#1
So, I found a copy of the Yes - Complete Deluxe Edition songbook, featuring all of their songs from their debut through to Drama, at a thrift store today.

Now, I know my theory, and I own a pretty big tab book collection with lots of tasty notation inside, but not many books without tablature. So I'm trying to learn pieces from this book and it's truly a wonderful experience. It's like I'm dusting off parts of my brain I haven't used since I was barely a teenager. I'm even getting the hang of bass clef again! I've managed to learn most of the tunes from Tales From Topographic Oceans so far, and it's been a lot of fun!

So, has anyone else ever had an experience like this where they used to be really good at reading notation and ended up having to pick it up again? Have you ever given yourself a pat on the back for learning a hard tune using notation? Or are you planning on learning some songs without tab in the near future?

Next, I plan on tackling The Frank Zappa Guitar Book and a PDF of ELP's "Tarkus", though the "easy" stuff is still like a 7/10.
Q: Favourite Pink Floyd song?
A: The one where they get wicked high and play Emin and A for an hour.
Last edited by travislausch at Feb 12, 2014,
#2
took me a while to finally learn to read notation. sight reading helped me become a much better musician, it helps me to see the actual notes when i analyze transcribed improvisations instead of fret numbers and understand better music, it helps me for solfege/ear training, etc
i try to avoid tabs as much as possible right now
#3
One disadvantage of learning a song solely through standard notation is that it only tells you what notes you are playing, and not where to play them. As we know, a single note in one specific octave can occur in as many as four different locations on a 22 fret guitar.

On the flip side, one disadvantage of learning a song solely through tabs is that it is much harder to dictate rhythm in a tab than it is to dictate rhythm using standard notation.

Because of this, I like to compose in GP6 using a combination of standard notation and tabs.

As far as learning other people's music, I prefer neither and would rather use my ear so I can develop that further.
#4
Quote by STONESHAKER
One disadvantage of learning a song solely through standard notation is that it only tells you what notes you are playing, and not where to play them. As we know, a single note in one specific octave can occur in as many as four different locations on a 22 fret guitar.

On the flip side, one disadvantage of learning a song solely through tabs is that it is much harder to dictate rhythm in a tab than it is to dictate rhythm using standard notation.

While both of these things are true, you can figure out the frets pretty easily if you know how certain note combinations work. And who's to say the tabs will be correct? A lot of times, I see tabs with wrong finger positions but right notes, like pretty much every version of Cowboys From Hell I've ever seen, including the tab book version!
Q: Favourite Pink Floyd song?
A: The one where they get wicked high and play Emin and A for an hour.
#5
Oh, yeah man. Most of the tabs up on UG aren't correct. Well, maybe not most, but half of them? I don't know, that's a pretty rough estimate. The only tabs I trust are the ones I make for myself in GP6! I don't really transcribe guitar anymore, mostly just drums now as a way of helping myself compose better drum parts and so I can build my own backing tracks.
#6
It is generally easier and quicker to learn and understand rhythmic notation than it is to learn notes on the stave. Once you are more familiar with rhythm values, you can pick up the rhythm from the notation and use the tab for the notes. This can save time so you don't always need to sit with a CD/MP3 to work out the rhythm patterns.
#7
1) Positions can be notated, though it's mostly a classical thing

2) Figuring out positions is part of guitar competency

3) There's no rule that you have to play the notes in all the same places as the original artist

Who knows if the transcriptionist was even playing it the same as the artist. Some ambiguity is OK, it makes you think harder.
#8
it's almost impossible to find that stuff for free. you'll have to pay for real music notation, either by ordering online,