#1
I'm wondering if gallops are ever picked up, down, up such as in ..
This riff from Six - All that remains

|--------------------------------------------|
|--------------------------------------------|
|--------------------------------------------|
|-------------------------------------7---9-|
|--------------------------------------------|
|-0-0-000-0-0-000-0-0-000-0---0----|

I've normally tried playing this down, down, down.up.down for the gallop.. etc. i've never been able to get this up to speed with out wearing out my arm instantly though so im wondering if guitar players would do this.. down, up , down.up.down, up, down, up.down.up.. etc up down up for the second gallop. Now is this an unorthodox way of playing? ive never heard of playing a gallop up,down,up before. should i just keep practicing it the way ive been doing.

hope this was understandable, thanks.
Last edited by 31andsunny at Feb 4, 2014,
#2
To expand on this there is another riff.. 11th hour - lamb of god
|---------------------------------------|
|---------------------------------------|
|---------------------------------------|
|---------------------------------------|
|-12-----13-12----------------------|
|---13-12-----13-0-000-0-0-0----|
Now i may be wrong but i believe if i was to stay true to alternate picking id do the gallop up,down,up no?
#3
The way I do gallops is the way you described, D D DUD D D DUD. I find it a lot easier than doing straight alternate picking (D U DUD U D UDU) it helps me to keep the beat on the downstrokes and be able to throw in an upstroke to form a gallop.

But if doing alternate picking for all of it is more comfortable for you, don't be discouraged, just use that as long as it's comfortable and you can keep time to a metronome well using that method.
#4
There is some people who can do alternate galloping, i have a friends that is able to do it.

The problem with alternate galloping is that the gallop feel often disappear cause you are not accenting the notes in the same way. The reason why we play down up down from the start is to get those 2 downstrokes in a row so get an accent on the beat.

As said, it can be done. But i would personally recommend just practicing normal galloping.
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#5
Should be practicing with D D DUD / D U DUD / U U UDU or any other way you can imagine.
Remember that do not only rely on downstroke on the beat.
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#6
Quote by 31andsunny
I've never been able to get this up to speed with out wearing out my arm instantly though


This is the real issue here. You can't do it because you're playing with motions that are too big and/or too much tension in your arm. Like Sickz I've seen gallops done the other way but looking for a different way of playing something isn't generally the first solution you should go to for things like this.
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#7
I'm afraid that if you want the riff to be accented properly and to maintain that heaviness then the D D DUD method is the way to go! It can be a pain on the arm at first but there are ways of dealing with that. Pick lightly, preferably with a heavy pick. Doing so will mean that you will conserve energy while maintaining consistent volume (plus you don't need a light pick flapping about for stuff like this). Also, be mindful of keeping your pick as close as possible to the strings at all time - the less surplus right hand movement the better!

Also, lots of Lamb of God riffs. They're tight as hell when it comes to galloping - As The Palaces Burn is a fantastic album to practice all this!
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#8
Now is this an unorthodox way of playing? ive never heard of playing a gallop up,down,up before. should i just keep practicing it the way ive been doing.


I would definitely suggest getting the "standard" gallop picking together first. The "standard" way leads to very consistent timekeeping and well defined accents, which is essential to getting it to sound good.

Sometimes it can be advantageous to deviate but I feel that you need to get the basics together first.

Small, relaxed motions, hit the string hard enough to get a clear note, focus on getting the timing perfect.