#1
Hi guys, I just bought a warbeast from my friend for a hundred bucks and you can tell it hasn't been used in a while, the frets are completely oxidized and so is the output jack, anything specific I should be using/avoiding when cleaning them? and is there anything else I should take a look at on the guitar during cleaning? It's my first electric. Thank ahead

P.s. when I have the guitar plugged in I can hear static in the background even when I'm not playing but it seems to go away when I mute the strings, is that normal or should I be looking into it?
Last edited by JustANihilist at Feb 15, 2014,
#2
what type of static do you hear? Like the noise from AC electric stuff or lights creating hum with the pickups?

For the frets, you can probably can use steel wool (very fine gauge) to remove the oxide. Don't let the steel wool scratch the fretboard though. They have a template thing you can buy that is a piece of metal with a cutout in the middle the size of a fret (that protects the wood around the fret). You might be able to improvise something similar. Also, I'd recommend keeping a towel or something over the pickups while you do this. Steel wool will shed some metal strands and they'll build up on the magnets of your pickups if you're not careful (don't ask how I happen to know this ).

For the output jack, maybe the same thing - if you can get at the insides, clean them up with steel wool and avoid getting metal pieces around (especially inside the electrical compartment). Just putting a plug in and out several times often wears away the oxide where you need the metal to make contact anyways.
#3
Thanks, it's a high pitched kinda screech, with a crackle every second or so. Like the ringing you get in your ears once in a while...or is that just me
#5
That's odd - those crackles and screeches are normally problems with the amp, not the guitar. There are some loud cracks you can get from a bad cable too. If it's specific to one pickup, maybe it's a similar connection problem with the internal wires. You might try lightly tapping the guitar to see if it seems to respond to the tapping. Or holding the guitar in different orientations to see if it correlates. If so, just check the wires. It could be the pickup wire is barely connected, or the ground wire braid on the pickup wire is shorting to the internal wire.