#1
Hi, I have a Charvel Pro-Mod So Cal (Floyd Rose FRT-O2000 Double Locking Tremolo) but it's a pain in the ass to do all the stuff everytime i change the tuning for drop d or drop c for example...

I've searched the net and found that there is a system called tremol-no that could work...

What do you think about it?
#2
My buddy got a Tremol-no on his Washburn Culprit and that thing works like a charm. If you really want to be able to lock it and unlock it nicely, it's a wonderful accessory.
#3
Yep, that's just what you need. There are also brands that do the same thing and might be cheaper but I can't remember any right now.

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#4
I found it a bit fiddly. admittedly I'm a bit cack-handed when it comes to anything mechanical, so bear that in mind.

Also bear in mind that big shifts in tuning will feel weird with the same gauge of string- down to drop D shouldn't be a problem, but drop C might be (especially if you're already using fairly light strings when you're tuned to E).

Other thing is, if you keep your trem dive-only, you might be able to get away with a d-tuna. that won't help for drop C, but it will for E to drop D.
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#5
Quote by Dave_Mc
I found it a bit fiddly. admittedly I'm a bit cack-handed when it comes to anything mechanical, so bear that in mind.

Also bear in mind that big shifts in tuning will feel weird with the same gauge of string- down to drop D shouldn't be a problem, but drop C might be (especially if you're already using fairly light strings when you're tuned to E).

Other thing is, if you keep your trem dive-only, you might be able to get away with a d-tuna. that won't help for drop C, but it will for E to drop D.

Oh ok, damn I wanted to drop to c, but i'll think ill need to get another guitar :/

If I install the tremol-no will i be able to change tunings from the headstock withouth touching bridge setups and stuff?

Thanks!
#6
Quote by DBKGUITAR
Oh ok, damn I wanted to drop to c, but i'll think ill need to get another guitar :/

If I install the tremol-no will i be able to change tunings from the headstock withouth touching bridge setups and stuff?

Thanks!


I used to have one. Generally tuning down from where you set it up works just fine. Tuning up from where you set it up tends to cause a bit more problems. You would only be able to do dive-only if you tuned down. You would not be able to do anything with the trem if you tuned up.

What is your end goal? Do you want the guitar to function as a fixed bridge; or do you want to use the trem in different tunings?
#7
I think it's kind of a ridiculous accessory. Why bother paying extra and spending the extra time on a Floyd Rose if you're just going to block it?

I think it's a wiser choice to just invest in another guitar for alternate tunings. Maybe something with a fixed bridge, or at least a non locking tremolo.
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#8
Quote by Offworld92
I think it's kind of a ridiculous accessory. Why bother paying extra and spending the extra time on a Floyd Rose if you're just going to block it?

I think it's a wiser choice to just invest in another guitar for alternate tunings. Maybe something with a fixed bridge, or at least a non locking tremolo.

Because the guitar i got was a gift and I'd be an asshole returning it just for having a floyd rose as it is a beautiful and awesome guitar :/

It's 73€ here were I live so its kinda cheap ^^

Quote by TJHague
I used to have one. Generally tuning down from where you set it up works just fine. Tuning up from where you set it up tends to cause a bit more problems. You would only be able to do dive-only if you tuned down. You would not be able to do anything with the trem if you tuned up.

What is your end goal? Do you want the guitar to function as a fixed bridge; or do you want to use the trem in different tunings?

I'd like to switch to drop c or d from time time like I would in a fixed bridge guitar, because I play some songs that require it hehe
#9
Quote by DBKGUITAR
Oh ok, damn I wanted to drop to c, but i'll think ill need to get another guitar :/

If I install the tremol-no will i be able to change tunings from the headstock withouth touching bridge setups and stuff?

Thanks!


You'll be able to do drop C, just if you have strings which feel "right" in E they'll be pretty floppy in drop C. Or if you change a lot you could go with a compromise gauge, but then they'll never really feel completely right for anything.

You will be able to, yeah, as long as you engage the blocking mechanism on the tremol-no first. But you'll not be able to use the tremolo in full-floating mode in the different tuning, just dive only (or blocked).

Quote by Offworld92
I think it's kind of a ridiculous accessory. Why bother paying extra and spending the extra time on a Floyd Rose if you're just going to block it?

I think it's a wiser choice to just invest in another guitar for alternate tunings. Maybe something with a fixed bridge, or at least a non locking tremolo.


Nah I can sort of understand it, to be fair (heck I got one ). You can block and unblock on the fly (at least you can if you leave the back plate off). You can't do that if you block it the old-fashioned way, and obviously with a non-trem guitar you can't use a trem at all. Say you have a song which has a lot of unison bends or something like that. They're a pain with a floating floyd.

Only problem, as I said, is it's a bit fiddly. Plus once you actually think about it it's maybe less useful than you'd originally think- you also have the string gauge problems if you want to change tunings a lot to wildly different tunings. Granted you have that with a hardtail guitar, too, but yeah.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#10
Quote by Dave_Mc
You'll be able to do drop C, just if you have strings which feel "right" in E they'll be pretty floppy in drop C. Or if you change a lot you could go with a compromise gauge, but then they'll never really feel completely right for anything.

You will be able to, yeah, as long as you engage the blocking mechanism on the tremol-no first. But you'll not be able to use the tremolo in full-floating mode in the different tuning, just dive only (or blocked).


Nah I can sort of understand it, to be fair (heck I got one ). You can block and unblock on the fly (at least you can if you leave the back plate off). You can't do that if you block it the old-fashioned way, and obviously with a non-trem guitar you can't use a trem at all. Say you have a song which has a lot of unison bends or something like that. They're a pain with a floating floyd.

Only problem, as I said, is it's a bit fiddly. Plus once you actually think about it it's maybe less useful than you'd originally think- you also have the string gauge problems if you want to change tunings a lot to wildly different tunings. Granted you have that with a hardtail guitar, too, but yeah.


Oh ok I see... but the string problem think happens also with fixed bridge guitars right?
#11
yeah it will do.

fixed bridge just means you have less faffing about to do balancing the tremolo etc. when you change to different tunings. with a fixed bridge you can tune down to a lower tuning in maybe 30 seconds and if the strings are too slack go back again to the original tuning inside another 30 seconds. whereas with a floating floyd you have to balance the trem both those times which is annoying. I'm sure really experienced guitar tech types could do even that fairly quickly, but it's still a longer, more involved job.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#12
I had one in my Ibanez PGM a few years ago and found it to be fairly worthless. Even with the bolts tightened down super tight, the tuning would still get pretty wonky. I ended up just taking it off and selling it. Didn't do what I wanted it to and I'll never buy one again. Just put a piece of wood in front of your trem and make it dive-only. Cheaper, and way more effective
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#13
Another guitar is always the answer. ALWAYS.
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#15
I own 11 ibanez rg guitars all with floyds, and if any of them did not have the WD tremolo stabilizer, i would sell them. Its just something that goes inside the spring. It takes a floating trem and turns it into something else. Let me explain. While the tremel no basically takes the floyd and renders it useless, the WD stabilizer rests inside a spring, so when you dive and let go, it will shoot back to 'zero'. BUT! When you pull up on the bar and let go, it flys back to zero! It requires no mods to the instrument, and keeps the bridge in place no matter what! I was skeptical when the part came in the mail, cause i just saw a little plastic tube with threads. But when i installed it, holy ****in moli! It basically wedges between the spring claw and the block of the trem. When u dive, the spring stretches, and it lets go of the block. When you pull up, the spring claw turns into a psuedo hinge on one of the two adjustment screws. So instead of the two screws adjusting the spring tension, which is the pain in the ass with all floyds for tuning/string guage changes, it makes one screw 'bridge level adjust' and the other screw spring tension. You will be able to bend strings without the others going flat, will allow you to play hard as **** without flutter or any note fluctuation, and will allow you to tune the finetuner to a drop tuning with maximum range. If you break a string, the others stay in tune as well. Take 30 bucks and order one. The WD tremolo will have you scratching your head when you see it, but once is installed and you adjust the bridge level screw and the spring tension screws to be equal between pulling up and pushing down, you will finally have complete love for your floyd rose. Without this product, i would have done what paul gilbert did and say naaaah. Fixed bridge it is. If you remove the bar completely, you would swear the trem is blocked. But jokes on everyone who has given up and got the tremelno. I still ha e all the up and down range of the floyd, and the stability of the fixed bridge. Its truely mind blowing how that damn thing has changed my life. I dont work at WD but i wish i did. I could probably make a youtube video to show how it works. Since the first one i bought, i ha e made my own from household stuff... Golf tees, allen wrenches, sock needles, anything that goes inside the spring and is strong will do. Dont do the tremelno. Do the WD tremolo stabilizer. Its fuggun sweet.
#16
Quote by coldandhomeless
I own 11 ibanez rg guitars all with floyds, and if any of them did not have the WD tremolo stabilizer, i would sell them. Its just something that goes inside the spring. It takes a floating trem and turns it into something else. Let me explain. While the tremel no basically takes the floyd and renders it useless, the WD stabilizer rests inside a spring, so when you dive and let go, it will shoot back to 'zero'. BUT! When you pull up on the bar and let go, it flys back to zero! It requires no mods to the instrument, and keeps the bridge in place no matter what! I was skeptical when the part came in the mail, cause i just saw a little plastic tube with threads. But when i installed it, holy ****in moli! It basically wedges between the spring claw and the block of the trem. When u dive, the spring stretches, and it lets go of the block. When you pull up, the spring claw turns into a psuedo hinge on one of the two adjustment screws. So instead of the two screws adjusting the spring tension, which is the pain in the ass with all floyds for tuning/string guage changes, it makes one screw 'bridge level adjust' and the other screw spring tension. You will be able to bend strings without the others going flat, will allow you to play hard as **** without flutter or any note fluctuation, and will allow you to tune the finetuner to a drop tuning with maximum range. If you break a string, the others stay in tune as well. Take 30 bucks and order one. The WD tremolo will have you scratching your head when you see it, but once is installed and you adjust the bridge level screw and the spring tension screws to be equal between pulling up and pushing down, you will finally have complete love for your floyd rose. Without this product, i would have done what paul gilbert did and say naaaah. Fixed bridge it is. If you remove the bar completely, you would swear the trem is blocked. But jokes on everyone who has given up and got the tremelno. I still ha e all the up and down range of the floyd, and the stability of the fixed bridge. Its truely mind blowing how that damn thing has changed my life. I dont work at WD but i wish i did. I could probably make a youtube video to show how it works. Since the first one i bought, i ha e made my own from household stuff... Golf tees, allen wrenches, sock needles, anything that goes inside the spring and is strong will do. Dont do the tremelno. Do the WD tremolo stabilizer. Its fuggun sweet.

interesting! Please make a video