#1
Do your guys fingers ever "split" between the nail and the skin on the tips of your fingers???

My get sore to the point where it HURTS really bad to bend the strings so I basically have to stop using that finger and it's really annoying.

I tend to pick at my fingers and bite them sometimes, I'm trying really goddamn hard to stop.

It's the part of the front of the nail by the tips of your fingers - in between the nail and the skin that almost "breaks" its seal and then becomes really sore and stuff.
#2
not normally, no.

are you using really heavy strings?
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#3
No, 9's....

I think it's because sometimes I pick at the skin on my fingers and between the nail and it weakens it


I really hate being a guitar player who tends to pick at his fingers, it ruins the chance to play sometimes!

I have a really bad fear that all the picking has swelled my fingers and made them fatter so it's harder to fret notes too!
#4
No, that happens to lots of people, including me. It was like as I push the string up to bend it, there is an opposite pulling force that pulls the pad of the fingertip away from the nail. It can hurt like hell, and once you injure it this way, you pretty much have to stop trying bends (with that finger) till it heals.

I read a lot on how to deal with this. From what I read, this will NOT get better over time. In other words, you will NOT build up a callous in that area right below the tip of the nail. It won't somehow affix itself stronger to the nail to avoid being pulled away in the future.

Some musicians -- particularly working professionals -- recommended stuff like putting superglue along the pad right next to the nail. Apparently this will be a short fix if you need to play a gig.

If you think about the physics of why this is happening, it generally seems more likely if you are doing the bend with the string on the flesh-side of your pad. In other words, place your hands palm-down on a table. Look at the tips of your fingers. The nail is the "roof" and the pad of the finger is the "wall", and then the flesh above your first knuckle is the "floor." As you push this "wall" into a string to bend it, if the string is really low -- really close to the "floor" -- it is more likely to pull the skin away from where it connects under your nail, tearing it away. If you can do a bend pressing the "wall" down into the fretboard BEFORE you worry about bending the string, then push into your end -- while still pushing down hard -- the string should catch the pad closer toward the "roof" or nail, and as you bend you may be less likely to tear the skin way from under the nail. So, basically, downward pressure into the fretboard and watching where you are "catching" the string you are bending may help.

Lighter guage strings will also help, of course, but this can happen even with light strings.

I also think you may want to pick where you do bends. I mean, if you are trying to bend at the 2nd or 3rd fret, that is inherently harder to do than in the middle of the neck. For myself, I try to solo in ways that allow my bends to be at least at the 5th fret, preferably the 7th 9th, etc. The more you are bending halfway between nut & bridge, the more easily the string will bend up (or down). You can rework any solo to move the bends you want into this range.

I don't bend a whole lot, and almost all my bends are one semitone, rarely two. I guess I want to learn to bend beyond that to add to my "bad" but I'd do it sparingly.

I've also read suggestions for using multiple fingers to help with a bend, so the force being put on the pad, pulling the skin away from under the nail, is shared by multiple fingers lessening the chance of injury. Sometimes I can do this, but I'm not really good at it, yet.

I do know that once you get this injury, it basically will stop you doing bends and generally will make playing painful till it heals, so I also try to be aware when I'm getting any of this sort of discomfort and then I move to playing something else that does not require a bend (or not with that particular finger) because it's really a lot easier to avoid this injury than to suffer it and then have to wait for it to heal.

Again, callouses really don't do squat to avoid this injury, in my experience (and based on what I read when I was researching this problem). Now, while a lot of people complain about this, others say they have never ever experienced the problem, so not all fingers are created equal. That does not mean you are doing something different or wrong, from those who do not suffer this injury, just that their skin to nail connection is perhaps inherently stronger, like some people have stronger enamel in their teeth and never get cavities no matter how rarely they brush. People's bodies are just different in a lot of ways.

Ken
Bernie Sanders for President!
#5
I've only just started messing around with bends, I always use 3 fingers whenever possible...don't know if that's what you do..? If not then try it, you need to exert less pressure to bend by doing it that way.

I've found that it's a lot easier for me to bend up (ie using the G, B and E strings) than it is to bend down. And it's not because the E, A and D strings are thicker either because I have no problems being up on the A and D. I guess the muscles will develop over time with practice.
#6
Quote by reflexez
No, 9's....

I think it's because sometimes I pick at the skin on my fingers and between the nail and it weakens it


I really hate being a guitar player who tends to pick at his fingers, it ruins the chance to play sometimes!

I have a really bad fear that all the picking has swelled my fingers and made them fatter so it's harder to fret notes too!


yeah that won't help. I do that too sometimes. Though guitar has helped me at least try to stop.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#7
Ive watched a few videos on stringbending and one of the main things stated is that the bend should come from the wrist rather than the individual fingers. It takes practice to get it right. Justinguitar.com has a pretty good video about it.
"You're an individual and so are all of these guitars – it's really difficult for somebody else to tell you what's going to be right for you." - Revenge of the Naked Ape
#8
this doesn't really happen with me... Ocasionally, if say, I stop practicing for a while and then go back and play for too much, or if I spend LOTS of hours practicing specifically bends, my fingers get soft and it'll hurt to bend, but I don't think that's what you mean.

I also can't really comment on picking on your fingers, since I don't do it and don't really know how much it would affect me... but some things to keep in mind: are you using your wrist to bend or are you using only your fingers? Also, do you use multiple fingers to bend?