#1
Hello everyone!

Danny here again and I have a question related to performance.

I've always struggled with my technique over other subjects. Although I can learn the notes of a song relatively quickly, I have problems when it comes to playing the actual song. If I were to focus on the song completely 100% then I may be able to play it maybe 90% accurate. However when you're performing you don't have the luxury of being able to focus 100% on your instrument. There's a full crowd of people and the mind tends to wander about all the different things going on.

These are my questions.

How does one master a song so that it is effortless?

How does one master a song so that they can play it 100% accurately?

When I play guitar it's easier to make mistakes and get away with it. However awhile back I tried learning a song on piano and I have to say that I find the piano a lot harder to play accurately. The minute I make one mistake it seems like everything just falls apart where as on guitar if I made a mistake I could potentially recover.

What do you guys think of this?
#2
You need to learn the song at a slower bpm.
Build it into your muscle memory and you'll play it without any mental effort.

You need to probably play the song at a slower rate until you can build up to the actual bmp of the song.
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#3
As far as I see it, you won't be play even the easiest of songs up to a 100% of efficiency in terms of movement until your underlying base techniques are at a level that will similarly allow that efficiency in more complex songs.

Basically, a guitarist who practices adequately for 10 years will play an easy song more efficiently than one who practices adequately for 4 years, and by efficiency I mean minimizing movement and effort.

So, while you may not be capable of playing the song completely efficiently, you may through repetition and memorization get it up to a level that is sufficiently comfortable for you not to pay much attention to it.

Pay active attention to when you are practicing the song and determine which way of playing is most efficient, however, when playing- pay passive attention to your playing- you are aware of how and what you're playing, but in this case your fingers are repeating the pattern that you memorized during practice, instead of you being conscious of your finger control.
#4
The way I see it is if you are to be learning songs to play live, you need to be able to play them at a level where you don't even think about it which just comes with practice. When you see bands play songs 'effortlessly' live, that is most likely the case. Of course, having written the songs yourself helps but it can still be done with other peoples songs easily enough with practice.
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#5
It's all about repeating song for hundreds of times. On my first gig, I didn't even think about what I was playing, I was in the heat of the moment, and I made many mistakes on the song I learned only a week earlier, but I played flawlessly the song I loved and learned long time earlier.
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#6
Metronome and practice, use guitar pro for learning songs. Improve your technique? I don't know, for me if i practice something a lot i get better at it... and eventually can play it perfectly. My biggest problems on stage were sweaty hands (or cold hands) and it severely affected my playing, not nerves either it was always the temperature. Great example, i've been learning the solo to "Breeze" by Bulb, 2 weeks ago i could play it at 50% speed, now i can play it at 80-85% speed, all because i've been playing it like mad, there isn't any other way to learn than to let your neural pathways memorize the notes.
Last edited by maowcat at Feb 13, 2014,
#7
Hey bud,

Biggest thing is to record yourself playing through tunes so you can listen back and critique yourself. When you hear a mistake, pause the tape and play just that handful of notes that tripped you up repeatedly for at least a few minutes straight, then try adding the notes before and after the phrase in question until you are repeating the whole riff, then practice it as a whole for a few more minutes.

Resume play, rinse and repeat til you get to the end of your recording, then make a new recording and start all over again. You'd be surprised to see the difference between the first take and the second take.
#8
Just takes time. Dig into songs and do more than learn them, really pick apart even the most basic parts and make sure your technique is perfect. Practice little parts so you understand the phrases, instead of just knowing the notes/chords.
#10
FIrst of all, 100% accuracy doesn't exist in rock music.

The guys who get close to 100% accuracy? Maybe classical musicians. Do you see how hard those guys work?

Second, 100% accuracy largely doesn't matter because if you're performing well, the audience won't notice. It's mind-boggling the size of a mistake you can make and the audience will have no clue. The better a musician you become, the more of these you'll start to notice when you see other bands - but also notice that most of the audience DOESN'T notice.

Basically, you have to do what everyone says about breaking songs down into their component parts, getting them as perfect as you can in practice, and then when it comes time to perform you just play and trust that your body knows what to do.
#11
If you want to perform live...dont write difficult parts sitting down.lol

Sometimes the live stuff sounds better than the recorded stuff.

There's no way for you to sound exaclty like waht you recorded simply becuase
of acoustic. Sound wave bounces off of everything different.

As far as writiing my own music or solo . Ive probably played it a thousand times
with a hundred different veriiation.

I think after a while...you get tired or bored of wanting to make sound the same everytime,
all the time. So you veriations of it. If you just play and have fun, it's going to sound
good cuase you're in the zone.
#12
Quote by dannydawiz


How does one master a song so that it is effortless?


Play a lot…. .don't worry about it….. let it happen naturally.


Quote by dannydawiz

How does one master a song so that they can play it 100% accurately?


Don't think in terms of "mastering" … or "%100". You're over thinking it and setting yourself up to fail.

If you just play often, you'll get better at the material. You'll become more and more consistent, and as a result more confident.


Quote by dannydawiz


When I play guitar it's easier to make mistakes and get away with it. However awhile back I tried learning a song on piano and I have to say that I find the piano a lot harder to play accurately. The minute I make one mistake it seems like everything just falls apart where as on guitar if I made a mistake I could potentially recover.

What do you guys think of this?


Don't think in terms of "making mistakes" or "getting away with it".
just play!

Sometimes we're our own worst enemy, impeding our progress by over thinking and trying to live up to unrealistic expectations.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 14, 2014,
#13
When performing, you have to make an assessment. Are you playing outwardly towards others, or inwardly for yourself, and bringing those who are interested, in?

To me, performing is a sum total experience. It's execution, yes, that's just part of it. It's connection, relating, communication, understanding the audience, and being able to adapt to the group pesonality. In that context, a technique error here and there is probably not noticed at all, especially by those I am entertaining.

There's something to be said about playing within your means, however. You need to have a reasonable command over the material you do, or your execution can detract. Once you have that, the slip here and there is only as important to me as my overall goals...and when it's performing, its about the fullness of connecting with people, so it's of some weight, but not a big deal.

Best,

Sean