#1
note: dont be harsh on the newbie.

Okay I'm kinda excited now. I've been working on playing first two shapes of minor pentatonic for a week or two now and I pretty got the grasp of it. For the first time of my life I did open a random a minor backing song and played, or tried to jam along to it. Eventhough I didnt create a masterpiece I LOVED how jamming along feels.

I used to try playing covers to songs I like but this seems REALLY fun and amazing for me. Someone who didnt really create in his life in terms of arts . So what are your tips? Want are crucial points and MUST(!!!!) learn first of jamming and improvising.

Thanks alot for your tips!
#2
Jam away man, backing tracks are great for honing your chops. Play along with others also to discover new ideas.
#3
Quote by Cajundaddy
Jam away man, backing tracks are great for honing your chops. Play along with others also to discover new ideas.


How do I get to know which notes fit better with which chord progression etc? Where do I have to begin learning the art of getting the notes togather!!!
#4
Well... there is a reason I rarely teach guitar cause I stink at it but... every chord in a song has a group of notes (1-3-5-7) and soloing over a chord within those notes always works. David Gilmour does this a lot. Most of the pentatonic scale will work over a typical relative chord progression in that key so those are safe notes but some will sound better than others depending on where you are in the changes. Certain notes will create tension, a feeling of sadness, anticipation, happiness, or resolve tension. Learning when to use certain notes comes from experience and playng along with others to understand why they make the choices they do.

Clear as mud? I know...

Pick a player or solo you like that is reasonably within your technical ability and play along with them. See where they go and more importantly seek to understand why they go there. The greatest solo work is often not the fastest or most difficult, but the one that best connects with the song and the listener.

Now go play sumthin'.
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Feb 18, 2014,
#5
Listen. More.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
Okay so I guess first consensus is to know how every fret feels. Also I have to learn basic chord progressions(?) Listen alot of solos and see how it stars, devolopts and ends.
#7
Quote by arcanom
Okay so I guess first consensus is to know how every fret feels. Also I have to learn basic chord progressions(?) Listen alot of solos and see how it stars, devolopts and ends.


I meant to everything. Your playing, the backing, other people's solos, other instruments, sounds out there in the world, everything.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#8
Just play it...

Here's a video of me playin' to a backing track..

The more you play, the more tricks you put in your bag..

Have a Blast!!!

Video here
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#9
I would learn how chords are built up (if you didn't already) and also try to learn other people's solos. :-)
#10
Jamming to a backing track is one of my very favorite things to do, and it's a great way to learn and practice scales. One really fun method is try the "Session Mode" on the game Rocksmith 2014 - you can set up a dynamic "band" that adjusts to your style of playing, and they display the scales on the screen to help you stay in the proper key. It even lets you know if you hit a sour note. Excellent tool for beginner/intermediate players.
#11
To get more melodic lines, pick apart the chords and try to use each chord's notes as the foundation of the melody. WHen playing over C major, you'd base your melodies on the notes in the C chord, and when it moves to F, you'd use notes from the F chord.

Work out melodies your ears and guitar. Always try to get it by ear before you look something up. Even stupid nursery rhyme melodies are good for grasping basic scale/arpeggio sounds.

And also listen to music and learn your favorite melodies. Analyze the melodies to see how they overlap with the chords. Study the rhythms. Play licks in different keys.
#12
The best advice I can give is to always land on a note in your scale that compliments the chord being played. For example if an A minor chord is played you are most likely going to be landing on an A C or E as the chord is played.
#13
Excellent stuff. Learning is a wonderful feeling and the guitar, while it can be played by everyone is not something everyone can play well.

The more scales you learn and how they interact, the better.
And learn to hear and see the frets as intervals.
#14
I think I have some useful advice for you. If I understand you correctly, you just play over minor backing tracks using the minor pentatonic scale. It's def a good way to start, but in the future you might want to expand that.

- A good way to improve is to record yourself while improvising. In the beginning you will probably not like it, it's a bit of a confrontation. However, by listening to what you've played, you will discover what sounded great and why, and what not. If you use the phrase you liked again, you will have something new to your arsenal.

- Don't play to many notes. Most people, certainly in the beginnen, want to play to many notes. The problem is that because of the higher number of notes, you will eventually hit a strong note. But by doing that, you are playing a bunch of notes that didn't sound as strong at the other. try to start with playing a limit number of notes and aim for the strong notes. A good way of practising that would be to play some kind of Santana style backing track.

- Expand your scales. A lot of songs are not in pure major (ionian) or pure minor (aeolian). There are also modes like Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian and Locrian.

- Just play guitar. I read things about learning solo's etc. That's good too, every new thing you learn you will be able to make it something of yourself. In solo's there are a lot of licks you can 'steal' or adjust. So just play a lot of guitar and you will develop your arsenal of licks and abilities.

- Get your bends in tune. Check regularly of your bends are in tune. If you look for 'Justin guitar bends' you will find a good exercise for that.

- Practise purposeful. With practising soloing or improvising it is often better to practise that for a longer amount of time. For example: in general it is better to practise it once every four days for 1h than 4 days of 15 minutes.

- PLAY, LISTEN, PLAY PLAY!

Good luck