#1
So, I had a professional setup done on my recently acquired Epi LP 100 (bought used) and everything is great but on the list of things done by the luthier, it said "Truss rod does not relax neck". I talked with the guy working the counter and he stated that its not really that big of a deal and that years ago, they used to just put steel rods in the necks with no intent of adjustment. He played it and it sounded great. I asked him how it played and he stated it was fine. So, what gives? I would think an issue with the truss rod would be pretty serious.
"You're an individual and so are all of these guitars – it's really difficult for somebody else to tell you what's going to be right for you." - Revenge of the Naked Ape
#2
I would say it's serious. The neck might be fine now but if it starts to bow there's nothing you can do about it. The other side to that though is that you might as well just ignore it and keep playing it, since it's pointless to fix and might not cause any issues for a long time.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
I would say it's serious. The neck might be fine now but if it starts to bow there's nothing you can do about it. The other side to that though is that you might as well just ignore it and keep playing it, since it's pointless to fix and might not cause any issues for a long time.


Thanks.... so, is it something I can fix or is it the neck itself?
"You're an individual and so are all of these guitars – it's really difficult for somebody else to tell you what's going to be right for you." - Revenge of the Naked Ape
#4
What he's talking about is that he may have thought that the neck didn't have enough relief, so he loosened the truss rod, and even when it was completely loose, it didn't add any relief. So.. the good news is that with constant string pressure on the neck, it may start to bow and have too much relief... so tightening the rod will take some out.. so really.. not serious unless it's bowed backwards... I got a 335 that did the same thing... bought it used and the guy that owned it before thought it was best to store the guitar with the strings loosened up , in his hot attic... Trust me... DON'T DO THIS.. LOL

as long as it plays ok.. I wouldn't worry about it..

As always.. JMHO
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#5
Quote by BluesPowered
Thanks.... so, is it something I can fix or is it the neck itself?

It could be fixed but it's a rather involved procedure, I wouldn't recommend it. As said above, it could potentially be fine for years. Just play it as long as you can and hope for the best.
#6
Sounds like the truss rod was installed incorrectly or something odd to that effect. Really, it'd cost more to fix it than the guitar is worth. Play it as much as you can, save some cash, get some skill, and look at investing in a different instrument in the future.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#8
Quote by bob13bob
if you bought it on ebay i'd push for a full refund. File a SNAD.


I actually got it at a local guitar shop but I wonder if they knew about this issue....

Ill just play it and see how things go. I keep my house cool in the summer and warm in the winter so there shouldnt be any changes due to humidity.
"You're an individual and so are all of these guitars – it's really difficult for somebody else to tell you what's going to be right for you." - Revenge of the Naked Ape
#9
It is not uncommon for the truss rod to be a bit tight in it's slot, current Gibsons have a rubber sheath to stop it sticking. Die hards pay big money to have the sheath removed so it's like a 50s neck!

Anyway, you could relieve the neck (an experienced luthier might have tried this anyway) by undoing the truss rod nut a lot and release the string tension too and then applying pressure from the back of the neck in the middle. You need to support the ends of the fingerboard (don't pull on the head unless you want it as a spare head)! Apply pressure and listen for a creak, then stop. The truss rod is now free again. Reset the truss rod tension as required.
#10
Quote by ESBlonde
It is not uncommon for the truss rod to be a bit tight in it's slot, current Gibsons have a rubber sheath to stop it sticking. Die hards pay big money to have the sheath removed so it's like a 50s neck!

Anyway, you could relieve the neck (an experienced luthier might have tried this anyway) by undoing the truss rod nut a lot and release the string tension too and then applying pressure from the back of the neck in the middle. You need to support the ends of the fingerboard (don't pull on the head unless you want it as a spare head)! Apply pressure and listen for a creak, then stop. The truss rod is now free again. Reset the truss rod tension as required.


See? This sounds feasible! Ill keep my eye open for someone that can do the job. Anyone know of a qualified luthier in San Antonio or Austin?
"You're an individual and so are all of these guitars – it's really difficult for somebody else to tell you what's going to be right for you." - Revenge of the Naked Ape