#1
Hi guys,

Hope this is the correct section for a question like this. If not, mods please help me out.
So I'm reasonably beginner, and I'm learning the Ryan Bingham song The Weary Kind, using this tab sheet

http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/r/ryan_bingham/the_weary_kind_ver3_crd.htm

And this video as reference.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=soGNAEg1zps

I'm having a little bit of trouble reading the tabs though. At the end of the Chorus he plays the A9sus4 with a slide down the neck two frets, followed by a slide back to the A9sus4. My problem is that when I try to look up the A9sus4 there's a very varied number of versions of the chord. I was hoping somebody with an eagle eye would be able to help me figure out exactly what the chord is and how to play it? I can tell it's obviously not as simple as just the A7.
#2
Quote by Sarnecki
...[ ]....I'm having a little bit of trouble reading the tabs though. At the end of the Chorus he plays the A9sus4 with a slide down the neck two frets, followed by a slide back to the A9sus4. My problem is that when I try to look up the A9sus4 there's a very varied number of versions of the chord. I was hoping somebody with an eagle eye would be able to help me figure out exactly what the chord is and how to play it? I can tell it's obviously not as simple as just the A7.
This probably is in the wrong place, but I'll try to help you the little I can.

Try using simple theory, and build the chord yourself.

Starting with an A major chord, the sus4 note is a D, and the 9th is a B.

In truth you can form Asus4add9, by playing ALL the strings on the guitar open (!), save for fingering the 2nd fret of the G-3 string. That note is A, and well, it's the root.

The 9th is the B-2 string open, and the sus4, would be the D-4 string open

You could also add the 9th in the bass by playing Asus4, while holding the 2nd fret of the A-5 string. That could be written as, "Asus4/B". (a "slash" chord)

At some point you're going to have to decide which "voice", "shape", or "inversion", (call it what you will), works best for you. Whether it's the sound, or a simple decision of mechanics, that physically helps blend the chord into the rest of the song, by eliminating excess movement.

Since you're talking in terms of "sliding down two frets", Asus4add9 is formed at the 5th fret, based in an A major barre chord. You should know how to suspend that, and the 9th would be added with the pinky placed on the 7th fret, e-1 string. (that note is a B, the add9).

Keep in mind that it would be easiest to play only the top 4 strings with that fingering. It would be reasonably difficult to develop the chord trying to use a grand barre and playing all 6 strings.

You mentioned "A7". From the open position, A7 (A dominant 7th, which adds G natural to A major) can be played with three different placements of the 7th. 1: On the High e-1 string @ 3rd fret. 2: with the G-3 string played open, and lastly, with the G in the bass, 3rd fret of E-6. Here again, personal taste, and melodic or bass line function, will determine which voice you should use.

I hope that helps more than it confuses you....

I'd also consider trying this out in either "Tab Talk", or "Musician's talk", but that's a bonafide jungle over in "Musician's", which sometimes requires a bit of thick skin to cope.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 17, 2014,
#3
Haha well that was certainly a LOT more information than I expected, but I am extremely grateful. I'll start parsing this right away. To be honest you can see the chord pretty clearly in closeup in that video I posted at the 3:00 mark, and to me it just looks like the A7 chord. It isn't sounding right to my ear though.
#4
Quote by Sarnecki
Haha well that was certainly a LOT more information than I expected, but I am extremely grateful. I'll start parsing this right away. To be honest you can see the chord pretty clearly in closeup in that video I posted at the 3:00 mark, and to me it just looks like the A7 chord. It isn't sounding right to my ear though.
A lot of times, a player might be simply lifting one finger, and/or hammering down another while strumming through an open chord. You might be working a couple of notes of the melody into the strumming pattern.

In any event, music theory forces us to be able to name the chords formed by those passing notes.

One very clear example of this is the chorus in "Stairway to Heaven". People tab it out, with C's and D's & G's and add this, suspend this, subtract that. It looks like a major project. But the truth is, Jimmy Page is just strumming through some open chords with his 12 string, and picking up a finger here, and setting down another over there.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 17, 2014,