#1
Hey guys! First time posting on this subforum.

I recently received a Presonus Sound Box USB interface for a birthday present. It came with the Studio One DAW.

Just messing around the other night, I was attempting to dial in a good recording tone and just didn't achieve it. I think the problem might be my microphone.

It is a Peavey PVi 100, which is a pretty cheap but well-constructed dynamic mic. I'm not certain it is really made to handle distorted guitar. I close-mic'd it just on the edge of the dustcap of one of my Eminence Governors. I adjusted the channel gain on the Presonus so as not to get any clipping. I must say, that adjustment works very well, because I was able to crank the amp and still not get any clipping.

The problem is, the recorded sound is not the same as the sound I hear up close to the speaker. It's just not as rich and clear. (I play death/black metal btw.) My rig sounds amazing in person, and I'd like to get as close as possible to it in a recording.

I see that a lot of people use a Shure SM57. If I were to purchase one of those, would it make a huge difference? I was hoping not to spend much more money, but I may have to. I also need to get some noise-isolating headphones. Thanks for any advice!
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#2
No you don't need to get isolating headphones.
You don't even need heaphones actually, monitor speakers are usually better bangs for the buck.

You don't even need an SM57, you need to start learning how to mix stuff - that will help a damn lot more than buying new gear at this point.
First of all you may wanna get the mic a bit further from the dustcap to get more bass.
Then double track the thing, meaning you record two takes of you playing the same thing and then you put them together, generally hard panned left and right when talking 'bout guitars.
Then you get your EQ of choice and you start fiddling around, cutting a bit of high highs and low lows, boosting a bit of lows and maybe mids and maybe highs...
Whatever you like best.

Experiment with that kinda stuff and try different microphones positions, too.
As for the speakers, have a look at makie DRM stuff if you fancy, or cheap yamahas if your up for something cheaper.
And unless you're sure about that particular model or exception, stay the hell away from behringer's stuff.
Name's Luca.

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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
Good suggestions already - But I have a suggestion...

If you want an SM57 - Search on Amazon for the GLS ES-57. It's a clone of the SM57 and it's DAMN GOOD. I actually like it more in many cases than my SM57s and you can buy 3 of them for less than the cost of one SM57.
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I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
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#4
Thanks for the suggestions guys! As for mic placement, I have the end of the mic touching the grill cloth, but I'd say the speaker dust cap is still a good 4" away inside the cab. Should I back the mic away from the dust cap? Or did you (Spambot) mean that I should move the mic laterally away from the dust cap? I'm aware of how those adjustments affect the sound -- closer to the center gives you more "bite"while further away increases bass/decreases bite.

Matrix, I'm definitely going to look into those GLS mics. I still can't help but think my ~$20 Peavey mic just isn't quite up to the task. The recorded tone really doesn't hold a candle to the actual tone I'm getting -- and I don't think it's all in my technique; I'm basically setting it up exactly like I've seen in numerous video tutorials.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#5
^ah, don't trust the video tutorials, trust your ears.
I meant to move it in general, y' know.
The thing would be to try and see how you like the different positions.
Also, when you find a position you think to be good, re adjust the amp's EQ settings and lower the gain if you wanna double track stuff.

Recorded stuff is a tat different than the stuff you hear, so the principle is that you wanna adjust your settings for what you're recording instead of what you're hearing.
For that purpose some kind of headphones would be nice to have so if you have a pair, use it.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#6
^^@Spambot. Thank you for your advice not to get a new microphone. I've found out that mine is indeed capable of capturing good tone. Yesterday I recorded some pretty decent tracks just by micing further away from the center of the speaker. It was just too harsh closer to the dust cap. I actually made three tracks of the same riff and played around with the panning and it sounds pretty good. I'll definitely buy a nicer mic at some point, but it's not an emergency right now. It might actually be a good thing because now I'll learn how to position mics and be able to appreciate a better mic when I finally decide to spring for one.

One more question though -- what do people typically use for mic stands? The setup I have now is ridiculous; I have to set my mic on boxes/hang it from various items. I don't think I want something as large as a vocal mic stand, but I do need something that can reach any of the 4 speakers in my cab. Budget -- $30, lol.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood