#1
Hello everybody, i'm a newbie here and badly need some experienced advices in picking up alternative wood or other material to substitute Baltic Birch plywood which i have no access in my country, Malaysia (duh), by which i have to pay a lot for the shipping fee if i ever trying to buy a 8x4 online and thus defeated the purpose of diy: cost saving, and better off buying a ready made good ol' 1960 new or used.

Been thinking of using solid wood for cab body and MDF for baffle and back panel, maybe throwing in some wool for insulation. I'm trying to get the big sound that we heard in heavy metal, the cab schematic is closely based on Marshall 1960B.

Any help will be appreciated. And yes, I play both hard rock and metal, occasionally blues, so tight low end and midrangey sound is what I'm after. Thanks.
#2
The reason for using 3/4" baltic birch plywood is that it's fairly impact resistant, won't warp and is both lighter and more moisture resistant than MDF. No reason not to go the direction you're thinking of; are you gigging the cabinet a lot? If not, just make the whole thing out of MDF.

If you use solid wood, you can actually use 1/2", but you'll want to add some bracing to maintain the stiffness and structural integrity. You'll actually end up with a lighter weight cabinet, but it will be *stronger* than the 3/4" birch ply version. Check this out (batting in place). FWIW, these are full-range bass cabs with a single 15" speaker, a 6" mids driver and a tweeter that handle up to 900W of output without oilcanning or farting out.

:

Most 4x12s are built out of the heavier material because it takes more labor to build lighter and with bracing (as you can probably imagine). The back panel in particular is prone to producing a sympathetic resonance in a tone that corresponds to the wavelength delineated by the diagonal measurement of the back panel. This is why Marshall tossed the 2x2 or 2x4 kludge brace that you see in virtually every 4x12:



If you use the sort of bracing I'm suggesting, it's unlikely that the back panel will produce this vibration, but you may as well add the post anyway <G>.

This bracing is put on there with Loctite Premium PL glue, held in place until the glue dries with a few brads (get a brad gun and your cabinet will go together really fast):



This industrial adhesive is SO strong that people are building the whole cabinet out of it. You'll want some big furniture clamps to hold things together while the glue sets. Rent them or borrow them if you can, don't buy. A couple of tubes will be more than enough. Make sure that your cabinet is air tight when you're done; you'll get a lot more power out of it if you do.

I don't cover cabinets with tolex any more. It's fussy, you have to cut it just so, pasting it is a pain. I use two things: Duratex (it's a rubberized textured paint that you can put on with a roller and it looks like tolex when you're done, except that it doesn't rip and you can repair dings very easily)... or LineX. I don't know if they have it in Malaysia, but it's a very very tough pickup truck bed liner that's sprayed on hot, dries in a few seconds, and is virtually indestructible. Look up Mythbusters LineX on You Tube. Better yet, check it out on the LineX website. You probably have something similar over there, but maybe under a different name. It's thicker and heavier than Duratex, but it will literally stop bullets. The military has begun using it on buildings and vehicles. http://www.linex.com/ and http://www.linex.com/pages/2010/military/
Last edited by dspellman at Feb 14, 2014,
#4
Quote by ethan_hanus
I'm gonna build a 112 cab out of red oak, so yeah, hard wood is possible.


That's going to be pretty; be sure to post photos when you're done!
#6
Quote by freezaxp
Hello everybody, i'm a newbie here and badly need some experienced advices in picking up alternative wood or other material to substitute Baltic Birch plywood which i have no access in my country, Malaysia (duh), by which i have to pay a lot for the shipping fee if i ever trying to buy a 8x4 online and thus defeated the purpose of diy: cost saving, and better off buying a ready made good ol' 1960 new or used.

Been thinking of using solid wood for cab body and MDF for baffle and back panel, maybe throwing in some wool for insulation. I'm trying to get the big sound that we heard in heavy metal, the cab schematic is closely based on Marshall 1960B.

Any help will be appreciated. And yes, I play both hard rock and metal, occasionally blues, so tight low end and midrangey sound is what I'm after. Thanks.

I think you could actually buy a 1960B for far less than it would cost to build one, speakers are pretty expensive.
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
#7
Quote by dspellman
The reason for using 3/4" baltic birch plywood is that it's fairly impact resistant, won't warp and is both lighter and more moisture resistant than MDF. No reason not to go the direction you're thinking of; are you gigging the cabinet a lot? If not, just make the whole thing out of MDF.

If you use solid wood, you can actually use 1/2", but you'll want to add some bracing to maintain the stiffness and structural integrity. You'll actually end up with a lighter weight cabinet, but it will be *stronger* than the 3/4" birch ply version. Check this out (batting in place). FWIW, these are full-range bass cabs with a single 15" speaker, a 6" mids driver and a tweeter that handle up to 900W of output without oilcanning or farting out.

:

Most 4x12s are built out of the heavier material because it takes more labor to build lighter and with bracing (as you can probably imagine). The back panel in particular is prone to producing a sympathetic resonance in a tone that corresponds to the wavelength delineated by the diagonal measurement of the back panel. This is why Marshall tossed the 2x2 or 2x4 kludge brace that you see in virtually every 4x12:



If you use the sort of bracing I'm suggesting, it's unlikely that the back panel will produce this vibration, but you may as well add the post anyway <G>.

This bracing is put on there with Loctite Premium PL glue, held in place until the glue dries with a few brads (get a brad gun and your cabinet will go together really fast):



This industrial adhesive is SO strong that people are building the whole cabinet out of it. You'll want some big furniture clamps to hold things together while the glue sets. Rent them or borrow them if you can, don't buy. A couple of tubes will be more than enough. Make sure that your cabinet is air tight when you're done; you'll get a lot more power out of it if you do.

I don't cover cabinets with tolex any more. It's fussy, you have to cut it just so, pasting it is a pain. I use two things: Duratex (it's a rubberized textured paint that you can put on with a roller and it looks like tolex when you're done, except that it doesn't rip and you can repair dings very easily)... or LineX. I don't know if they have it in Malaysia, but it's a very very tough pickup truck bed liner that's sprayed on hot, dries in a few seconds, and is virtually indestructible. Look up Mythbusters LineX on You Tube. Better yet, check it out on the LineX website. You probably have something similar over there, but maybe under a different name. It's thicker and heavier than Duratex, but it will literally stop bullets. The military has begun using it on buildings and vehicles. http://www.linex.com/ and http://www.linex.com/pages/2010/military/


Wow, THAT's very informative for my current problem faced, dspellman. No I'm not gigging currently, the cab is for my home studio use. Humidity here in Malaysia is pretty high, so using MDF for main structure is kind of risky. Which type of hardwood to use is another big question here, been heard that using maple should suffice? The point for me is try to make it as few resonance as possible, do adding foam against the inner wall help? As shown in the picture of your cab. oh ya btw, NICE 4x12 CAB!!

For the brad gun part I have no air compressor to operate that, can i skip it and instead use C-clamp? That textured paint thing is really good alternative for tolex, which i have trouble finding it here in major cities (stupid country btw). For the LineX i better stay away from it as im afraid that i can no longer undo the paint lol
#8
Quote by Viban
I think you could actually buy a 1960B for far less than it would cost to build one, speakers are pretty expensive.


With the shipping fee included.... that thing will cost me well over USD10k
#9
Do not use MDF for the baffle at all, use plywood.

You do not need Baltic Birch, you can use pine, oak, maple plywood. Have you looked at ordering a Harley Benton G212 vintage or G412 vintage cab from www.thomann.de ? They ship world wide and the cabs are very inexpensive and have V30's stock. Shoot them an Email and find out what they would charge to ship to you
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#10
Robbgnarly, ok i will do my best to avoid using MDF. The country im from having really limited choice of woods, i would be jumping for joy if found anything exotic. Thanks for the link, i will check that out. The reason for me to diy cab not just because of saving cost but also letting myself to learn a new thing
#11
Anybody still around? Hello.... i really don't know which type of hardwood to use, some one help me please
#13
I researched around my area for sawmills where i can acquire some hardwood. Can i just use teak in place of baltic birch? And i would like to just butt joint all the planks together as I'm not so good in wood working, or dove tail/finger joints is a must?

Thanks
#14
Ya know if you didn't use MDF for your back and baffle your cab would already be better than 95% of the Marshall cabs out there

If you wanted to build a Marshall clone you could probably just pick up a real unloaded one off someone for less than 200 bucks and save time/money. I got my 1960 unloaded for 150 bucks.
Last edited by cheesefries at Feb 19, 2014,
#15
By better it means in terms of strength? or tone quality? I really love the kind of raw sound played through 1960 that's why i try build one as close to the spec as possible. Unloaded 1960, that's a great idea but it is impossible to get one cheap due to the shipping fee for this humongous box that weight a ton
#16
Sir dspellman excuse me for asking question about your answer again, is that OKAY for me to joint 2 parts of wood to make it wider? Let's say I couldn't find the hardwood piece wide enough to make it a 14" deep cab instead have 2 parts of 8", I request the sawmill join the 2 parts to make it somewhere around 14 or 15 width so i can make the cab deeper. Will it penalize the tone? Thanks