#1
So i want to write a song, but the chords i'm using I can't seem to find a key signature to fit them and I don't even know what kind of chords they are.

For the "chorus" I have these chords, I'll give you the note names from 5th string to 1st string

This is in standard tuning 6th and 1st string aren't used in any of these chords

First chord: C, F#,G,D
Second chord: D, F#,G,D
Third Chord: E, G,G,Gb (slides out to octave G)
Fourth Chord: F#,A,G,A

I built these chords with the help of a friend one day and I NEED to figure out how to build more! But first I need to figure out what kind of chords they are and the appropriate key signature!


If i spelled these right, they should sound dissonant and emotional. I LIVE for chords like this so I need to figure out how to build more!

thanks for your time!!
#3
Quote by McZaxon

This is in standard tuning 6th and 1st string aren't used in any of these chords

First chord: C, F#,G,D
Second chord: D, F#,G,D
Third Chord: E, G,G,Gb (slides out to octave G)
Fourth Chord: F#,A,G,A

I built these chords with the help of a friend one day and I NEED to figure out how to build more! But first I need to figure out what kind of chords they are and the appropriate key signature!


If i spelled these right, they should sound dissonant and emotional. I LIVE for chords like this so I need to figure out how to build more!

thanks for your time!!


In all honesty I'm not sure what to call your chords. They're all very dissonant, to my ear, and with strange chords like this I'm not really too sure how to name them, however I can give you the formula for each of them, so if you want to make similar chords you can...I guess?:
First chord is (1-#4/b5-5-2) I have no idea about this one as a chord.
Second is (1-3-4-1) Seems like it would be a major 11th chord with no 5th or 7th, but from what I know it isn't called that unless there's a 7th, so one of the long-time musos will probably explain this better.
Third is (1-b3-b3-2) minor 9th? Above comment applies.
Last one is (1-b3-b2-b3) which is minor, but with a b9.

If I'm honest I'm not sure how you'd work those into a listenable piece?
Last edited by AeonOptic at Feb 23, 2014,
#4
There really isn't a key center that I can tell as there is no strong cadence. All the chords are very dissonant.
#5
I wouldn't say they sound that dissonant. They actually sound really cool. The first chord sounds like Cadd9add#11 (or Cmaj9#11 without the maj7 and third) - IMO functions as a C major chord rather than a D chord with a C in bass. So it's some kind of a C major chord. On it's own it has that kind of "lydian sound". It's actually used in some Whitesnake songs from their 1987 album (for example "Looking for Love"). The next chord is a pretty commonly used (at least our band's guitarist uses it and you can also find it in some Whitesnake songs from the 1987 album). It's Dadd11. The next chord sounds like Emadd9. There's no fifth but it doesn't matter and doesn't really change the sound. The next chord sounds like Dadd11/F# to me. It doesn't have the root note but it still sounds like D major to me in this context.

I can tab the chords if TS's chords seemed confusing. They do sound pretty cool if voiced correctly and played with a clean tone and preferably arpeggiated.

1st chord x 3 4 0 3 x, 2nd chord x 5 4 0 3 x, 3rd chord x 7 5 0 7 x, 4th chord x 9 7 0 10 x.

Sounds like G major to me. If played in this order, it sounds like it's going up towards G major chord (that would be the next chord). It has that ascending bassline (C, D, E, F#) that wants to go to G. Also the open G string in every chord makes it feel like G major.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 23, 2014,
#6
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I wouldn't say they sound that dissonant. They actually sound really cool.
They do sound pretty cool if voiced correctly and played with a clean tone and preferably arpeggiated.

Playing it back again acoustically I see that now, sounds a lot nicer. My amp was slightly driven so it did sound to me wildly dissonant but maybe that's just me.
#7
D/C, D, Em, D/F# with a tonic pedal throughout.

if you want to be able to reliably create chords like this you need to understand basic voicing principles and techniques. that's where you're going to want to start.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#8
Quote by McZaxon
So i want to write a song, but the chords i'm using I can't seem to find a key signature to fit them and I don't even know what kind of chords they are.

For the "chorus" I have these chords, I'll give you the note names from 5th string to 1st string

This is in standard tuning 6th and 1st string aren't used in any of these chords

First chord: C, F#,G,D
Second chord: D, F#,G,D
Third Chord: E, G,G,Gb (slides out to octave G)
Fourth Chord: F#,A,G,A

I built these chords with the help of a friend one day and I NEED to figure out how to build more! But first I need to figure out what kind of chords they are and the appropriate key signature!


If i spelled these right, they should sound dissonant and emotional. I LIVE for chords like this so I need to figure out how to build more!

thanks for your time!!


1st chord: D dominant 11 with no 5th. The dissonance comes from the chord's 3rd and 4th being a half step away. raise the G to G# and you'll have a nice jazzy D7(#11) chord.

2nd chord: Dmaj(add4). F# and G dissonance. The 4 is commonly raised a step to a Dma(#11)

3rd chord: E minor(add9) then to a regular Eminor.

4th chord: F# minor add G or most likely a Gmaj9sus(no 5th)

V-V-vi-I in G.
#9
Quote by AeolianWolf
D/C, D, Em, D/F# with a tonic pedal throughout.

if you want to be able to reliably create chords like this you need to understand basic voicing principles and techniques. that's where you're going to want to start.

The tonic pedal is the G?
#10
Quote by macashmack
The tonic pedal is the G?


that's how it's hitting my ears, yes.

Quote by Deadds
1st chord: D dominant 11 with no 5th. The dissonance comes from the chord's 3rd and 4th being a half step away. raise the G to G# and you'll have a nice jazzy D7(#11) chord.

2nd chord: Dmaj(add4). F# and G dissonance. The 4 is commonly raised a step to a Dma(#11)

3rd chord: E minor(add9) then to a regular Eminor.

4th chord: F# minor add G or most likely a Gmaj9sus(no 5th)

V-V-vi-I in G.


did you play it? you need to give consideration to chord function. the last chord has a dominant function, meaning it could be interpreted as a viiº or a V. i chose to view it as a V in first inversion, but it really could go either way.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
that's how it's hitting my ears, yes.


did you play it? you need to give consideration to chord function. the last chord has a dominant function, meaning it could be interpreted as a viiº or a V. i chose to view it as a V in first inversion, but it really could go either way.


no didn't play it. i just did a quick read, but i guess the notes names also represent the way they were played.

vii can work but having Ti and Do in the same chord makes it had to ignore it as a I chord.
#12
Quote by Deadds
no didn't play it. i just did a quick read, but i guess the notes names also represent the way they were played.

vii can work but having Ti and Do in the same chord makes it had to ignore it as a I chord.


it doesn't resolve, which indicates that it isn't a I chord. the G is just a tonic pedal that serves to ground the whole thing. not to mention that, while the absence of the fifth is easily accounted for, the absence of the third indicates pretty clearly to me that it isn't a tonic chord.

if the lower A in the final chord were changed to a B (or Bb), it would be a very different discussion.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#13
Hey McZaxon, I think your concept is awesome!!!

I agree twith MaggaraMarine!

G Major (E minor) is the Key: g-a-b-(C-D-E)-f#

BUT

I think that kind_ of confuse's things for what you are trying to achieve
which (I believe) is trying to compose around that C-D-E-D(F#) chord progression
whilst maintaining (keeping) the F#/G theme, well at least for starters anyhow.

C Lydian mode might also be a solution to home Key: (C-D-E)-f#-g-a-b
but you'll have to ask someone else here to expand on that, as I might put ya wrong if I tried.

and just a suggestion, but you might consider keeping the F#/G thing solely as a verse or chorus section (just as long as it stands out as a dominant feature), so you could break away from it elsewhere to really allow more freedom with composing..?

nonetheless:

Here are some chords I came up with (within reason) keeping to the F#/G theme you have going, that you asked for.
(Maybe someone else might help name any that may be of interest to you.)
Hint: Ask MaggaraMarine!

hopefully this might prompt some of the other guru's here to help really expand on some clever voicings and ideas you might wanna work onetc...

Sorry I couldn't be of more help!


[font="Courier New"]
in no particular order...

e -x-x-x-x---x-x---x-x-x
B -7-7-5-3---5-3---3-3-3
G -0-0-0-0---0-0---0-0-0
D -5-4-4-4---4-4---4-2-0
A -x-x-x-x---x-x---x-x-x
E -5-5-5-5---3-3---2-2-2	

e -x----x-----x----x
B -12---0-----10---8
G -0---(12)---0----0
D -0----0-----0----0
A -9----9-----9----9
E -10---10----10---10

e -x----x
B -x----8
G -11---0
D -0----0
A -10---9
E -12---8[/FONT]

Hope it Helps!

P.S sounds a bit like the old classic Em - D - C - D type progression but in reverse (so to speak)... but with a cool twist on it!

..and if it's not too re-tard-ed of me to add...
the chords (both yours and mine) all seem to have a kind of "add9/sus2nd" kinda feel (ambient/emotional) to them so maybe research the nature of those sort of chords for some answers?


[font="Courier New"]...Cadd9...Dsus2nd...Emadd9...etc
e -0-------0---------2------
B -3-------3---------0------
G -0-------2---------0------
D -2-------0---------2------
A -3-------x---------4------
E -x-------x---------0------[/FONT]
Last edited by tonibet72 at Feb 24, 2014,
#14
Quote by MaggaraMarine


1st chord x 3 4 0 3 x, 2nd chord x 5 4 0 3 x, 3rd chord x 7 5 0 7 x, 4th chord x 9 7 0 10 x.

Sounds like G major to me. If played in this order, it sounds like it's going up towards G major chord (that would be the next chord). It has that ascending bassline (C, D, E, F#) that wants to go to G. Also the open G string in every chord makes it feel like G major.


The tabs you have are spot on. That's exactly how I play them. It sounds like i've been using a lot of suspended chords and add chords. Which I had thought of, but never really knew exactly how to build those. Thank you for analyzing these chords!

The only thing is that when I play these chords in the context with the chorus I wrote with them, I pick them, or fingerpick them. when going up (I'm still working on a solid pattern) I start from the bottom and pick each individual note in a random order for now. When descending, i start from the first couple of strings and pick in a descending order, coming all the way back down to the D chord, resolving the bass note to the E.

I never really thought about resolving it to the G. But i'll give it a try.
#15
Thank you for your input tonibet72!

Yes, i'll probably stay away from the F#/G for any verses I decide to come up with. I think i'm going to use this as some sort of verse or chorus!

Thanks for the additional chords! I will begin using them right away. And thanks for giving me some keys to try. I really appreciate it.
Last edited by McZaxon at Mar 8, 2014,