

http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/57

Or you can just go to the lessons page and work your way through them http://www.musictheory.net/lessons
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Jan 29, 2014,
#3
Quote by BassBen93
How do you know what can go together do you just play over and over until you find something. Is there a basic guide to it. I was playing C G Em and Am in that order and sounds good to me but my friend said that will sound bad. Maybe im tone deaf or something but I think it sounds ok.

Any advice on how you put chords together would be appreciated.


That chord progression has common or shared notes which helps link those chords together. Try some chord progressions using this method.
#4
thanks im gonna do some reading up then as I have snapped a string and cant replace it til im payed on the first.
#5
You should learn how chords are constructed from scales, how the entire scale in a given key yields chords that are "harmonized" to that scale, and it's from that harmonized scale that we extract chord "progressions" that are pretty much standard.
You don't have to get heavily involved with theory, but this sort of thing will add greatly to your understanding "how it all goes together".
Of course, many fine players have felt free to disregard all that.....
#6
Quote by BassBen93
How do you know what can go together do you just play over and over until you find something. Is there a basic guide to it. I was playing C G Em and Am in that order and sounds good to me but my friend said that will sound bad. Maybe im tone deaf or something but I think it sounds ok.

Any advice on how you put chords together would be appreciated.
When dealing with major keys, and many popular songs, you'll find the chords formed on the 1st, 4th, & 5th notes of the scale, will be the most prevalent.

You do have to learn the major scales though.

For example, those chords in C major, are C (1st or tonic), F (4th ), & G (5th).

Couple of quick points. Why does everyone assume that their friends know more than them about every topic?

All 4 of the chords in your progression occur naturally in both the key of C major / A minor, or G major / E minor. (Those major and minor keys use the same notes, but have different starting notes, and different chord sequences).

Chord are usually numbered in any given key, using Roman numerals. Upper case are major chords, lower case are minor chords.

So, if we assume the key of C major, (Most probable choice), your progression would be: I, (C major), V (G major), iii (E minor), & vi (A minor).

There's absolutely nothing wrong with 1, 5, 3, 6 as a progression. It happens all the time.

And dude, buy two packs of strings this time. After you have a backup set, you can get away with one pack at a time.
#7
Quote by Captaincranky

Couple of quick points. Why does everyone assume that their friends know more than them about every topic?


Yeah

This happens in the gear threads a lot, people make threads saying their friend has told them to do something (or warned them not to do something or bad things will happen) and more often than not the person making the thread is more in the right than the friend...

Though thinking back to when I was a pretty new player I listened to some guff from friends too, because they'd been playing longer and I assumed they knew better. Maybe that's it. Or maybe they just don't have much self-confidence... which probably isn't too bad, I'd say it's better than misplaced confidence anyway (though of course only problem being, you think you know less than people who actually know less than you do ).

But yeah it's got to the point where I basically say people should be very wary about who they listen to. There's this mentality at the moment that there's a lot of nonsense posted online (and that may well be true, depending on what parts of the net you hang out in, I suppose), but in my experience people in the "real world" say just as silly things, maybe worse.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Feb 1, 2014,
#8
Gosh, I found C, G, Am, Em all the way back to the 16th century.

http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/f/fairport_convention/matty_groves_ver3_crd.htm

Use the "Transpose" arrows to bring this to Am. (its up a 4th @ Dm, to accommodate the late Sandy Denny of "Fairport Convention").

In any case, it contains only the I, V, iii, & vi chords. (The iii appears in different transcriptions by different people). At the very least it's hammered on in passing. (There are 2 other chord tabs @ UG you can compare to the one I linked).

Here's the Wiki page on "Matty Groves". The song was resurrected during the 60's by Joan Baez and others, but first record of it in print, was in the 1600's!

So, tell your buddy to get in touch with his Renaissance self, and check it out

"Starts in Church, and ends with a double murder"....http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jz-iHLPSqM

(OK, this song is ostensibly NOT in C major, it's in the relative minor, A minor).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 1, 2014,
#9
Yep as they stated its all in music theory. Some stuff doesn't follow the 'formulas'.

Something that helped me in the beginning was Music Theory for Dummies, great start for the beginner.