#1
Can someone please tell me what's really needed to record professional sounding music on a budget. I don't want to get ripped off by companies who only want to make a profit. I know I'll need a quality mic, studio headphones, an audio software and monitors but what else is needed? Please be specific. Thanks!
#2
A room with good acoustics is much more important than any gear you're going to buy. If you truly want to get a professional sound, you're going to have to treat your room in some way, thankfully - if you're fine going the DIY route (which I assume you are, since your name is DIYNow...), you can treat a fairly good sized room for ~$300. It won't be perfect (rectangular rooms, which I'm assuming you're in are far from perfect), but it'll definitely be much better than not having it.

First, we need to know - What is your budget?
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#3
Crazy as it seems, I'm thinking between $1,000 - $1,500 Max. Less would be ideal for me though! I'm broke :-) lol
#4
I'm assuming you don't have any recording gear yet? What about the equipment (amps/guitars/etc.) you'll be recording?

What exactly are you wanting to do/how many inputs will you need (ie: record acoustic guitar and vocals, record electric guitar, record a full drum set, etc.)? What are the dimensions of your room(s) (length, width and height - a diagram might help, especially if it's not completely rectangular)? Do you need sound isolation? Are you planning to record other bands, or just yourself?
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#5
Keep in mind that you get what you pay for. You won't be getting "professional sounding music" with a $50 mic, $30 headphones and a Guitar Link. You'll also need to put time into learning what each effect does, what each knob on each effect does, and honing your ears, which can equate to money too.

If you're concerned about getting ripped off, look for local, independent producers. I'm sure they'd love your business.
#6
Quote by Cavalcade
Keep in mind that you get what you pay for. You won't be getting "professional sounding music" with a $50 mic, $30 headphones and a Guitar Link. You'll also need to put time into learning what each effect does, what each knob on each effect does, and honing your ears, which can equate to money too.

If you're concerned about getting ripped off, look for local, independent producers. I'm sure they'd love your business.


This.

You will not make a professional sounding recording with $1500 worth of gear.

Unless....
- you are just doing an electronic or hip-hop project (or something else that has minimal demands for mics and preamps)
- you are willing to invest a couple of years - say five or so (if you practice for a certain number of hours a day) - to get good enough to make entry-level or intermediate gear sound great
- already really know what you're doing (which you obviously don't)

What I would do is check into a studio who maybe has a reputation, or whose work really stands on its own for what they can do. Even a pro studio at $100/hr will be able to book you in for 10-15 hours. Depending on what you want to record, that could well be enough, and you'll have a truly professional product.

Better, for your budget, would be to check into a project studio that has the facility to accommodate your needs, and who also has a track record of solid recordings. You can probably check into one of those for a couple hundred dollars for a day.

In either case, they'll have the mics, preamps, know-how, etc., leaving you only to have to worry about the music.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by DIYNow
Can someone please tell me what's really needed to record professional sounding music on a budget. I don't want to get ripped off by companies who only want to make a profit. I know I'll need a quality mic, studio headphones, an audio software and monitors but what else is needed? Please be specific. Thanks!


Let's start with this (remember, you said "professional" - not just good)

Microphone: many so-called professional microphones are already well beyond your total budget. However, a few to consider that are still considered "pro" mics:

Shure SM7 - $400
Rode K2 - $700
AKG C414 - $1000
AT 4050 $700 (the 4060 is twice that...)

Skip the studio headphones. Just get a pair of cheapies. For tracking, it doesn't matter anyways.

Software - Reaper = $60 (you can spend a whole lot more, but trying to give you pro-level stuff while respecting your budget)

Monitors:

Yamaha HS8 - $700/pr (other options but this represents the best bang for the buck, while still carrying a "pro"-ish range)

Now, we've already spent your budget. We haven't treated your room ($200-300 for DIY stuff you make yourself), bought an interface (maybe $800? can certainly go way higher), any other mics, no cables, stands, etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
What kind of treatment would be best on DIY? What stuff would you need to buy? I'm moving in to a new place soon and I want to start recording there and am going to be micing my amp so I'm also interested
#9
Here is a link to a photo album I created that shows how I made mine. I got the basic idea from the johnlsayers.com forum, which is probably the best place on the net for studio construction and acoustics.

Be sure to read the captions I have added to the photos, as they give some useful details.

https://plus.google.com/photos/105151472351939734946/albums/5666851243565868161?authkey=CMqj8aqgrZKZDQ

The semi-rigid fiberglass is usually Owens-Corning 703 - NOT Roxul Safe and Sound or anything like that. I used a slightly different product (well, basically the same, except not from Owens Corning) from a producer/supplier in Canada, as the OC stuff was impossible to find even semi-locally.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Feb 5, 2014,
#10
It depends so much based on what kind of stuff you want to record that it's hard to give good advice.

For example, if you want to record tight, big, crisp metal drums you'll need way more preamps/microphones than if you are just doing acoustic guitar and vocal stuff.
RIP Gooze

cats
#11
You won't get "professional" sounding on $1500.

For something half decent, some decent headphones, a audio interface (M-Audio Fast Track or something), and SM58 and a guitar should do. Then Reaper.
Basically all you need to get started.