#1
First of all, I have a Floyd Rose, and as you know, it's a pain the ass to change tunings each time...
So ym question is that if i have a drop d song or a drop c song, can i still be able to play it with standart tuning?

I can't wait for my tremol-no!!
#2
Sometimes it is possible to pull it off easily, other times it is difficult, occasionally it will be impossible. You just have to play everything except the low E string 2 frets higher than usual. It depends on the song as to whether or not that is physically possible to do. You won't be able to play along to the song though, since you'll be playing everything higher.
#3
The song or the specific guitar part? You can play other versions of the same chords, but you might not be able to play the exact part if the fingerings just don't work. Melodies should be doable in either tuning. Totally depends on the song.

For stuff with a dropped low string, you can just find the equivalent root in standard tuning. It'll be an octave higher, but it's the same chord.
Last edited by cdgraves at Feb 2, 2014,
#4
Quote by cdgraves
The song or the specific guitar part? You can play other versions of the same chords, but you might not be able to play the exact part if the fingerings just don't work. Melodies should be doable in either tuning. Totally depends on the song.

For stuff with a dropped low string, you can just find the equivalent root in standard tuning. It'll be an octave higher, but it's the same chord.

For example

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-xF2MAFw5s
#5
It depends whether:

1. The song has a note lower than the low E in standard; and

2. You want that lower note to be the same (same octave) as the recording.

If so, then you cannot use E standard.
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#6
Quote by DBKGUITAR
I can't wait for my tremol-no!!

A tremol-no really isn't as great as people think. Anyway...

Yes, you can. You'll have to learn the art of transposing though. What this means is, moving it from one key to another. It should be easy enough, really.

Edit:
Of course, this isn't really playing the song as it was written; it's just changing the key so that you don't have worry about the notes below E and such.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Feb 2, 2014,
#7
Playing in the same octave might not be possible for a lot of songs, as a lot of times when people tune down they make heavy use of open strings. But you can totally play different voicings of chords.
#8
Playing drop c songs in drop d for example isn't a huge difference, you can still follow the tabs but it'll be one tone higher. Playing drop tuned songs in a standard tuning is a little different though, you'll have to transpose on the low e string.
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#9
You can transpose songs in drop D and drop C to be able to play them in standard tuning, but it can be a huge pain, especially if the song makes use of open string notes. So something like Laid to Rest by Lamb of God wouldn't be too hard (just transpose everything except for the low E string up 2 frets), but Always & Never by Coheed and Cambria would be a harder to adjust for.

Also keep in mind that playing songs this way won't sound "right" as they're in a different key now and as a result you won't be able to play along with the song.
#11
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
A tremol-no really isn't as great as people think. Anyway...

Yes, you can. You'll have to learn the art of transposing though. What this means is, moving it from one key to another. It should be easy enough, really.

Edit:
Of course, this isn't really playing the song as it was written; it's just changing the key so that you don't have worry about the notes below E and such.

why it isn't that great?
#12
Quote by DBKGUITAR
why it isn't that great?

Because you really don't need it. If you set up your floyd rose properly, you can do anything that a tremel-no can do -- without paying $50.
#13
You don't need to change the tuning, unless you are using the song as a backing track. You can play songs in standard tuning with exactly the same fingerings. They will just sound higher than the original song. But does it matter if you don't use a backing track?

If you use a backing track, you need to transpose. Some songs are meant to be played with certain fingerings and are hard to play with other fingerings. Some songs work well with any fignerings.

So if the song you are playing is in D standard tuning and you want to play it in standard tuning, you just need to play 2 frets lower.

But what I do is I don't care about the original tuning. I just play with the same fingerings but in standard tuning. Yes, the pitch is a bit different but who cares? I don't usually use backing tracks. For example many Van Halen songs are in Eb standard tuning but I play them with the same fingerings but in standard tuning.
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#14
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
A tremol-no really isn't as great as people think. Anyway...

Yes, you can. You'll have to learn the art of transposing though. What this means is, moving it from one key to another. It should be easy enough, really.

Edit:
Of course, this isn't really playing the song as it was written; it's just changing the key so that you don't have worry about the notes below E and such.


This, but I wouldn't go as far as saying the art of transposing is easy. The more complex the song the more it's gonna suck to transpose it and actually play it. Depending on the original tuning of the song, it can throw a real monkey wrench into how the song is actually played.