#1
Hey lads

I'm building a guitar later in the year and I just wanted to get some advice on finishing.

It's going to be a maple neck sonic/surf/daphne blue (haven't decided yet) strat.

What I want to know is how to get that super bright and smooth finish that fender gets.
Can I achieve it with just a spray can or will I need a compressor/spray gun? What sort of clear would I use? I want it to be as 'vintage' spec as possible so would I be using a thinner clear?
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#2
You can get professional results with rattle cans but it is a lot of work. I've had great results with Krylon spray paint and Rustoleum primer and polyurethane lacquer. Re-ranch sells nitro lacquer in spray cans.
#4
Quote by Invader Jim
You can get professional results with rattle cans but it is a lot of work. I've had great results with Krylon spray paint and Rustoleum primer and polyurethane lacquer. Re-ranch sells nitro lacquer in spray cans.

Surprisingly we have Rustoleum in Australia First for everything!

I've found some paint that's pretty close to Daphne blue etc from an online graffiti store. Looks pretty decent quality (german made etc) and not too badly priced.

How many cans do you think I'd need for one body?

^ Damn.

I have seen some pretty pro finishes with cans so I guess I'll go that route. I'm no stranger to hard work . I can't afford to pay someone else to do it (last quote I got was $460...).
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#5
It's been a while since I painted a guitar but I seem to remember using 3-4 cans of paint and 2-3 cans of poly. Nitro requires a whole lot more coats.

You'll have to let the lacquer cure before you can install hardware or even set it down on anything or else you'll get indentions in the lacquer. Poly can take several weeks or months to fully cure.
Last edited by Invader Jim at Feb 5, 2014,
#6
Alright cool.

That's no worries either; I've got a massive shed so I was going to set up a spray booth in one of the corners. It's really hot weather at the moment (35-43*C) ,,, is that bad for painting?
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#7
That's pretty warm

How's the humidity? Hot weather doesn't help but if it is humid then you'll want to wait until it subsides. I've had terrible luck trying to paint in high humidity, even in relatively cool temps (65-70*F or 18-21*C for you). High humidity gives you loyal of orange peel and cloudiness. Since it's so friggin hot you may want to wait for a cooler day.
Last edited by Invader Jim at Feb 5, 2014,
#8
Nah it's extremely dry heat where I am. Usually 0-10% humidity.

I won't be building the thing until April but they think this Summer will be a loooong one. I think it should be manageable then.

Alrighty. Cheers for the help lads

Will be a build thread in April so keep your eyes peeled
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#9
Ah, ok then. Round here the dewpoint almost never drops out of the mid-60s in the spring and summer. Summer usually gives us dewpoints in the 80s and above so it's insanely muggy and miserable.
#10
Eugh. Nothing worse than humidity. I've got asthma too so it just makes that 10x worse.
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#11
I wont say I'm overly happy with my experience, but using wal-mart paint is probably a part of that. I used 1 can of primer (i sanded down to wood), 2 cans per color, and 2 cans of a clear coat (i have used rustoleum, and the blue cans that i assume are wal-mart brand). I actually just screwed a hook in my celing for a drying area, and hung a coat hanger on a tree branch for my painting area.

Rattle cans are a viable option for painting guitars (its all I've ever used), but to get certain colors, you probably want to go to some websites that will actually mix colors for you, and put them in cans, and i think there are some home improvement stores that will do the same, but idk on the price.
Gear:

Guitars:
BC Rich Warlock
Dean 88
ME682-In Progress
Amps:
Carvin SX300
Etc:
Clayton 1.0mm picks
Planet Waves cables.
#13
I totes agree, thats why i used it once, and never again :P
Gear:

Guitars:
BC Rich Warlock
Dean 88
ME682-In Progress
Amps:
Carvin SX300
Etc:
Clayton 1.0mm picks
Planet Waves cables.