#1
So, i'm putting together a tab because the one i'm using from this site isn't 100% correct, but i'm having trouble with the name of a chord that is used in the song. I have iphone apps and have used some websites but nowhere seems to have these chords labelled.

Basically, in the song there is an intro that goes Em, Am, G, B(7th fret) and then plays the same shape as B(7th fret) twice again but moves down two frets each time.

Do those last two chords that are played have a particular name? Because if they do i don't know of it and can't find it...

There's also a chord played in the chorus where 2nd fret is barred, and D, G and B of 4th are also pressed down. It's basically the version of C that usually goes on 3rd fret but knocked down a fret. Is that just another version of C or does that have it's own name too?

Sorry, but i'm a bit of a noob and am still learning chords :P
I'm not insane, i'm not insane.
#2
Okay, the second chord i asked about, in the chorus, i've just realised is a standard B. So ignored that bit :P
I'm not insane, i'm not insane.
#3
No, the chord is nameless. Scientists estimate only 20% of all living chords have been identified and named. You should take a picture of it and email it to a Musicologist at your local university.
#5
Oh wow you need to learn the chromatic scale, it's easy - kind of like the alphabet, but only A-G which you already know plus some semi tones. It's totally essential and you should have learned it before barre chords

So your B barre 799877, moves down two frets gives you an A (577655), then 2 more is a G (355433). It's the major barre chord shape and you can make any major chord you want. There are tons of ways to make chords, the open chords are just the most common ones, Em, Am, G, C whatever is all over the place not just in one spot. It's often misleading because beginners learn "This is the C chord" (x32010), but the truth is there's a whole bunch of C chords on a guitar.
#6
Quote by fanapathy
So your B barre 799877, moves down two frets gives you an A (577655), then 2 more is a G (355433).

^

If you know a little bit about intervals and chord construction, and then look at what you're actually playing as you move down the frets, you will see why this is so.

7 root (octave)
7 perfect fifth (octave)
8 major third
9 root (octave)
9 perfect fifth
7 root

As you move down, since you're playing the same thing essentially, except starting on a different root note, the intervals (which determines what type of chord you're actually playing, but not exactly which chord you're playing) don't change, which means you're still playing major chords in their barred form as you're moving down the frets:

5 root (octave)
5 perfect fifth (octave)
6 major third
7 root (octave)
7 perfect fifth
5 root

Notice how the intervals between the notes remain exactly the same even though you're playing on a different fret.

Therefore, as a shortcut, in cases like this, I like to just look at the root note and to be able to identify what chord I'm playing. As said before, you're playing the following:

B - A - G

Here's a short lesson on intervals if you're not sure what I'm talking about: http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/31
Last edited by triface at Feb 3, 2014,
#7
Okay, thank you fanapathy!

See, i knew there were more than one version of a chord, i just hadn't come across these particular two before... I have an iphone app which lists all the versions of each chord but couldn't seem to find these two. I must've just not looked properly.

But yeah, i'm still technically new to guitar, i've just been learning songs, and finding new techniques in songs, rather than learning the theory of guitar playing before hand. I guess that's just how it goes when you're learning by yourself, rather than being taught.

I think i've just been a bit stupid and maybe slightly ignorant here. But it's no bother, i'll get the hang of it eventually :P
I'm not insane, i'm not insane.
#8
Fanpathy is indeed correct, virtually any shape creates a chord in theory as averred by Triface. e.g. all strings played open = Em 11 no 9th. i use Chord Dictionary on my IMAC, it is pretty useful for naming rather unorthodox chord shapes.
#9
Quote by cdgraves
No, the chord is nameless. Scientists estimate only 20% of all living chords have been identified and named. You should take a picture of it and email it to a Musicologist at your local university.