#1
Like everyone (at least I hope everyone), I think of a melody but I can't really put into onto my guitar, I quickly record the melody/riff by singing so I could have for the future, however, no matter how hard I try, I just can't figure out how to put the melody onto my guitar, I can only figure out like 2 notes or whatever before I'm left a trial and error method which proves pretty ineffective. Thanks in advance.
#2
I think you're thinking too much. If you learn strumming or picking patterns.
Most pop songs are just that. With whatever chord progression.

Everytime I pick up my guitar. Im like a riff making machine.lol

What kind of music do you wish to write or play?
Do you what a double stop is?
Do you know how the play 12 bars? The rhythm. The sequence the I, IV,V are to
be played.
Last edited by smc818 at Feb 1, 2014,
#3
Play a scale on your guitar and practise hitting each note with your voice, it will help you familiarise where notes are on your guitar relative to your voice, hope that it helps.

also there is nothing wrong with trial and error
#4
Quote by smc818
I think you're thinking too much. If you learn strumming or picking patterns.
Most pop songs are just that. With whatever chord progression.

Everytime I pick up my guitar. Im like a riff making machine.lol

What kind of music do you wish to write or play?
Do you what a double stop is?
Do you know how the play 12 bars? The rhythm. The sequence the I, IV,V are to
be played.


What does this have to do with transposing a melody from you're head to the guitar?


Ts, you should start doing some ear training. It will help you A LOT!
A good place to start would be to do what you're allready trying to do, but instaed of figuring out you're own melodies, try to figure out a famous and simple one. Like twinkle twinkle star or something similar.Keep doing this for a while and you won't have any trouble playing whats in you're head.

Sorry for bad english.
#5
You have a shit ear and/or a shit understanding of how intervals work on the guitar fretboard. train your ear and memorize the fretboard.
#6
Yeah, this is a pretty common situation when your ear isn't very good.

The way I think of it is that you don't have an actual melody in your head. You have the idea of a melody in your head. But the pitches aren't well defined - they're more like "an idea of a pitch."

When you sing it, you don't really notice that your pitches are sort of sloppy because you don't hear them well enough. So yeah, you think you've recorded the melody in your head.

And then you sit down at the guitar, where each pitch is precisely defined, and it doesn't match.

So work on your ear. Transcribe, use the funcitonal ear trainer, etc.
#7
Quote by The Swede Dude
What does this have to do with transposing a melody from you're head to the guitar?


Ts, you should start doing some ear training. It will help you A LOT!
A good place to start would be to do what you're allready trying to do, but instaed of figuring out you're own melodies, try to figure out a famous and simple one. Like twinkle twinkle star or something similar.Keep doing this for a while and you won't have any trouble playing whats in you're head.

Sorry for bad english.


Well...If I wanna write rock. I might wanna just bust out with some pentatonic scale,
blues scale or something in a minor scale. Play something simple with a catchy rhythm. Use double stops or whatever. Not micro manage all the notes.
For the A part of the song. Loop it 4 times or 6 times...ect

Then just raise the pitch of that rhythm to a perfect 4th ot 5th for a couple of loops.

Then play 3 or 4 chords (lets those bad boys ring/ whole notes) for a couple of loops. it'll be like a chorus part.

I can bascailly do the samething if I want to write metal. Use dissonance intervals...ect


If I want to write a ballad or whatever. Im just use the chorus type formula using
3 or 4 chords progression.

Then lay down tracks. Chose a simple drum beat loop.
Then just strike a chord for 1 full measure for each chord,(at first)
Then I'll simply just going to play arpeggios over them.
Use this as a guide. ( you don't necessary need to leave it in the song)
It's the same with the drum track.


Then I'll simply try different strumming or plucking patterns over them.
The process is the same if I want to write a melody over them.
I use questions and answers phrasing.

Play the bass over them using the same method.

If you don't have a recorder...you need to get one.
If you don't have a drummer. You need to get a very good drum machine.
I can spend more time on drums than guitars. It's not rocket science to play power chords. The drum makes it sound cool. Different style of drums
Last edited by smc818 at Feb 1, 2014,
#8
Quote by smc818
Well...If I wanna write rock. I might wanna just bust out with some pentatonic scale,
blues scale or something in a minor scale. Play something simple with a catchy rhythm. Use double stops or whatever. Not micro manage all the notes.
For the A part of the song. Loop it 4 times or 6 times...ect

Then just raise the pitch of that rhythm to a perfect 4th ot 5th for a couple of loops.

Then play 3 or 4 chords (lets those bad boys ring/ whole notes) for a couple of loops. it'll be like a chorus part.

I can bascailly do the samething if I want to write metal. Use dissonance intervals...ect


If I want to write a ballad or whatever. Im just use the chorus type formula using
3 or 4 chords progression.

Then lay down tracks. Chose a simple drum beat loop.
Then just strike a chord for 1 full measure for each chord,(at first)
Then I'll simply just going to play arpeggios over them.
Use this as a guide. ( you don't necessary need to leave it in the song)
It's the same with the drum track.


Then I'll simply try different strumming or plucking patterns over them.
The process is the same if I want to write a melody over them.
I use questions and answers phrasing.

Play the bass over them using the same method.

If you don't have a recorder...you need to get one.
If you don't have a drummer. You need to get a very good drum machine.
I can spend more time on drums than guitars. It's not rocket science to play power chords. The drum makes it sound cool. Different style of drums


Seriously. Are you a troll? Please just leave this thread if you don't have anything whorty of mentioning.
#9
You need to train your ear/mind to recognize specific intervals. It's a pain in the ass in all possible meanings of the phrase, but it will help you with almost every aspect of writing and transcribing music.
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#10
Quote by The Swede Dude
Seriously. Are you a troll? Please just leave this thread if you don't have anything whorty of mentioning.


really ? how many accounts to this site do you have?

I get all kinds of riif and melody in my head. A lot of time the notes are being played
to a certain drum beat. It might be from drumming I heard from a song.
It needs more cow bells....

Do youself a favor. Get a good drum machine. Learn to recognize
them as you would learn any scales. it'll make life a lot easier to transcribe
what you really heard as a whole in your head.

Speaking of drum beats. I march to my own drum beats. Beats me what the TS heard
in his head.

what I hear in my head arnt always power chords or sus chords.
A simply exercise...I play the root note with other notes 2,3,-3,-5,-6, octive...ect
Not so much to train my ear to hear other people's stuff. It more to identify
what I heard in my head. it has nothing to do with intervals or theory.
If what I hear in my head falls into whatever intervals, then it just helps me
to keep track of what I heard.
Last edited by smc818 at Feb 2, 2014,
#11
Train you aural skills(develop a good ear), learn scales and intervals, and practice memorizing pitches on your guitar(a part of aural skill development). But make sure your guitar is tuned to a specific tuning.

When you try to memorize pitches of open strings and/or pitches of notes on any fret of the guitar, try first also naming the note you are playing, according to your guitar tuning.

In standard tuning, the note on the 3rd fret on the 3rd string(the G string) is A#/Bb. In Eb tuning(half-step down), the note on the same fret and same string would be an A. In standard D it woul G#/Ab. And so on.

Over time(it'll take a while for sure), when you are used to all the sounds iof notes on all frets you regularly use, you will be able to recognize them even when you'll listen to a record of your own/someone else's playing. And moreso, you will be able to tell what notes are being played, while you play them yourself, even without looking at them, while playing.

I hope my advice helps you.
#12
If you are singing it and still can't translate it to guitar, I suggest you do some ear training by learning some traditional melodies, and then some melodies and songs by your favorite artists on the guitar.
#13
Note that when you play along with melodies to train your ears, don't just focus on the guitar and bass lines. When you play your favorite songs, try to play what the singer is singing. It's usually not too fast and just one note at a time, so you can get better at matching what you hear with what your fingers need to do (it's like touch typing on a keyboard). As this skill develops, you'll be able to very quickly take the ideas in your head and get them onto the fretboard. (this what a lot of the folks above are emphasizing).