#2
Exercises on their own is really not going to do anything. Most of the time bad techniques has to do with bad execution or bad practicing.

For developing your alternate picking you want to make sure you are constantly doing down/up strokes, and that they are as close to the same level in dynamics as possible. Then you want to make sure when you practice alternate picking that you start at a slow tempo and focus on playing it with your entire body being relaxed, and that you are playing accurately and cleanly. What you are doing is building muscle memory, your brain needs to program how you move your fingers and hands together so it will be better at executing it later on.

The best exercises is actual music you like that uses the technique you are aiming at developing. Exercises is good if you find one small area that needs adjustments but in this case i believe you only need to slow down (and i mean really slow down) and make sure you are doing it perfectly at a slower speed for a while, then move up, make it perfect there, and so on.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
This is what Ive done. I got this suggestion from a shread book.

It's simple physic. The harder I pick. The more force it's going to require to counter that motion. It'll slow me down pr throw my timing off.
With the counter force being aplied in that direction, it'll require more force to counter that motion.

The stiffer I hold the pick..the more force it's also going to be required to press
the pick through the strings. The pick needs to flex.
My pick sits an angle for tone and this reason. The more pick surface
the hits the strings...the more force is require.

Play gently...especailly if you're on an electric.

For metal guitar solos that's going to require a beautiful warm not dirty distorted sound.
I use cabinet emulators
I use a Noise Gate. It allows me to use a tubedriver or add more gain.
I need gain or power. I dont even have to pick the notes to make it play.
If i barely touch the strings it'll make a note. The noise gate acts like a sort of mute.
This way i can just gently strum, pick or even flick the string if I want.
It's as if Im playing a clean guitar with plenty of sustain if i hold the stings down.

If anything I go semi legato. Just pick one note and hammer and pull the rest.
I miss the FX clicking sound of the pick so i pick the notes.
it's your fretboard hand that's going to generate speed.lol

It's complete silent if I dont touch the string or mute it.

The only other FX I use is a reverb set at 5%. it just soften the tone a little.
There's no echo

I run everything throug my PC with a vst host as a processor. Then into my practice amp
set on dry...
It's night and day if I was to just use the amp without the guitar amp emulators or noise gate.
Last edited by smc818 at Feb 14, 2014,
#4
Quote by smc818
*stuff*


... That is the opposite of helpful.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
... That is the opposite of helpful.


well you're no help at all...

Dont pick the notes so hard. it's not rocket science. Let the amp do it's work.
It's like if you slam on the gas throttle harder thinkig it's going to
go faster, in your brain it might feel like it but mechanically and physically
it's aint happening.

Thats what most newbies wanna do...is play fast because it's one of those
thing you gatta prove.
Ive been playing for alomost 40 years. I can play plenty fast, So what
I do know what works for me and what dosnt.

Trust me...the clicking nosie wasnt a complain from me. It's from people
that listen to my music. Im used to the clicking sound...they're not.

Alternate picking is sippose to be econamical...if it aint, then you might as
well pick it whatever way that's comfortible to you.
PLAY THE GUITAR...dont let it play you.

Alot of it has to do with your fret board fingers getting mix up during
transitions.
#6
Quote by NaturalBlues6
Could you please give me some cool exercises to do alternate picking? thanks

Make up your own. As long as you are using a metronome.
#7
Quote by Sickz
Exercises on their own is really not going to do anything. Most of the time bad techniques has to do with bad execution or bad practicing.

For developing your alternate picking you want to make sure you are constantly doing down/up strokes, and that they are as close to the same level in dynamics as possible. Then you want to make sure when you practice alternate picking that you start at a slow tempo and focus on playing it with your entire body being relaxed, and that you are playing accurately and cleanly. What you are doing is building muscle memory, your brain needs to program how you move your fingers and hands together so it will be better at executing it later on.

The best exercises is actual music you like that uses the technique you are aiming at developing. Exercises is good if you find one small area that needs adjustments but in this case i believe you only need to slow down (and i mean really slow down) and make sure you are doing it perfectly at a slower speed for a while, then move up, make it perfect there, and so on.


What this guy said. Practice, and practice what you like.
#8
An exersice you might want to look into is the spider exersice. If you don't know what that consists of, essentially it involves playing 4 semitones on each string e.g. play 1st fret, 2nd fret, 3rd fret, 4th fret on the 6th string, then repeat that sequence when going up higher strings.

If you want to find out more about this exersice just search on the internet for it. There's loads of variations on the exersice.
Last edited by 6metal6legend6 at Feb 14, 2014,
#9
Quote by smc818
well you're no help at all...

Dont pick the notes so hard. it's not rocket science. Let the amp do it's work.
It's like if you slam on the gas throttle harder thinkig it's going to
go faster, in your brain it might feel like it but mechanically and physically
it's aint happening.

Thats what most newbies wanna do...is play fast because it's one of those
thing you gatta prove.
Ive been playing for alomost 40 years. I can play plenty fast, So what
I do know what works for me and what dosnt.

Trust me...the clicking nosie wasnt a complain from me. It's from people
that listen to my music. Im used to the clicking sound...they're not.

Alternate picking is sippose to be econamical...if it aint, then you might as
well pick it whatever way that's comfortible to you.
PLAY THE GUITAR...dont let it play you.

Alot of it has to do with your fret board fingers getting mix up during
transitions.

The problem is that in amongst a couple of admittedly usefull bits of information you also posted a load of irrelevant rambling that doesn't address the threadstarters question at all.

He asked about alternate picking, why did you feel the need to start talking about cabinet emulators?
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
Yeah, that was some horrible advice.

Really, just make sure your technique is correct. Watch some video's by Paul Gilbert or Guthrie Govan on alt picking and you're pretty much good to go. Speed comes with time, so don't rush things.
baab
Last edited by My Last Words at Feb 15, 2014,
#11
Quote by steven seagull
The problem is that in amongst a couple of admittedly usefull bits of information you also posted a load of irrelevant rambling that doesn't address the threadstarters question at all.

He asked about alternate picking, why did you feel the need to start talking about cabinet emulators?



Well...it's just your opinion...

Picking off a of dry isn't going to help you pick a wet guitar better.
That's like practicing driving street car when you wanna race in the baja500.
Set up your equipment properly so it can work properly for the job it's intended
to do...so don't get silly with me.

A common mistakes most people or rookies will make is to practice picking
on an acoustic thinking when they transfer to an electric it'll going to get better.
All they're doing is conditioning themselves to pick and strum harder.
Same goes when you pick a dry electric guitar.
#12
Did you even read the original question?
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#13
Im pretty sure most off road 4x4 has special type of shocks.

What do you think schotty rectifier or inductors are use for?
#14
Stop acting like such a child please
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#15
I'm positive the extra jack with the -bd on my expensive amp has capacitor, diodes or inductors
wired to the input jack. What it dose is filters out spikes or hot signal if I use a hot pickup.

Why? because I can pick the damn super hot and still have a nice clean warm distortion
without the hizz. Im picking clean already. it's the signals that has to get filtered.

Why? because if it sounds dirty, I might have a fault notion Im picking it wrong
and sound like crap....

Why is that?? because every time you strike a string it's going to create a spike
in the signal. if you're alternate picking or picking lots of note. You'll creating more spikes and clicking sound from the pick. The pick up is just a mic. Yell in it sometimes.
Last edited by smc818 at Feb 16, 2014,
#16
Quote by smc818

A common mistakes most people or rookies will make is to practice picking
on an acoustic thinking when they transfer to an electric it'll going to get better.
All they're doing is conditioning themselves to pick and strum harder.
Same goes when you pick a dry electric guitar.


Well this is just flat out nonsense. Practicing picking on a acoustic guitar is totally viable and if you practice as you should it can be very beneficial. Hell, i met Bireli Lagrene after one of his gigs and he said specifically that he would often practice all of his picking oriented stuff on acoustic, even if it was intended for electric later on. And you can´t really argue with the man, he´s one of the best gypsy jazz players around and he really get those accents out regardless if he is playing electric or acoustic.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#17
It's not nonsense. It's probably beyond your sense, for a lack of better your common sense term. lmao

You assume the TS is a total newbie at playing guitar. He can probably alternate pick
at decent speed. He's looking to improve his speed.

You still perceive dry signal as clean signals.

Some people practice going into whatever heck recording software.

You wont noitce lantency issues until you start doing alternative picking or picking
notes at a higher rate. It'll throw off your timing.
Even if sound okay with everything else. It'll sound fine at 16 ms or even at 10ms
Last edited by smc818 at Feb 16, 2014,
#18
Ok time out time
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com