#1
Howdy, I'm new to guitar. I have a Ibanez Ag95 and Deluxe Players strat. I bought the strat as my first guitar on impulse but feel that i love the hollowbody more as it is the one that encourages me to play. Also, I have an AC30 with a bluesdriver pedal. Now that I'm set up, I'm not sure of what I like to play. I thought it was jazz, but I hate jazz chords. I love blues, but scales are tough and its a slow learning process, but I want to play NOW! So is it rock? I don't know, there's all different kinds.

I came across this video that shows the perfect style I want to play.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXuRpPXRBa4

At 3:07 into the video, I'm in heaven. He plays a great chord rhythm, then he loops it, and lays the perfect harmony on top of it. I love that style, but i have no idea what it is. Can someone help me understand what style this man is playing from 3:07 to 3:45. Those last two notes he hit just before it cuts out to a different segment are amazing. I want to make my guitar sing like that, but i dont know what hes playing. I also like the 5 minute mark to 5:34... that is also the sound I want to play.

Thanks for any help and guidance as I pave my way down this glorious road of music.
Last edited by MistaChy at Feb 7, 2014,
#2
^ sounds like blues to me.

But man, we can't really tell you the way you have to play.
Play what you like, what comes naturally y' know, you don't necessarily have to tell yourself "I'mma play jazz/metal/whatever now".
Name's Luca.

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#3
That is the blues right there my man, more specifically the kind of blues that came into existence with Jimi Hendrix and beyond.

I always advocate learning real music when learning how to play, so i am going to support you with a long list here of players that have that kind of style and you'll have to dig through and see what you like. The best way to learn (in my opinion) is to copy the ones that are already playing well, so learning from records you love and such.

Anyway, players you might want to check out include: Tony Spinner, Bernard Allison, Albert Cummings, Mike Zito, Julian Sas, Nils Lofgren, Reef, Gov't Mule, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Shannon Curfman, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Two Ton Shoe, Bryce Janey, Popa Chubby, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Robben Ford, Tab Benoit, Chris Duarte, Jonny Lang, Tommy Castro, Joe Bonamassa, Robert Cray, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Johnson and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

As said though, you might have to do some digging. For example Stevie ray vaughan have a lot of stuff that are straight up blues and not that kind of style in the video, but then he has songs like "Lenny", "Little Wing" (Jimi Hendrix tune) and "Riviera Paradise".

Same with a lot of guys on that list. Robert Cray have a lot of tunes you'd probably like the guitarwork on, like "Lotta Lovin'" and "Times Makes Two". It requires some digging, but if you do it you will probably strike at gold.

As spambot said though, we are not here to tell you what to play. But we are here to help. I hope some of these suggestions are somewhat what you were looking for. If you have any other questions, go right ahead and ask.

Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#4
Quote by Sickz
That is the blues right there my man, more specifically the kind of blues that came into existence with Jimi Hendrix and beyond.

I always advocate learning real music when learning how to play, so i am going to support you with a long list here of players that have that kind of style and you'll have to dig through and see what you like. The best way to learn (in my opinion) is to copy the ones that are already playing well, so learning from records you love and such.

Anyway, players you might want to check out include: Tony Spinner, Bernard Allison, Albert Cummings, Mike Zito, Julian Sas, Nils Lofgren, Reef, Gov't Mule, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Shannon Curfman, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Two Ton Shoe, Bryce Janey, Popa Chubby, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Robben Ford, Tab Benoit, Chris Duarte, Jonny Lang, Tommy Castro, Joe Bonamassa, Robert Cray, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Johnson and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

As said though, you might have to do some digging. For example Stevie ray vaughan have a lot of stuff that are straight up blues and not that kind of style in the video, but then he has songs like "Lenny", "Little Wing" (Jimi Hendrix tune) and "Riviera Paradise".

Same with a lot of guys on that list. Robert Cray have a lot of tunes you'd probably like the guitarwork on, like "Lotta Lovin'" and "Times Makes Two". It requires some digging, but if you do it you will probably strike at gold.

As spambot said though, we are not here to tell you what to play. But we are here to help. I hope some of these suggestions are somewhat what you were looking for. If you have any other questions, go right ahead and ask.

Best Regards
Sickz



Thanks for the indepth response. You have certainly pointed me in the right direction as with before I was direction less. Thanks agin
#5
Quote by Sickz
That is the blues right there my man, more specifically the kind of blues that came into existence with Jimi Hendrix and beyond.

I always advocate learning real music when learning how to play, so i am going to support you with a long list here of players that have that kind of style and you'll have to dig through and see what you like. The best way to learn (in my opinion) is to copy the ones that are already playing well, so learning from records you love and such.

Anyway, players you might want to check out include: Tony Spinner, Bernard Allison, Albert Cummings, Mike Zito, Julian Sas, Nils Lofgren, Reef, Gov't Mule, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Shannon Curfman, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Two Ton Shoe, Bryce Janey, Popa Chubby, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Robben Ford, Tab Benoit, Chris Duarte, Jonny Lang, Tommy Castro, Joe Bonamassa, Robert Cray, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Johnson and Stevie Ray Vaughan.

As said though, you might have to do some digging. For example Stevie ray vaughan have a lot of stuff that are straight up blues and not that kind of style in the video, but then he has songs like "Lenny", "Little Wing" (Jimi Hendrix tune) and "Riviera Paradise".

Same with a lot of guys on that list. Robert Cray have a lot of tunes you'd probably like the guitarwork on, like "Lotta Lovin'" and "Times Makes Two". It requires some digging, but if you do it you will probably strike at gold.

As spambot said though, we are not here to tell you what to play. But we are here to help. I hope some of these suggestions are somewhat what you were looking for. If you have any other questions, go right ahead and ask.

Best Regards
Sickz

QFT

From the 5 minute mark: Definite Hendrix style. Learn to do "double stops".
Last edited by dogmax at Feb 7, 2014,
#6
The best way to learn how to play in a certain style is to learn songs in that style. But you can't just say, "Ok. I'm going to memorize 'Little Wing' by Jimi Hendrix". You have to analyze what's going on. Learn WHY "Little Wing" works the way it works. So, for example, examine the harmony and chords. Hendrix was great at making (what could have easily been) boring chord progressions interesting.

For example, the basic chord progression for the verse of the song is:
Eminor, G, Aminor, Eminor, Bminor, Aminor, Cmajor, Gmajor, Fmajor, Cmajor, Dmajor.

But he doesn't just strum out the chords. He spices things up a bit. Here's the song, so you can tell what I mean:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8Xq0Y0dR-Q

Highlights off the top of my head:
  • The use of melody over chords similar to how you described.
  • Notice how, whenever he plays the Dmajor chord at the end of the verse, he lets it get quite. This naturally pushes towards the next verse or the chorus.
  • Hendrix always used double stops or "color notes" to spice up his rhythm playing. It's all over this particular song.


Fyi, Hendrix generally tuned to Eb standard. But you can play it in E standard, if you wish.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Feb 7, 2014,
#7
Quote by MistaChy
Howdy, I'm new to guitar. I have a Ibanez Ag95 and Deluxe Players strat. I bought the strat as my first guitar on impulse but feel that i love the hollowbody more as it is the one that encourages me to play. Also, I have an AC30 with a bluesdriver pedal. Now that I'm set up, I'm not sure of what I like to play. I thought it was jazz, but I hate jazz chords. I love blues, but scales are tough and its a slow learning process, but I want to play NOW! So is it rock? I don't know, there's all different kinds.

I came across this video that shows the perfect style I want to play.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXuRpPXRBa4

At 3:07 into the video, I'm in heaven. He plays a great chord rhythm, then he loops it, and lays the perfect harmony on top of it. I love that style, but i have no idea what it is. Can someone help me understand what style this man is playing from 3:07 to 3:45. Those last two notes he hit just before it cuts out to a different segment are amazing. I want to make my guitar sing like that, but i dont know what hes playing. I also like the 5 minute mark to 5:34... that is also the sound I want to play.

Thanks for any help and guidance as I pave my way down this glorious road of music.


forgot about glory, that's a bad place to start. Just play a lot, listen a lot, learn your fundamentals, appreciate music at all levels, and allow yourself to develop your own style naturally.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 7, 2014,
#8
sounds like blues (or maybe blues rock) to me...
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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#9
You don't need to stick with just one genre. IMO that's just limiting. Play what you want to play. Not all rock inspires me and there are lots of other songs from other genres that inspire me.

But to me the video sounds like a bit jazzy bluesy rock.

The part at around 5 minutes is really Hendrix-like.
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#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine

But to me the video sounds like a bit jazzy bluesy rock.


Are you suggesting that he sign up at TGP?
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#11
Quote by MistaChy
I thought it was jazz, but I hate jazz chords.


why? have you played them? have you put any effort at all into studying them and learning how to use them? i hate to break it to you but a lot of what this guy is doing is influenced by jazz, although it isn't heavy on the jazz. that being said, if you can learn to play jazz, you can probably learn to play blues, funk, or anything else you need. studying jazz gives you a combination of a grounding of chord theory (and an excellent command of chords in general) as well as excellent technique -- a combination you really just don't find in any other style (except maybe classical). and 99 times out of 100, if you get this combination in any other style, it's influenced by jazz.

Quote by MistaChy
I love blues, but scales are tough and its a slow learning process, but I want to play NOW!


if you want to be able to play like this guy, a good bet is to ditch this attitude. you get out of something what you put into it. if you want to cut corners and get to the destination faster, you're going to miss a lot along the way and, ultimately, your playing will reflect that. that is to say, when you play, it will be evident to other musicians (and even some non-musicians) that you cut corners.

his style is mostly bluesy rock, honestly, which is not a difficult style to emulate and learn. the 3:07-3:45 section is a light funk groove with some blues licks thrown in -- funk is a bit of a tricky style to get ahold of. the first section and the one after the funk sections are very jazz-heavy.

the bottom line is you need to develop your musicianship, which requires a lot of work, study, and application. a lot of people come into music with the "i want to play now" attitude and they almost never stick with it long enough to be any good. if it were really that easy, everyone would be doing it. trust me on that one.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
The best way to learn how to play in a certain style is to learn songs in that style. But you can't just say, "Ok. I'm going to memorize 'Little Wing' by Jimi Hendrix". You have to analyze what's going on. Learn WHY "Little Wing" works the way it works. So, for example, examine the harmony and chords. Hendrix was great at making (what could have easily been) boring chord progressions interesting.

For example, the basic chord progression for the verse of the song is:
Eminor, G, Aminor, Eminor, Bminor, Aminor, Cmajor, Gmajor, Fmajor, Cmajor, Dmajor.

But he doesn't just strum out the chords. He spices things up a bit. Here's the song, so you can tell what I mean:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8Xq0Y0dR-Q

Highlights off the top of my head:
  • The use of melody over chords similar to how you described.
  • Notice how, whenever he plays the Dmajor chord at the end of the verse, he lets it get quite. This naturally pushes towards the next verse or the chorus.
  • Hendrix always used double stops or "color notes" to spice up his rhythm playing. It's all over this particular song.


Fyi, Hendrix generally tuned to Eb standard. But you can play it in E standard, if you wish.



Can you please shed some light into standard Eb tuning?

Also, what do you mean that he used "color notes" and double stops?
#13
If you like that clip, you should definitely take the time to learn all your scales/keys, chords, and techniques. The first 5 minutes of that video are straight up funk and fusion, which are rooted in jazz harmony, so don't be afraid it. Learn to love those "jazz chords" - they are the juiciest, sweetest ones.

Based on this, you would probably really enjoy Umphreys McGee, Steely Dan, Chick Corea, The Jazz Pistols, and Herbie Hancock (to name a few). I really suggest giving all those guys a listen and exploring your musical tastes. Find something you connect with; music that makes you feel excited. You can always start learning stuff you don't understand yet, it'll just give you a bigger knowledge base when you get to learning the relevant concepts.

And don't think you need to choose a style. I make a point of being proficient in many styles (www.soundcloud.com/calvingraves listen to my samples dammit), as do most professional players.
Last edited by cdgraves at Feb 7, 2014,
#14
Quote by CS_Fugee
Can you please shed some light into standard Eb tuning?

Also, what do you mean that he used "color notes" and double stops?



Eb standard tuning: tuning the whole guitar down a half step. Usually for a specific reason like the singer's vocal range, or to alter the tension of the guitar strings.

color notes: notes not in the triad being played, but that contrast the harmony to give a stronger sense of melodic motion

double stops: playing two strings at the same time
#15
Quote by Dave_Mc
sounds like blues (or maybe blues rock) to me...


I don't know...I'd say it's more like blues with a smidgen of funk mixed in. Blues-funk fusion. Unusual because you normally see (or rather hear!) jazz fused with funk. Sounds good anyway whatever it is lol
#16
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
The best way to learn how to play in a certain style is to learn songs in that style. But you can't just say, "Ok. I'm going to memorize 'Little Wing' by Jimi Hendrix". You have to analyze what's going on. Learn WHY "Little Wing" works the way it works. So, for example, examine the harmony and chords. Hendrix was great at making (what could have easily been) boring chord progressions interesting.

For example, the basic chord progression for the verse of the song is:
Eminor, G, Aminor, Eminor, Bminor, Aminor, Cmajor, Gmajor, Fmajor, Cmajor, Dmajor.

But he doesn't just strum out the chords. He spices things up a bit. Here's the song, so you can tell what I mean:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8Xq0Y0dR-Q

Highlights off the top of my head:
  • The use of melody over chords similar to how you described.
  • Notice how, whenever he plays the Dmajor chord at the end of the verse, he lets it get quite. This naturally pushes towards the next verse or the chorus.
  • Hendrix always used double stops or "color notes" to spice up his rhythm playing. It's all over this particular song.


Fyi, Hendrix generally tuned to Eb standard. But you can play it in E standard, if you wish.


This is awesome! I've never heard anything from Jimi before... this is definitely the style I'd like to play above all.
#17
It's blues all right~! Everytime I hear "Little Wing" it reminds me Hendrix as 30 years ahead of his time~! I love both Erics, Satriani, & Vai's fretboard gymnastics but Hendrix blazed the trail for all of them. Before the masses knew him, Hendrix goes into this club in London where Clapton was playing w Cream & asked to sit in~! It was like "can I play God's guitar?" & he just smokes it of course~! Clapton was speechless the crowd erupted standing ovation & from then on everyone knew who Hendrix was~..& we still do~!

Listen to his stuff is absolutely right 'cause it's impossible to NOT learn something~!
#19
Quote by macashmack
Get out.

Truth hurts, but to each their own. Loven the blues rock though. Its like watching fireworks when i hear it.
#20
Quote by MistaChy
Truth hurts, but to each their own. Loven the blues rock though. Its like watching fireworks when i hear it.

Word. I don't see how you can hate jazz chords though. Any chord can sound good if used in the right context.
#21
Quote by MistaChy
This is awesome! I've never heard anything from Jimi before... this is definitely the style I'd like to play above all.
Then, study Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughn.

Quote by macashmack
Word. I don't see how you can hate jazz chords though. Any chord can sound good if used in the right context.

He just hasn't discovered the amazing sound of the Bbm13b5 chord yet.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Feb 10, 2014,