#1
I was wondering here, if someone wants to learn bass, and have some previous knowledge with the guitar,will that make it easier?

My "main" instrument is the guitar,but i plan on learning the bass to play some simple bass lines and some songs rythms, and to become a better musician in general.

I know there are different techinques and all,but how much easier will it be?

Thanks.
#2
Now, I don't play bass but to my knowledge:
- Yes it will help make it a lot easier
- A number of techniques are different (e.g. left hand fingering)
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#3
It will be a lot easier. But it depends entirely on what you want to do and how far you want to take it. If you pick up a bass, you probably won't have any problems whatsoever. Switching between the two isn't difficult at all. If you want to play with your fingers as opposed to picks, it becomes more difficult. If you want slap, it becomes much more difficult. If you approach it like a 4-string guitar, the transition is easy. You'll only encounter problems once you deviate from that. Composition will be the most difficult transition, not playing. But again, that depends on what you want to do.

And you can always get a Bass VI. Those are really fun to use.
Last edited by JELIFISH19 at Jan 31, 2014,
#4
I have some experience fingerpicking on acoustic (so far i play acoustic,not electric).
I dont plan on becoming the next John Paul Jones or anything, so i think i will give the bass a try.
#5
Loads easier.

Now, that's not to say if you are a good guitar player that the first time you pick up a bass you'll be a virtuoso on it- that's not how it works, because there are several different techniques on bass which you don't really do on guitar. And you have to think slightly differently from guitar, too.

But yeah, it helps a lot. There are a lot of things which are the same (or similar) and once you get your head round them I'd say you progress far quicker than someone who's never played guitar.
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#6
Quote by TripaEscorrida
I have some experience fingerpicking on acoustic (so far i play acoustic,not electric).
I dont plan on becoming the next John Paul Jones or anything, so i think i will give the bass a try.


fingerpicking on an acoustic is night and day from a bass
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#7
Quote by KerNeL_KLuTcH
fingerpicking on an acoustic is night and day from a bass


Sorry,didnt understood that.

P.S.:If its a figure of speech, sorry for not getting it but english isnt my native language.
#8
Fingerpicking on a guitar is not the same as doing it on a bass is what he meant.

From a music theory and fretboard knowledge, it will make that part easier. But it will be much easier if you approach it as a brand new instrument to learn, not just a guitar with less strings. The techniques are different and your role in the band is different. You need to be more aware of keeping consistent groove and rhythm when playing bass. Most guitarists (myself included) tend to play far too many notes or fills when taking up bass at first. Bass is as much about playing notes and it is about leaving space in your bass lines.
#9
Bass is as much about playing notes and it is about leaving space in your bass lines.


Then again, so is playing the guitar well. :P
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#10
Quote by Ziphoblat
Then again, so is playing the guitar well. :P


Yes, but most guitarist adhere to the shred dictum. While you can get away with that in guitar, you rarely can get away with that on bass.
#11
I added bass to my abilities and having played regular guitars (electric, acoustic) really helps a lot with the transition. For a long time, I could sit and play bass when the bass player wasn't there. But I approached it as a guitar player trying to hit root notes and then add something a little different.

Then I decided to really learn bass. I watched some online videos (as said above, there's a right way to play bass with your fingers and it's like relearning an instrument). If you want to thump the strings, you might as well devote some time to playing bass with your fingers each night to that. Otherwise, you can just keep playing with a pick.

But you want to move beyond being a guitar player with lower pitched strings and really understand your new roll in supporting the drums and keeping the groove going. The Victor Wooten Groove Workshop DVDs really helped me a lot.

Knowing where the notes are on a bass is easy for a guitarist and you probably already know where the notes of the chords are, so yes, you're way ahead. One of the best things about learning bass is that when you go back to playing lead and rhythm guitar, you'll have a new way of looking at things and that helped me a lot.
#12
Quote by anarkee
Yes, but most guitarist adhere to the shred dictum. While you can get away with that in guitar, you rarely can get away with that on bass.


While I agree, I think it's just that it's more accepted on guitar rather than that the sonic result is any less unpleasant. A good shred solo is definitely possible, but it still has dynamics and relatively large amount of space between certain notes... as do the successful applications of fast playing on bass (the fills in YYZ come to mind).

But yeah, bass is definitely a mind-set. However, being comfortable with that mind-set will definitely improve any guitarists lines too.
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#13
Quote by Ziphoblat
While I agree, I think it's just that it's more accepted on guitar rather than that the sonic result is any less unpleasant. A good shred solo is definitely possible, but it still has dynamics and relatively large amount of space between certain notes... as do the successful applications of fast playing on bass (the fills in YYZ come to mind).


Is it? Shred is normally considered pretty uncool, I thought That being said, even a shred fan like me prefers the stuff with feeling (alongside little bits of the speedier stuff) than just balls-to-the-wall sweeped arpeggios for 20 minutes. Though sometimes just letting rip can (IMO) be awesome too (e.g. eruption, circles by satch etc.).

This may well be me getting the wrong end of the stick here, but most bass vids I see on youtube (of demonstrating kit, I mean, not people messing about in their bedrooms) seem to use a lot more advanced techniques than guitar demos (which by and large seem to normally use a "less is more" approach). Maybe it's because bass is seen as a more background instrument that showing off is less frowned-upon, I dunno.

Regarding the thing about treating it like a different instrument, I agree. At the same time, I played drums before guitar (and piano before that) so I'm not sure I really think like a guitarist, either.

Mainly though I can't believe I didn't get a bass sooner. It's awesome fun. And while it's definitely different in the ways you guys are saying, there's enough overlap that you feel that you're slightly beating the system i.e. getting maximum fun for minimum (learning) effort.

Quote by Ziphoblat

But yeah, bass is definitely a mind-set. However, being comfortable with that mind-set will definitely improve any guitarists lines too.


Yeah I think having at least some knowledge of what every member of the band does is bound to help.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Feb 1, 2014,
#14
For me, picking up a bass was more about forgetting what I'd learned on a guitar and learning to play bass with fingers rather than pick. Yeah, you CAN play bass with a pick, but it's one of the first things that will give you a way as a guitar player filling in, and not a "real" bass player.

The second thing you have to learn is where and when you should be playing a bass note. You and the drummer are a pair, and if you really want to play bass well, try to isolate the bass/drum tracks -- and practice as much as you can with a drum track rather than with the guitars. You'll still need to know what key you're in and where the chords go in a song, but you're part and parcel of "the Pocket" when you play bass well.
#15
Quote by dspellman
For me, picking up a bass was more about forgetting what I'd learned on a guitar and learning to play bass with fingers rather than pick. Yeah, you CAN play bass with a pick, but it's one of the first things that will give you a way as a guitar player filling in, and not a "real" bass player.


While I agree one should try to learn to play with fingers, those that play with a pick instead are just as "real" as those who play with fingers. It gives a different sound to fingers and some people prefer that tone.
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#16
Quote by reincarnator
While I agree one should try to learn to play with fingers, those that play with a pick instead are just as "real" as those who play with fingers. It gives a different sound to fingers and some people prefer that tone.

How people play their bass is actually a great indicator of if they're any good at playing it at all. I'm yet to come across a bassist I would consider 'good' who could ONLY play well with a pick, or ONLY play well with fingers. Good bassists can do both, and will pick the best technique for the style.
#17
Back in the day bassists were failed guitarists, I know I was one.
Played guitar for about a year and got nowhere so I turned to Bass, bought my first Bass on Saturday and gigged the following Friday, that was in 1962.
Knowing the guitar chord structures helped me great deal.
Bassist then and now work out their lines form the chord structure of the piece being played.
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#18
Quote by chatterbox272
How people play their bass is actually a great indicator of if they're any good at playing it at all. I'm yet to come across a bassist I would consider 'good' who could ONLY play well with a pick, or ONLY play well with fingers. Good bassists can do both, and will pick the best technique for the style.


Some people can't do both, I played with a plectrum for around 28 years until I suffered a severe double Colles fracture of the right wrist in 1990, I started playing with the plaster caste still on but had to use my fingers, after the caste was removed the dexterity was reduced in my wrist regarding holding a plectrum so now I just use my fingers.
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450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
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#19
Depends greatly on the type of music you're playing.

If you're playing simple stuff, you can play a song as soon as you learn the notes.

But if you're playing technical death metal... lol... no. The only thing there is that your previous experience with learning songs and their notes and tablature is easy. But playing it? Nah. Takes time. Especially if you venture into Slap and Fretless territory.
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#20
What is technical death metal?
G&L L2500
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450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
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#22
About as much use as a chocolate fireguard.
G&L L2500
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Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn