#1
Hello everyone,

I am currently selling an amp to raise funds for some new studio monitors.

My "studio" setup currently consists of a mac, focusrite liquid saffire 56 a few mics and headphones. I record mainly acoustic guitar with vocals, but will be looking to expand onto full band scenarios as soon as i raise the funds to convert my garage which may be a few years.

The next logical step seemed to get some decent studio monitors. Currently i am very short of space as my set up is in my bedroom on a work top. The studio monitors will be with there backs against the wall so i think front bass port will probably be best.

Since short of space ive opted to go for a 5" model, i am looking to spend around the £300 mark and ive been looking at the following models:

- Prodipe Pro ribbon 5
- Yamaha HS5
- Presonus Eris E5
- Adam F5
- KRK Rokit 5 G3
- Mackie MR5 MK3

Judging by the frequency response the Prodipe pro ribbon 5 has the biggest range just above the Adam f5. I know this isnt the only thing to go by but at the minute its leading me forwards one of these two.

The main purpose of the monitors will be mixing and precise listening so i want something with a flat output. I know its hard to get good bass out of small speakers which is why i was looking at the frequency response range!

If anyone has any advice about Monitors of this size in this price range it would be very much appreciated.

Billy.
#2
I didn't like the F5s.

Rokits are awful.

HS5s are known good.

Not a fan of the Mackies.

Haven't tried the Eris 5s, but I do like the 8s.

No idea on the Prodipes.
Current Gear:
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Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
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Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
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#3
Unless you absolutely can't fit bigger speakers, I'd think about going a little bigger than that, honestly. Even in a small room, I'd argue an 8" speaker would be better than 5s, if you have the space. A 5" speaker just can't accurately portray a wide scale of frequencies If you can bump up to even 6.5", that'd be great. The Yamaha HS7s would be great.

However, if you HAVE to go with a 5:

The Prodipe 8s are supposed to be excellent, don't know about the 5s.

The Yamahas have a great reputation, but not a lot of low end. They work exceptionally well with a sub, though.

The Eris line is pretty good. Nothing spectactular, but nothing particularly bad. A pretty safe option IMO, but the 5s are, again, not ideal, and there's better options in the 8" price range.

The Adams I haven't tried. The A5X, though, I found to be pretty decent for such small speakers. I've heard the F series is very similar to the A's once they're broken in, and you shouldn't judge their sound by the factory fresh speakers.

The Rokits have a hyped low end that makes them very inaccurate. Great for hip hop, but unless you find 8s for cheap, I'd pass on anything in that series.

The Mackies, I haven't tried in this size... But I was actually very impressed with the 8" version. They seem to get a bad rap, but I thought that, while they had a big low end, it was accurate.
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#4
I probably like the mackies the most out of what you've listed. As matrixclaw said, the rokits have a hyped low end that I hated. Lots of people like them though. The yammies have probably the best high mids out of the ones you've listed, but really do lack low end. If you have a decent set of headphones you can probably get by with them though. The HS8's [never tried the 7's but I think they'd be great] are fantastic.

I'd honestly look at behringer truths. I got a pair of B3030A's for $200AU (so they definitely should be able to be had under your budget), and they are fantastic for the price. Liked them more than anything else I tried. The 2030A's or 2031A's are pretty damn good too imo.
Behringer is a bit of a hit and miss brand, but some of their stuff is really really decent.
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#5
Hmm, well i doesn't have to be a 5" guess. If its slightly bigger its not a missive issue, if it will greatly benefit the audio. What would you guys suggest at £300 price range but not much bigger than a 5" i really don't have much space at all!

I looked at the 6" version of the mackies because their not much bigger than the 5's but they are rear ported, as they are going to be pretty much with their backs to the wall is that going to be an issue?

But then looking at frequency response the Prodipe pro ribbon 5 has a range of 50hz-30khz and the mackie mr7mk3 has a range of 46hz-20khz. Will the extra 4hz's of lower frequencies evern be noticed? The prodipes also have 10khz better top end range.

Then looking at the adam f5 the range is 52hz to 50khz so that has masses more top end than both and only a few hz's less bass so would they not be best?
Last edited by billabob at Feb 13, 2014,
#6
^ stop looking at frequency response advertisements, seriously.
That, as much as frequency response curves, are something not to believe to in my experience.

Last pair of headphones I got are RHA50s.
It basically went like this:
I look for a good 5 minutes at the box, reading stuff and looking at pictures.
Then I try them and I go back checking the frequency response diagram.
For ****'s sake it wasn't even close.
Then they got broken in, and they got better, but still they weren't what was advertised at all.

Plus, I have seen pretty funny and presumably overly hyped stuff around - MDR7520s should go up to 80kHz and down to 5Hz.

Plus, hearing goes from about 20 to about 20k Hz, and under 60-80Hz stuff is baerly distinguishable - say really low bass drum thumps are under 80Hz.
You will most likely not be able to tell the difference between a cut at 52 and 46Hz, and you'll most likely not be able to tell the difference between a cut at 30k to 50kHz, first one because the sound there is almost the same (and is dropped in volume anyway - whatever the device you're using to play your sound, sounds at that frequencies will be really low in volume anyway unless you're talking about a sub), and the second because you couldn't hear them.
The reason why they are capable of reproducing that kinda stuff is because they would create distortion if they were fed with such sounds and not being able to reproduce them.
Read this if you wanna know why, the principle is the same.
How to solve the thing without buying 7520s?
Just put a high cut filter at 20kHz, 18 to 48db x octave so you don't feed your monitors with stuff they're not able to reproduce.

Basing myself on the reviews and internet only, up for the yamahas and the mackies.
Basing on my personal experience, if you gotta spend that much money on it you better be damn sure you spent your money on the right thing, so find them and try them all.
Name's Luca.

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#7
Thanks for the reply spambot, gave me something to think about. I think ill take your advise and go to a music shop next week. Even if i dont buy ill get an idea.

At the minute iv'e been talked into getting a slightly bigger speaker, the yamaha hs7 is my choice atm but ill see when i go and listen to them!
#8
Quote by Spambot_2
^ stop looking at frequency response advertisements, seriously.
That, as much as frequency response curves, are something not to believe to in my experience.

Last pair of headphones I got are RHA50s.
It basically went like this:
I look for a good 5 minutes at the box, reading stuff and looking at pictures.
Then I try them and I go back checking the frequency response diagram.
For ****'s sake it wasn't even close.
Then they got broken in, and they got better, but still they weren't what was advertised at all.

Plus, I have seen pretty funny and presumably overly hyped stuff around - MDR7520s should go up to 80kHz and down to 5Hz.

Plus, hearing goes from about 20 to about 20k Hz, and under 60-80Hz stuff is baerly distinguishable - say really low bass drum thumps are under 80Hz.
You will most likely not be able to tell the difference between a cut at 52 and 46Hz, and you'll most likely not be able to tell the difference between a cut at 30k to 50kHz, first one because the sound there is almost the same (and is dropped in volume anyway - whatever the device you're using to play your sound, sounds at that frequencies will be really low in volume anyway unless you're talking about a sub), and the second because you couldn't hear them.
The reason why they are capable of reproducing that kinda stuff is because they would create distortion if they were fed with such sounds and not being able to reproduce them.
Read this if you wanna know why, the principle is the same.
How to solve the thing without buying 7520s?
Just put a high cut filter at 20kHz, 18 to 48db x octave so you don't feed your monitors with stuff they're not able to reproduce.

Basing myself on the reviews and internet only, up for the yamahas and the mackies.
Basing on my personal experience, if you gotta spend that much money on it you better be damn sure you spent your money on the right thing, so find them and try them all.

You know the fundamental of the low E on a bass is 41Hz right?
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#9
The only other question i have is that the speakers will be with there backs to the wall, does this mean ill have to stick to front ported monitors?

I just ask because the yamaha's have rear ported!
#10
Quote by oneblackened
You know the fundamental of the low E on a bass is 41Hz right?
And you'll probably not be able to tell the difference between an E or an F if you were to hear the fundamentals only.
Plus it's a mess down there, and lotsa equipment can't reproduce that stuff for shit.

Open back monitors should be a bit of a problem if you point them towards something that creates a sensible amount of reflections.
Worst thing that can happen in my experience is that you have a plain flat wall behind the monitors, and you gotta hang something fluffy on the wall to reduce the reflections.
Name's Luca.

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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#11
Ok, so would it be a safer bet just to go for something a similar kinda of design but with front ports?
#12
Spambot talks some sense here, but the thing about feeding monitors high signals is not true - AD/DA converters in all interfaces have brick wall filters in them outside human hearing range to prevent this. There is no need for you to put an LPF on your mix at 20kHz, it will have no impact, other than any changes the algorithm might make to your mix in the audible range, and if the dip before the corner frequency makes audible changes below 20kHZ. It may also introduce phase distortion around that point, but you wouldn't hear the change… maybe see a tiny change to the waveform if computer software analysed the mix before and after

Also, while the level a speaker goes down to is a moot point after 50Hz to some people (like you) the steepness of the roll-off is very noticeable and furthermore, you are forgetting that a lot of modern music is mixed down this low so there is a lot of energy down there - you might not think the bass fundamental is identifiable as a discrete note, but it will be affected by how tight the response is down that low.


I agree about wanting front-firing ports if you're getting ported speakers though.
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#13
Hmm, ive been looking around for some front ported speakers to no avail in my size/price bracket. There are some 5 and 8" models by a few companies but i havent got the space for an 8" speaker and ive been talked away from 5" now!
#14
KRK Rokit series are probably in your price range, the 6" are what I'd recommend for accuracy vs speaker size. Ignore what oneblackened said about them, it's his opinion and is fairly baseless; Matrix doesn't personally like them but each to their own - they are actually pretty accurate speakers, the 8" in particular, and if you read enough reviews instead of just what is said here you'll realise that. For some reason I'm just in a minority here about them, despite all the times I've listed their frequency response accuracy across the board with no more than 1.5db bumps even for the 5"
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#15
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Spambot talks some sense here, but the thing about feeding monitors high signals is not true - AD/DA converters in all interfaces have brick wall filters in them outside human hearing range to prevent this. There is no need for you to put an LPF on your mix at 20kHz, it will have no impact, other than any changes the algorithm might make to your mix in the audible range, and if the dip before the corner frequency makes audible changes below 20kHZ. It may also introduce phase distortion around that point, but you wouldn't hear the change… maybe see a tiny change to the waveform if computer software analysed the mix before and after

Also, while the level a speaker goes down to is a moot point after 50Hz to some people (like you) the steepness of the roll-off is very noticeable and furthermore, you are forgetting that a lot of modern music is mixed down this low so there is a lot of energy down there - you might not think the bass fundamental is identifiable as a discrete note, but it will be affected by how tight the response is down that low.


I agree about wanting front-firing ports if you're getting ported speakers though.
Aww, aaight, sorry for the confusion I caused.

Though, I still got a thing I'd like to clarify (or be clarified by someone correcting me) - most people don't use real good quality audio equipment to listen to stuff, so say my phone's DAC probably don't have that kinda stuff, so it's safer to cut them anyway if you ask me.
If you don't want phase distortion apply at a frequency high enough you don't hear it.

Don't talk to me about how modern music is mixed, really.
More or less all of the modern mainstream music and a lot of the rest is basically mixed with the philosophy of compressing stuff, fist example that comes to my mind is macklemore's thrift shop.
Damn you get soooo ****in' much sub-bass and bass you can barely hear the vocals.
In my opinion, stuff that low in frequency is to be used to fill up the intelligible part of the song that's being mixed, and to lotsa producers it's to be used to overly compress and say "hey guyz look at how my mix is louder than yours so it's better".

Anyway that's just my opinion.
But my point was that TS shouldn't base his decision about what to buy basing himself on the stated lowest emittable frequency, for it's not a reliable information at all, both because you could either have a cut starting at Xdb at 51Hz and ending at 0db at 50Hz or a cut starting at Xdb at 120Hz and ending at 0db at 50Hz, and because in my experience, that kinda statements are either made up or inaccurate as shit.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#16
I think you're missing my point - how do the vast majority of people record their music these days? Digitally, e.g. going through a stage of A/D conversion in the first place. At the input stage, the signals are filtered out beyond the range of human hearing, so any frequencies you're worried about are already gone before they hit your DAW. I'd imagine most interfaces have their filters set around 22kHz or something, maybe even a little higher, so any phase shift or cut before the corner frequency still won't have an impact on the *ahem* audible audio.


Basically, you really don't need to worry about that so much.
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