#1
So, I just found a video on YouTube where a guy was showing off his drum programming skills.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLwajoqBe0s

It got me thinking. What are some metal albums featuring programmed drums? Necrophagist's debut is an obvious first mention, and I remember hearing that at least one Meshuggah album was recorded with programmed drums.
What are some other notable albums?
#2
Anything by Sithu Aye
Anything by Plini
Animals as Leaders by Animals as Leaders

I believe Periphery's first album was programmed with Superior Drummer 2.0 via the use of a MIDI drumkit. Their more recent work might've been done like this too, I'm not sure. Some of the glitchy drum sounds are obviously programmed.

It seems to be more common with anything related to 'djent'.
Guitars & Gear:
Parker Nitefly M
Sumer Metal Driver
Ibanez RGD2120Z
AMT SS-11B
Two Notes Torpedo CAB
Last edited by Emperor's Child at Jan 30, 2014,
#3
god flesh,,,a band called old which used to be old lady drivers. alot of metal albums feature triggered kits but thats a little different. i know emperor had a thank you in the ix cd for a dm5 which is a drum brain. i will try to think of some more later.
#5
It can sound great and you can not notice or it can sound awful.


The Ziltoid album is an example of it sounding awful.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#9
Fear Factory's album ‘The Industrialist’ has programmed drums and it sounds awesome!
#12
Since this is about drums in metal, I want to ask: were osdm albums from the early '90's filled with trigger drums? I have a friend who is convinced work by early at the gates, sentenced and cryptopsy all used triggers on their debuts.
#14
As long as it sounds natural (as in, a human can actually play it), I don't see an issue with programmed drums.
#15
Quote by Morphogenesis26
Since this is about drums in metal, I want to ask: were osdm albums from the early '90's filled with trigger drums? I have a friend who is convinced work by early at the gates, sentenced and cryptopsy all used triggers on their debuts.
It's very possible that they did. The technology certainly could've and would've been available in the 90's. It's even kind of a tabu thing to talk about, triggers in beloved "old school" metal albums, I've noticed. So a lot of people just flat out argue against the idea because they don't want it to be so. But that's what we humans excel at, believing in what we wish to be true, isn't it? And yet, often the very same people don't have anything against one of the most respected cult releases, Sarcofago's INRI, having electronic drum sounds. Afterall, electronic kits are triggered drums. None So Vile probably had a trigger on the bass drum(s), that sound is ridiculously clicky, don't remember ATG or early Sentenced drum sounds that well, but with the attitude of the fans being what it is, I wouldn't be too surprised if a lot of bands denied any such methods having been used at the source.

I don't really see the big deal. I mean, the way they were used back then, it was only a means of achieving a certain type of sound. You can mix a triggered sound with the mic'd sound or you can just use a triggered sample, it gives you more to work with sound-wise. It's a tool just like an EQ. On the other hand it does give you the ability to quantize everything you play afterwards, which is very common these days. In metal, it pretty much used to be about getting your bass drum to stand out of the mix easier and better, but it's gotten to the point where the whole kit is triggered, and often corrected with quantization. I don't think that's cool, especially if you're gonna claim you played the drums on that album, because it's no different to just programming the drums on your laptop, but it can be easier to lay the drum tracks down that way, so again, they're a neat tool if that's what you're using 'em for.
#17
Quote by Sanitarium91
It's very possible that they did. The technology certainly could've and would've been available in the 90's. It's even kind of a tabu thing to talk about, triggers in beloved "old school" metal albums, I've noticed. So a lot of people just flat out argue against the idea because they don't want it to be so. But that's what we humans excel at, believing in what we wish to be true, isn't it? And yet, often the very same people don't have anything against one of the most respected cult releases, Sarcofago's INRI, having electronic drum sounds. Afterall, electronic kits are triggered drums. None So Vile probably had a trigger on the bass drum(s), that sound is ridiculously clicky, don't remember ATG or early Sentenced drum sounds that well, but with the attitude of the fans being what it is, I wouldn't be too surprised if a lot of bands denied any such methods having been used at the source.

I don't really see the big deal. I mean, the way they were used back then, it was only a means of achieving a certain type of sound. You can mix a triggered sound with the mic'd sound or you can just use a triggered sample, it gives you more to work with sound-wise. It's a tool just like an EQ. On the other hand it does give you the ability to quantize everything you play afterwards, which is very common these days. In metal, it pretty much used to be about getting your bass drum to stand out of the mix easier and better, but it's gotten to the point where the whole kit is triggered, and often corrected with quantization. I don't think that's cool, especially if you're gonna claim you played the drums on that album, because it's no different to just programming the drums on your laptop, but it can be easier to lay the drum tracks down that way, so again, they're a neat tool if that's what you're using 'em for.

It doesn't bother me if they're triggered or not, it's just that this is the kind of person who discredits the bands and then apes the drummer in Asking Alexandria as being better. So, it's irritating to hear when the person doesn't even know, but I was hoping to find out to prove him wrong. >_> thanks, though.
#18
Precisely - Mental Funeral could have programmed percussion for all I care - its the summation of the content and whether or not it exceeds the perceived value of the individual parts is what really matters.

Though on the same token, I find that when used effectively that electronic percussion really adds to music - ala Focus or any of the early Godflesh releases (Godflesh ep thru to Slavestate)
HESSIAN HAREM
FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE HESSIAN CULTURE. STAY TRUE.
#19
Quote by Morphogenesis26
It doesn't bother me if they're triggered or not, it's just that this is the kind of person who discredits the bands and then apes the drummer in Asking Alexandria as being better. So, it's irritating to hear when the person doesn't even know, but I was hoping to find out to prove him wrong. >_> thanks, though.
Well, again, I don't see how triggers are supposed discredit the bands so I don't see the need to prove anyone wrong on this. Reinert used pedal triggers on Focus, but that doesn't take anything away from his performance. Infact, I think most Morrisound/Scott Burns albums had triggered bass drums to achieve the sound. After all, it made their job as audio engineers much easier, because that's the sound they were going for and there wasn't much room for dynamics in a music where everything's so in your face. I could argue that it wasn't always that necessary, or that they could've mixed things a bit differently sometimes, but that was their staple, and people went to them when that was the sound they wanted.

Your friend obviously thinks his drummer is better than your drummer cause it's his drummer. It's the type of drumming he likes, it's the type of music he likes. Arguing who is better in the field of music tends to be silly, because people are usually pretty blindly on the side of the musicians whose music they like themselves.
#20
Quote by Helloween4Ever
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22PsFtc9y60

Programmed drums at its finest.

He was actually on about either finishing it or doing more music in that vein the other month. That said I've not heard him mention anything about it since, but I tend to see him at least once a fortnight, if not once a week, so I might ask about it next time I see him. He seems more into film than music at the moment though, and I think that's taking more of his creative energies.