#1
Dear diary,



I decided it was time to let my Ibanez AS73L breathe again. The weather has been really dry until it rained early Saturday morning. I've only had "Cherry" for 2.5 years, and it was suggested to me that I let her acclimate and reset little by little when the tone "richens" or gets sweeter. I was reminded to turn the truss rod when the strings buzzed horribly. I got between 1/3 and 1/2 turn before it was quite bearable to slam on the strings. I was able to hide the dreaded G-string tuning issue at the nut...boy did it get worse with the added relief, or at least I can tell. Cutting a nut is still something I am not good at - I still tend to go too far. I do not have the balls to do it on this guitar. My Strats were easy when I put 11-60 on them, but the action is different. 11-52 jazz of course on this one just like my RG and LP.

Am I doing okay so far? Anybody else love Artcores?

I think I just fell in love again. Damn she sounds good, even playing metal. Still stock from the factory - I don't think I'll ever change the pickups.
#2
First of all, you don't just start cranking away on the truss rod without knowing why you are getting buzzing. It could be that the action is too low, you might have a high or low fret, or it might be too little relief. Your truss rod only addresses the relief, and the fact that the buzzing got worse when you turned the truss rod just proves my point. There are tons of websites that go through how to do a proper setup. It isn't hard, you just need to know what you're doing. So Google guitar setup and take the time to do it right.
#3
I so seldom tweak a truss rod on any guitar that it's just amazing to me the number of threads that talk about it. If your nut is cut properly and your frets are level and the neck is stable (and the weather hasn't done anything drastic and if you've kept your guitar properly humidified), you usually don't need to touch that thing.
#4
Quote by dspellman
I so seldom tweak a truss rod on any guitar that it's just amazing to me the number of threads that talk about it. If your nut is cut properly and your frets are level and the neck is stable (and the weather hasn't done anything drastic and if you've kept your guitar properly humidified), you usually don't need to touch that thing.



It seems a lot of people on this forum think the truss rod is some magic knob to fix anything, and whatever happens they start cranking away at it. You don't take your car to the mechanic when it isn't running well, and without even opening the hood he tells you what to do. No. You first have to diagnose the problem before you can fix it, otherwise it will probably make things worse. There are a lot of things that affect how a guitar plays... most interact with each other, and you can't fix it without knowing what is wrong.
#5
Quote by stormin1155
First of all, you don't just start cranking away on the truss rod without knowing why you are getting buzzing. It could be that the action is too low, you might have a high or low fret, or it might be too little relief. Your truss rod only addresses the relief, and the fact that the buzzing got worse when you turned the truss rod just proves my point. There are tons of websites that go through how to do a proper setup. It isn't hard, you just need to know what you're doing. So Google guitar setup and take the time to do it right.


First of all, the buzzing quit when I turned the rod - it was buzzing all the way down. That's why I even touched it - I have a few friends in the business, and a couple have given their suggestions since I first got this guitar. The action is better, frets are still level, space gauged within tolerance, intonation is dead-on (except the darn G), and I have seen some of the Youtube videos. Scott Grove is a hoot, isn't he? I will show it to my luthier friend to see if he can do something with the nut if it continues to bother me.

Counter-clockwise to add relief, right?

I work on cars too, that's how I come to have feeler gauges. I'm definitely better at working on cars. I've done many successful setups on solidbodies, but never semi-hollow, hollow, or acoustics. Floyds - real and licensed, and I think one was a fake. I'm mainly a lefty and I've had 2 guitars come back right-handed, so I learned to do the minor things myself.

This was the nail in the coffin, since everything else was good and it was just like the guys predicted. I had 2 hygrometers to keep track of humidity; they were both above 40% at the driest. I have been babying this one - haven't even polished her body yet (no swirl marks), always wear a clean shirt, no buckles, bought a suede strap, my dog only bounced his tennis ball off the fretboard ONCE, left the house in the SKB hard case twice...I think. I was a little worried about doing this, but will keep an eye or two on it if anything changes.

Anything "magical" I've missed? Oh, how do you get the knobs off? They're the $40 Ibanez grip knobs, and I don't think they have set screws under the rubber. I've tried the rag trick and I'm afraid if I pull any harder the wood will split. Whoever put them on was right-handed and the numbers don't line up!

Thanks for all the help!
Sent from the cleanest toilet in Hell