#1
When I play the open low E and bend any string, the low E's pitch drops a semitone. Why is this happening? I screwed the trem down as flush to the body as i can (american strat).
#2
It doesn't matter ifyou screw down the tremolo, if it moves when you bend a string you may have to add a spring by opening the back of the guitar. It's easy enough to do it yourself, just add enough springs till the problem dissapears.
Note that the tremolo may be harder to use afterwards.
#3
This is how floating trems work -- you bend a string, the butt end of the trem comes up and all the rest of the strings go flat. The lower the spring tension, the more likely you're going to have this happen. Add a spring and it's more difficult to make the arse end of the trem rise, but it's also going to affect how easily your trem works when you WANT to use it. .

Wait, isn't that exactly what xander_c212 just said?
#4
The springs keep the overall tension equalized, so when you bend one string, the rest go a little flat. That's the nature of the beast. If you never want to use the trem, just block it.
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#6
Quote by RyanMW2010
Do I need to buy more springs?



Do you need to use the trem? If so, you can try that.

If not, block it (meaning literally put something, including a block of wood, to prevent it moving).
#7
Quote by dspellman
Do you need to use the trem? If so, you can try that.

If not, block it (meaning literally put something, including a block of wood, to prevent it moving).


Yes, I like using the trem from time to time. Where do I get more springs from though? Do I need to order them or get them from a music store? Or did extra springs come included somewhere and I'm just not remembering?
#8
Most Floyds come installed with three springs, but you can put up to five on there. You can also order them online, and there are some vendors that have stronger springs, etc. You can also pick some up from a tech.

Here's another thing -- a big brass sustain block upgrade will also sometimes help with this issue. The trem is still going to want to lift and push your low E string flat, but for a lot of us the solution lies in the speed with which we're on and off the bend or vibrato. The extra inertia of a heavier sustain block will make the trem a bit slower to react on its own, and you can sometimes be in and out of the bend/vibrato before the trem gets around to lifting.

And finally, there's a technique that I've done for years that works, but takes some practice. Eventually it becomes unconscious. I usually put the side of my picking hand palm on the trem and sort of hold it in place when I'm doing a largish bend. It's become so routine that I've largely forgotten I do it.