#1
Think I'm going to buy myself a nice present within the next couple months.

Just noticed the 2014 classic models. What do you guys think of those, do you like the "turbo" boost?

I don't know what it is, but I hate the mini-e-tune models; seems too gadget'y for old school gibson feel. Same with the turbo, but I'm on the fence.

I got about 2k-2.5k to waste.

Any input is appreciated -

Also I have a Faded Gibson SG from about 06. Those pickups are pretty descent and i got the guitar setup well; so I'm wanting to try to get a little diff sound from it,
#2
I personally like the idea of the boost. Gibson makes so many variants of the exact same design and what they're trying to do is appeal to different people's tastes by giving people more options, to make every model unique in their own way.

I personally think min-e-tune is a good product. It's alleviated virtually all the problems the old robot tuning design had. The justification for the product is that you're able to switch tunings quickly on the fly in a live situation, which does make sense.

As for the turbo design itself, it depends on how it really sounds. It's quite a good idea on paper since a lot of people want higher output from their pickups on Gibson LP's and you can do that now with the Classic LP's.
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#3
The 2014 classics are good, but with that kind of money you can go absolutely nuts on the used market.

Sticking strictly to Gibsons, you could get a 58 Reissue, which is a fantastic guitar, basically as nice a Les Paul as anyone could ask for. You're also in range of used Customs from certain years if you want a thinner neck.

You can also get some outstanding LP style guitars that are not made by Gibson. Huber, Collings, McInturff, and lots more are all potentially within your range used. There are some crazy good guitars out there, you don't have to stick to Gibson for a really good Les Paul experience.

I'd suggest poking around on The Gear Page, especially their classifieds section. They tend towards the higher end than UG does, so you'll probably find more information about instruments in your price range there than here.
#4
I'd be interested in the used market, except i'm not sure the best way to avoid copies or fakes? Any tips -
Hate to pay cash and have someone take me -
#5
Good ways to avoid fakes:
1. Buy used from a reputable shop (bit more expensive, lower selection, but foolproof)
2. Buy from a known member on an established forum (TGP is great for this, they have a reference system so you can see if the person you're buying from has been selling reliably for a few years)
3. Post pictures of a guitar you're looking to buy here, we're very good at spotting fakes. (obviously make sure there's no bait and switch once you see the guitar in person)
4. Do some research as you go to be able to identify some of the more obvious signs of a fake yourself.
#6
You could even afford a tricked-out Carvin or certain full custom guitars.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#8
Quote by boyd98
I got about 2k-2.5k to waste.

Any input is appreciated -

you get a very nice gently used gibson custom shop reissue for that money, which imo would be vastly superior to a '14 classic.

or plenty of non-gibson les paul type guitars with various differences from the original gibson LPs.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#9
If you're buying in person, you'll know if it's real or not, and if you can't...does it matter? You're getting a guitar you THINK is amazing and somehow worth more than a guitar 1/5 the price, the only thing that makes a Gibson a Gibson and worth money is the fact that it says Gibson on the headstock. For that kind of cash, don't pay before you play.

You could buy an epiphone, replace all the electronics, tuners, nut, bridge and frets with top of the line parts and STILL have $1,500. I don't mean to be that guy...but I'm just saying, you put the same parts they use in a $2,500 Les Paul into a $500 les paul and close your eyes, you'll never know the difference.
#10
Quote by Velcro Man
If you're buying in person, you'll know if it's real or not, and if you can't...does it matter? You're getting a guitar you THINK is amazing and somehow worth more than a guitar 1/5 the price, the only thing that makes a Gibson a Gibson and worth money is the fact that it says Gibson on the headstock. For that kind of cash, don't pay before you play.

You could buy an epiphone, replace all the electronics, tuners, nut, bridge and frets with top of the line parts and STILL have $1,500. I don't mean to be that guy...but I'm just saying, you put the same parts they use in a $2,500 Les Paul into a $500 les paul and close your eyes, you'll never know the difference.


Guitar's are two fold for me. One aspect is it's a tool. The other aspect is it's a piece of art. Sometimes you just want the painting, even though you could just get a cheap print and frame it.
#11
With that budget you could pick up a nice LP Custom from someone who doesn't play. I picked up one that still had the original strings on it for 2k. Or any newer Gibby in your price range really.

If you are gassing for a "real" LP you might want a volume and tone control for each pickup
Last edited by cheesefries at Feb 9, 2014,
#12
Quote by Roc8995
The 2014 classics are good, but with that kind of money you can go absolutely nuts on the used market.


Go re-read this post -- all good information.

The boost is no big deal, and it's something you can add inexpensively should you decide you want one. I have a sweepable mids boost on a push-pull (Chandler Tone-X), and for lead work, I really think it's a good choice.

I doubt very much that I'd cough up good money to pay for the price deterioration that happens when you walk a new (expensive) Gibson guitar out the front door of the shop. At the moment, all my Gibsons but one were built prior to 1980 (that's not an indictment of current versions; it just happened that way), and all of those were purchased used. If you're careful, you can get some spectacular guitars on the used market. I should note that I *do* buy new guitars; just picked up a Line 6 JTV-89F a couple of months ago. But there, the likelihood of a fake is infinitesimal, and there's really no way to get a used one...

I have a half-cocked theory about all the Gibson fakes on the used market; suppose that Gibson were actually tacitly allowing those fakes. Honestly, it's perfectly possible to build an absolutely accurate replica Gibson in your garage (this is how Gil Yaron and Derrig and Peter Baranet ("Max") managed it) from scratch. So why, given all the information available on the internet, should the mistakes on the Chibsons be relatively easy to spot?

Notice that Gibson makes absolutely NO money when the several million Gibsons on the used market change hands. But if you can scare a large enough percentage of those potential used buyers into buying new instead, Gibson profits go up. Hmmmm.
Last edited by dspellman at Feb 9, 2014,
#13
Quote by Velcro Man
If you're buying in person, you'll know if it's real or not, and if you can't...does it matter? You're getting a guitar you THINK is amazing and somehow worth more than a guitar 1/5 the price, the only thing that makes a Gibson a Gibson and worth money is the fact that it says Gibson on the headstock. For that kind of cash, don't pay before you play.

You could buy an epiphone, replace all the electronics, tuners, nut, bridge and frets with top of the line parts and STILL have $1,500. I don't mean to be that guy...but I'm just saying, you put the same parts they use in a $2,500 Les Paul into a $500 les paul and close your eyes, you'll never know the difference.


At $500 you'd still be playing a 10 piece basswood body with a mediocre burst.

But I get your sentiments, even if I don't necessarily agree fully.
Last edited by Mephaphil at Feb 9, 2014,