#1
Playing by tab is using numbers to tell you where to put your fingers.

Unless you have a background in reading music and classical guitar, you might not even know what notes you are playing!

Is there any blues method book or blues book that isn't just tablature, so we can also know what the notes are?
#2
There are many many books on playing blues with regular music notation (amazon has several and I have some in my music library if you still don't find what you're looking for). I'm not sure what your complaint about TAB is. Most complain that it doesn't have accurate note durations shown. But if you memorized the string and fret positions, you would know the note names you're playing, no?
#3
Quote by timbo63
There are many many books on playing blues with regular music notation (amazon has several and I have some in my music library if you still don't find what you're looking for). I'm not sure what your complaint about TAB is. Most complain that it doesn't have accurate note durations shown. But if you memorized the string and fret positions, you would know the note names you're playing, no?


Yeah, you're right, but I'm a beginner
#4
What type of blues are you hoping to play? Are you looking for songs or general technique? Old stuff (like Robert Johnson) or the new stuff out there. That might help folks offer suggestions...
#6
The Hal Leonard published book of Robert Johnson's songs is complete and accurate and includes standard + TAB. I see it called "New Transcriptions" on amazon.com (looks the same as my old book). If you want to play along, it's a good book. Unfortunately, you'll need to use several tunings (and tune off standard pitch). I got a lot out of it and it was good to study Robert Johnson's approach (and maybe contrast it with later song versions from Eric Clapton for example). So it's good for checking out rock's roots. The combined bass and solo accompaniment for solo guitar is pretty cool. But it's not going to offer much that can directly be used on more modern music or to understand blues in general. However, if you want to hear someone really convince you he's blue, it's a good place to start.
#7
Get a program like TuxGuitar or Guitar Pro, it shows both the tab and music notation. You can also tab out things you like playing and see them in music notation, and vice versa.
#8
Kind of a dumb question, but did Robert Johnson use a fingerpicking classical style or did he use a guitar picking style (playing with a pick)?
#10
I'm pretty sure that Robert Johnson used finger picking. I don't know if I'd call it "classical". If there is anything particular about classical picking (proper placement of fingers, feet, posture, etc), I'd assume that Robert Johnson didn't do it But seriously, the style has some nice bass note patterns with chords and melody developed on the higher notes. I always use finger picking to recreate those songs, but I otherwise mostly play with a pick. It's good to be fluent with both.