#1
any of you undergone CBT? if so, for what? howd it go

discuss
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#5
It depends what it is being used to treat, what methods within CBT the therapist is using and if the person receiving the therapy puts their trust and energy into it. All these factors contribute to whether CBT works well for you or not.
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Last edited by freighttrain at Feb 4, 2014,
#6
Quote by freighttrain
It depends what it is being used to treat, what methods within CBT the therapist is using and if the person receiving the therapy puts their trust and energy into it. All these factors contribute to whether CBT works well for you or not.


don't forget that the therapist should possibly not be an idiot..

I'd say that even if all these things apply there's still a BIG difference between cases as to how successful the therapy will be
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#7
It's pretty great if you get a therapist you're comfortable with.
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#8
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#9
I learnt CBT for depression from the book that popularized it: Feeling Good The New Mood Therapy. That paired with guided meditation helped me tremendously. It was a process; not something that simply flips a switch. You definitely need to be committed to the process for it to help you.
#10
I had it for three years, I'm so glad I went through it! It defiantly changed my life, it was tough and challenging to say the least
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#12
No I'm normal
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#14
Did some for depression and panic disorder for a year or two but didn't notice much of an improvement. Meds had moderate effect of depression, but Xanax works wonders for panic attacks. I'm actually looking for something new for depression because it isn't very controlled with sertraline and the side effects suck.
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#16
I had some and it worked a treat. I hate that sort of thing and didn't go into it with high hopes but actually I still use some of the strategies she taught me when I can feel myself spiralling.
#17
I have had it.

It's something a lot of people naturally do anyway.

For those uninformed..

It's when you say to yourself: "I'm sure he's alright" (good) or "I'm going to fail this test so hard!" (Bad).

It is used for people who heavily keep hanging in the "bad" thoughts, and you learn to asses and turn bad into good.

That being said, it is hard for some people to use it, because some are "too smart" and creatively make up new cognitions on how bad things can go, and dispute the (good) counter thoughts.

Well smart or paranoid, there really is no black and white answer there.

It indeed works more effective when you really hope for it.

This may sound like a pseudo effect, but it's really not. For some reason your mind needs to get rewarded by experiencing good outcome on a good premise.

If you experience good outcome on a bad premise your mind most likely find it "lucky" or disregard it as a small being totally overshadowed by the first next negative thing that occurs.

For people experiencing bad on a good premise... Well, this is the most common and people go about it as "better luck next time" or "this is not my thang".

Kind of odd how that seems to work, but train of thought has more power than actually something bad happening.


Tldr;

Premise wins over outcome.

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#19
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Good it was stupid for you. That tells me you are stable in your thoughts, however a lot of people are not.

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#20
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#21
I have BPD, I probably should mess around with that shit.

But for now, I'll just go with making my life so terrible that I need to change it.

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#23
I've done some. I'm diagnosed with schizoaffective (BPD's and schizophrenia's bastard child) and I've found it hasn't been particularly helpful.
#24
It helped compulsions a little, and helped swings similarly, but a lot of the changing-thinking methods don't work with me, so drugs. A lot of my mental problems are more biological anyway, so chemicals are the things to change.
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#25
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I've done some. I'm diagnosed with schizoaffective (BPD's and schizophrenia's bastard child) and I've found it hasn't been particularly helpful.


I also can hardly see it helping for schizophrenia tbh, that shit goes way beyond just a few negative cognitions

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#26
Quote by xxdarrenxx
I also can hardly see it helping for schizophrenia tbh, that shit goes way beyond just a few negative cognitions

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#27
It helps, but disorders like schizophrenia are primarily biologically driven.
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#28
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE


That's interesting.

There's a diminishing return on proven facts, that half are disproven within x amount of years. Don't know the number but it was far less than one might think.

So half The stuff everyone including me says now, is counter argued or disproven anyway within a short time

Anyways will read up on it.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 6, 2014,
#29
Quote by xxdarrenxx
That's interesting.

There's a diminishing return on proven facts, that half are disproven within x amount of years. Don't know the number but it was far less than one might think.

So half The stuff everyone including me says now, is counter argued or disproven anyway within a short time

Anyways will read up on it.

It was only reviewed for its accuracy 16 months ago. I greatly doubt that it's outdated information.

And it's probably a good thing that you do actually read it before posting anything.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 6, 2014,
#30
It should be spelled cBt. The behavioural element needs emphasis.

I found it helpful, but I think if I put more effort into it that I'd get a lot more out of it.

I think the cognitive element is flawed in some ways as well. It's sometimes less useful to challenge irrational beliefs than to just notice them and encourage a sense of distance from those beliefs.

An analogy for those irrational beliefs might be talking to an extremist. You can engage with an extremist and attempt to reason with them, but the likeliest result isn't them acknowledging the irrationality of their beliefs, it's likeliest that you'll just end up deflated and irritated. Just humour those thoughts, and they'll trouble you less.

I do think that one problematic element of CBT is the supposition that all intrusive thoughts and anxiety are irrational, when there are plenty that make sense and ought to be listened to. Self-criticism is sometimes fairly useful, so long as it isn't absolutist or overwhelming.

Quote by xxdarrenxx
I also can hardly see it helping for schizophrenia tbh, that shit goes way beyond just a few negative cognitions


Schizophrenia is characterised by a number of distorted cognitive processes. It might not help schizophrenics stop hallucinating, but it can help them disengage from those hallucinations and paranoid delusions. If schizophrenia consisted solely of hallucinations and people could realise them as just hallucinations, it wouldn't be much of an illness. The problems are the responses to those hallucinations and being convinced by paranoid thoughts, and the inability to reality check.
Last edited by modus operandi at Feb 6, 2014,