#1
I recently acquired a VVT X-40 Dumble style head that sounds incredible, but has no built in spring reverb tank. I have searched for options and found a gomez amplification g-spring in a '63 fender housing handwired by Dario, himself. i don't know the back story, but it is one of the last units he produced. does anyone have any experience with the g-spring reverb? i understand it is meticuliously hand crafted and sounds phenomenal. I would love some opinions. Once I take delivery. I will contact Dario and find out how the unit came into being. It is from '63 RI fender housing, completely gutted and replaced with the far superior, hand hired G-spring components. I hope it lives up to the billing. It is worth a fortune, since the RI is already $700 and G-spring (if you can find one, was discontinued, years, ago). It is quite a score, but does it sound any good? Anyone who has one or who has played through one, please feel free to comment on it. Thanks.
#2
I did a session with one and it sounded amazing. It's really rich and full.
Sadly, we ended up throwing the tracks out, and when I came back to record, I just used the reverb in my Matchless.
Sounded awesome the one time I played through one, though.
Awesome!
#3
Quote by sheaaa
I did a session with one and it sounded amazing. It's really rich and full.
Sadly, we ended up throwing the tracks out, and when I came back to record, I just used the reverb in my Matchless.
Sounded awesome the one time I played through one, though.


I recently heard a youtube comparison to the original vibroking to the g-spring and IMO, there was no comparison. It will arrive tomorrow. I am finally assembling a decent system. '08 G&L Comanche; Gomez g-spring in '63 housing; VVT X-40; and an Egnater 1X12 cab with a celestion 50W gold speaker. I can start doing a/b/c comparisons with my twins and modded DRRI to see if the sound is up to the billing. I have always wanted a complete, handwired, all analog set of amplification components and GASed for a Dumble (or even the two rock or Victoria clone), but I think I hit a sweet spot with this assembly of components. I can't wait to hear a proper reverb, the fender's are adequate, but nothing terribly exciting. The g-spring/VVT/Egnater/Celestion Gold alnico should rival amp combos costing thousands more (not that the components were cheap, by any stretch of the imagination).

Any others with g-spring experience?

I am trying to nail the Robben Ford tone with a little SRV edge. I actually got the Comanche when I heard the comparison with the John Mayer Fender and was blown away by the difference in tone with the former sounding close to the RF/SRV tone. I never, in a million years, though of purchasing a Comanche, but the guitar (with all its quirks, is capable of replicating a dynamic range of tones).

Having no particular allegiance to brands, I have hand selected each piece to complement my stable of amps and guitars with the specific intent to replicate that dumble tone, as I could never justify paying $80,000+ for an original dumble. I really believe a good reverb makes the difference between sounding good and sounding great, even if I am only wooing those who frequent my basement. I am simply amazed at the difference hand wired circuitry makes in a more faithful homage to the originals, but without worrying about reliability in purchasing a vintage piece. I have given up on restoration of originals, and far prefer to retrofit modern equipment.
#4
Quote by sheaaa
I did a session with one and it sounded amazing. It's really rich and full.
Sadly, we ended up throwing the tracks out, and when I came back to record, I just used the reverb in my Matchless.
Sounded awesome the one time I played through one, though.


Mine reverb arrived today and I am grossly understating that it is far beyond my expectations.

I rarely advocate that "vintage," is somehow synonymous with quality. Let's face it, much of what was in production back then was inferior goods, unworthy of adulation or imitation. With reverb, in particular, however, there appears no modern day substitute for the good old fashioned, tube driven, spring reverb pan. It can be debated, ad infinitum, the merits of the measurable sound characteristics, but, to my ears, this "hand wired," reverb head rejuvenates the universal teenage "quixotic" dream, that we would never grow up and we all would be rock stars.