#1
Hi,
since where I live a lot of pubs are looking for acoustic live music more than "traditional" bands, I was wondering what the differences would be.
Also, I would like to start a 2/3 person band (guitarist/s and singer) because I think it may be more easy to work with (you know, easier to plan practice sessions, only 2 persons have to agree on things, easier to solve problems, etc.)
And of course, for me it would be a completely diffrent world....

So, my questions are:

-as for gear, I guess you can't play an electric guitar on a clean setting...how much would I have to spend to have a decent guitar+accessories to go acoustic?
-from a technical point of view, is it much diffrent? I mean, would I be supposed to play that super pro classical guitar fingerpicking or not? How about soloing and similar stuff? Does it need more precision than playing on electric (I mean, are mistakes that more much noticeable)?
-and, most of all, what about music theory? I mean, I would be supposed to arrange rock music to acoustic...so, do I need to be a very advanced guitar player?

Actually I've been playing for almost 3 years, and I play in a Judas Priest tribute band (so 2 electric guitars, etc.). I also have a study-band, which means we try songs just for progressing as musicians, without intent to play live.

The only "acoustic" things I played are "Angel" and "Diamonds and rust" (the acoustic version), both from Judas Priest, and I have to say that I found them easier than most of the other songs we play....but again, it's really basic stuff from a guitaristic point of view.
Well, and some arpeggios my teacher taught me to improve technically, the most difficult I learned was "Carpe Diem" from Dream Theater.

Technically, I consider myself an average guitar player (on electric using a pick).

So, what would I need to know? Should I give it a try?

Also, I almost forgot...how about frontmanship/interaction with audience when playing acoustic?

Thanks in advance and sorry for my bad english and the noob questions!
#2
why couldn´t you play an electric guitar on a clean setting?....your going to need some form of PA for vocals and bas so you´ll be electrifying your accoustic anyhow!?!?!

as for your limitations...they are only dependant on the venue you play and what you bring......if your a good enough singer and have a tight band you can get away with plenty ;-) Find a second guitarist or a great bas player and work out a tight set from there...we always fart around with the classics...Judas Priests "breaking the law" sounds awesome with an accoustic guitar and a banjo!! Play what you love and the only limitations you should technically have is the PA, larger venues will need larger PA´s with miked instruments
I believe in god, jesus and the holy ghost.....or as i call them Angus, Kirk and Lemmy
#3
Thanks!

Any advices/comments from the technical point of view of playing the instrument and arranging stuff?
#4
What style of music are you thinking of performing? If you want to go all out and sing and play in a coffee shop playing acoustic guitars, then that's fine. But I think you can do well with an electric guitar played clean. It probably depends on the kind of music you want to play. And doing metal songs on an acoustic can be fun - it depends on your interests and the type of audience you want. You can still do finger picking on an electric guitar.

Switching to acoustic will generally mean playing with heavier strings and that will help your finger strength. If you're used to playing just power chords and distortion, you'll need to finesse things a little differently with an acoustic. And if you plug your acoustic into anything loud, feedback can be really annoying.

Be sure to pick some musicians that can sing also and add harmonies. And there are many ways you can arrange the songs. You might want one acoustic guitar and one electric or whatever fits your style of music. Having two people playing the same chords in the same neck positions and not sounding muddy can be an issue - so you might want to have one person adding fills or playing the chords in a different position. Just some things to think about....
#5
Regarding your technique question, it depends. Some techniques might be used more on acoustic than on electric and vise versa, it depends on the style. If you were to play the exact same style on acoustic and electric though i would argue that it is somewhat harder on acoustic, just cause you have more string tension, often you play acoustics with thicker strings and the design might restrict your playing abit.

That is the reason why i mainly practice on acoustic, even when learning electric guitar parts and riffs. On acoustic it's even more important that you articulate each note cause otherwise it will sound really sloppy. So i often start on acoustic and then move on to electric to get the muting right, if needed.

That being said, most techniques cross over between the instruments, and depending on the style you are going to play you might want to brush up on your fingerpicking, or your chord comping etc.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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