#1
Its always been really hard for me to learn stuff like this thats down to memory. I really want to learn to play guitar though, so any help is appreciated. If theres any websites that help me learn chords or whatever, links would be good. I've been playing guitar for around a month now but in that time i've just really been practicing strumming patterns and techniques, fingerpicking, and other stuff like that. I've got all that down now pretty much, so i should start on chords i guess. I am ordering a guide for guitar soon from online which includes level 1 and 2 help and lessons, but untill then i'm on my own. I've had no lessons or whatever so all i know is what i've taught myself, but i need a little help with chords. So, anyways, any links or methods/techniques that are good for learning chords would be helpful:p
BQ: songs with really slow chord progression? Its not so much the chords i have a problem with as it is moving from one chord to another, i'm a girl and i have small hands xD i think playing songs with few chords in and slow chord progression may help me learn some, so any songs you know of like that would help too.

Apoligies if this is in the wrong category, didn't really know where to put it xD

Thanks in advance
Last edited by sam1203 at Feb 11, 2014,
#2
G, C,D...you can play thousands of songs. It's just the I, IV, V movement in the key of Gmaj
Sweet Home Alabama...ect

Use your pinky on the high G note. This way when you makes transitions to other chords
it's easier.
You can also play More than words...like so. Just use alternative bass notes.
It's like folk music style playing but it helps you make chord transition and play little
fills between chords easier.

Then stair way to heaven to help you get started in barring.
Dust in the wind. it'll help you alternate between your index and pinky

Practice playing 12 bar blues using power chord and using your picky to
hit the shuffle note. It'll give your pinky a work out.
You don't have to bar it fully.
Plus you'll get use to playng songs not always in open position.
Start at the 5th fret until your fingers get stronger.
Do practice to make that Fmaj chord as a full bar chord, eventually.

I learn to play off of this song because you don't have to use all your fingers
to make those chords. I was only 8.lol

Cmaj, Gmaj, Dsus9, Amin...You just make the Dsus9 chord with open E.lol
Then gose right into Amin. Easy transition....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfTSCr1al14

Then I went to this. These type of songs are more manageable.
They're not long. So you can remember them eaiser.
They don't have crazy stretch chords but challenging enough to improve my playing.
You can get tabs for them if you get lost.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amT_qZtGn7Y

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7EpHxc7_EI
Last edited by smc818 at Feb 11, 2014,
#3
Changing chords is pretty difficult, especially with the more awkwardly fingered ones. Don't worry about it too much at the start.

don't get bogged down in the theory, but if you could learn some basic theory which explains what chords are, that might help. the complete idiot's guide to music theory book is pretty good, it starts with the basics and doesn't get too complex, but (IMO) isn't patronising either.

Once you get the ability to barre down, learning movable barre chord shapes will help you to learn a lot of chords quickly, too.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
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#4
Uh that stuff above is not really something for someone just starting out.

You're looking to learn the common open chords and start with the easy ones. Em, E, Am, A, Dm, D, C, G. This stuff will be in your book and you can play a ton of music with it. Then you learn barre chords, suspended, 7th, add etc and everything opens up.

I recommend http://justinguitar.com/ and check out his beginner lessons, they're good and the guy is pleasant.

Slow progressions or song suggestions etc, this depends so much on what sort of music you want to play because it's extremely important you enjoy yourself and like the music you're learning. Most artists and bands have songs that are beginner friendly. If your book suggests you learn some silly traditional/children's song you dislike - don't do it because they'll make you want to throw your guitar out the window. You can search this site for chords for song you like. Play them at your own tempo until you get better.
#5
Im new to this too and from what Ive been told (through learning at Justinguitar.com) is that you WILL get better learning chords by PRACTICING THEM. I see the improvement already speaking for myself.
"You're an individual and so are all of these guitars – it's really difficult for somebody else to tell you what's going to be right for you." - Revenge of the Naked Ape
#6
Some great advice above. You get the hang of a few of the common open chords and there is a lot you can play, not to mention enjoyable time relaxing and strumming chords and coming up with stuff.

I'd recommend starting by learning the easiest open chords first, and learning one that are easy to switch between. For example, switching between Am and C requires moving only one finger, so that is a good chord change to learn early on. Going from D to G is just a smidge harder but still fairly easy, so that would be a good change to tackle after you've got Am to C down. Build up the difficulty gradually.
#7
Hi guys,

This is the best online guitar lessons site imho. There are general lessons and note for note solos. Great teaching and a lot of free videos too. He has a lot of lessons just on chords. I bought a few lessons and they are GREAT, he really explains everything well. The site is

*********


Paul
#8
call me a cynic, but i'm always suspicious when someone who registered this month and who has 6 posts (all of which advertise the same site) claims to be someone who just bought some awesome new product.

*reported*
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
I second practicing the 12 bar blues. You'd be surprised how often those chords will find their way into other music. Also, learn your basic E and A formation bar chords up and down the neck (E barred at the first fret is F; A barred at the third fret is C; etc.). An awesome song that helped me greatly was Hey Joe, by Jimi Hendrix. It uses:

1. C (A chord barred at third fret)
2. G (E chord barred at third fret)
3. D (A chord barred at fifth fret)
4. A (E chord barred at fifth fret)
5. E (played normally, or A chord barred at seventh fret)

Learn to play it both with the regular chords and the bar chords. Then learn to mix and match. I won't explain the theory behind why learning this will help, but it will help down the road. Or at least, this really helped me. I know that if you're just starting, it probably sounds overwhelming. Practice, practice, practice, so the chords become muscle memory. Go as slow as you need to in order to get the rhythm right. Then gradually speed it up as you get more comfortable. Changing chords are tough for everybody at the beginning, and there are no secret shortcuts. Just know that it'll come, even if it feels like it is taking a really long time.

Finally, if I could start over again, I would have started singing early on, while the whole thing felt awkward anyway. Now I can play a mean guitar, but I can't sing while I play, so I'm going back and retracing my steps in order to do them both at the same time.